Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

"96.5% of new sex offenses are committed by someone who has never committed a sex offense before!"

Posted by on Jun. 20, 2007 at 8:38 AM
  • 1 Replies
Just stumble accross some info that may be helpful so wanted to share it.

"96.5% of new sex offenses are committed by someone who has never committed a sex offense before!"


What is Child Sexual Abuse?
pull quote There is no universal definition of child sexual abuse. However, a central characteristic of any abuse is the dominant position of an adult that allows him or her to force or coerce a child into sexual activity. Child sexual abuse may include fondling a child's genitals, masturbation, oral-genital contact, digital penetration, and vaginal and anal intercourse. Child sexual abuse is not solely restricted to physical contact; such abuse could include noncontact abuse, such as exposure, voyeurism, and child pornography. Abuse by peers also occurs.

Accurate statistics on the prevalence of child and adolescent sexual abuse are difficult to collect because of problems of underreporting and the lack of one definition of what constitutes such abuse. However, there is general agreement among mental health and child protection professionals that child sexual abuse is not uncommon and is a serious problem in the United States.

The impact of sexual abuse can range from no apparent effects to very severe ones. Typically, children who experience the most serious types of abuse—abuse involving family members and high degrees of physical force—exhibit behavior problems ranging from separation anxiety to posttraumatic stress disorder. However, children who are the victims of sexual abuse are also often exposed to a variety of other stressors and difficult circumstances in their lives, including parental substance abuse. The sexual abuse and its aftermath may be only part of the child's negative experiences and subsequent behaviors. Therefore, correctly diagnosing abuse is often complex. Conclusive physical evidence of sexual abuse is relatively rare in suspected cases. For all of these reasons, when abuse is suspected, an appropriately trained health professional should be consulted.

Who Are the Victims of Child Sexual Abuse?






Protecting Children From Sexual AbuseThe typical advice "Don't Talk to Strangers" doesn't apply in this case. Most sexual perpetrators are known to their victims.Do not instruct children to give relatives hugs and kisses. Let them express affection on their own terms.Teach your children basic sexual education. Teach them that no one should touch the "private" parts of their body. A health professional can also help to communicate sex education to children if parents are uncomfortable doing so.Develop strong communication skills with your children. Encourage them to ask questions and talk about their experiences. Explain the importance of reporting abuse to you or another trusted adult. Teach your children that sexual advances from adults are wrong and against the law. Give them the confidence to assert themselves against any adult who attempts to abuse them. Make an effort to know children's friends and their families.Instruct your child to never get into a car with anyone without your permission.Teach your children that their bodies are their own. That it is OK to say they do not want a hug or that certain kinds of contact make them uncomfortable. It is important to remember that physical force is often not necessary to engage a child in sexual activity. Children are trusting and dependent and will often do what is asked of them to gain approval and love. 
by on Jun. 20, 2007 at 8:38 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-1):
seatabugmama
by on Jun. 20, 2007 at 8:45 AM
THANK YOU!! THIS IS SOMETHING NO ONE ELSE WOULD HAVE POSTED!! ITS GOOD FOR US TO KNOW THIS FOR OUR CHILDREN , NOW EN-DAYS YOU CANT TRUST ANYONE , NOT EVEN YOUR OWN PREIST .. ITS SAD
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)