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Flushed Cheeks?

Posted by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 7:12 PM
  • 5 Replies

My dd is almost 6 months old and has been showing signs of teething since she was a little over 2 months old.  Today her cheeks became flushed and have been that way for over an hour.  She doesn't have a fever and her skin temperature is warm, but not above normal.  It doesn't seem to be rosacea because it's centered on her cheeks and not bumpy or irritated feeling/looking. 

Could this flushing of her cheeks be a sign of teething?

by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 7:12 PM
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Replies (1-5):
Sarahb21
by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 7:15 PM

Yes! My sons cheeks were as red as a tomato when he was teething!

Sarahb21
by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 7:17 PM

here I found a picture that shows how red his cheeks got! It wasn't just his cheeks it was his face! lol


gypsy_rose
by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 7:19 PM

Another thing to look into is fifths desiese (aka slap cheek) It's not dead. Here is the symptoms

 (mind you my son had it and he did NOT get the full body rash yes DRs confrmed it was slap cheeck)

Though fifth disease generally occurs in children between 4-10 years of age, it can affect any age group, including adults. It most commonly occurs during the winter and spring. The illness classically begins with a low-grade fever and malaise (a sense of not feeling well). After about a week, this is followed by a characteristic bright red rash on the cheeks (the so called "slapped cheeks" rash). Finally, after three to four days, a fine, red, lacelike rash can develop over the rest of the body. This rash may last for five days to a week and occasionally comes and goes for up to three weeks. The other symptoms are usually gone by the time the rash appears, and patients with the rash are usually not contagious. Unfortunately, as with many other viral illnesses, the features and timing of the different stages of illness are not always predictable.

While the illness is not serious in children, around 5% of children and around 50% of adults with fifth disease can have joint aches and pains. This arthritis or arthropathy is more common in females than males and is usually temporary, lasting days to weeks, but may become a long-term problem for months. People with arthritis from fifth disease usually have stiffness in the morning, with redness and swelling of the same joints on both sides of the body (a "symmetrical" arthritis). The joints most commonly involved are the knees, fingers, and wrists.

aidensmommy1105
by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 7:40 PM

same here. everytime.

Quoting Sarahb21:

Yes! My sons cheeks were as red as a tomato when he was teething!


stuckinamess
by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 7:44 PM

And fifths disease is going around here!!! Both my daughters have it and 17 out of 20 kids in their school based daycare have it.

Tracie
Wife to Khari
Mom to...
Kyra 9
Justice 5
4 Fur Babies...
Taylor, Max, Cleo & Tag

 

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