Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Wooly Bear catipillar! Help!

Posted by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:12 PM
  • 8 Replies

So my three year old son found a wooly bear catipillar outside on the sidewalk yesterday.  He was so convinced it was going to freeze to death he talked me into bringing it inside.  He is very concerned about this catipillar so i want to do my best not to let it die.  My question is I went online to find out what in the world it eats and it said fresh green grass.  Well it is February in Iowa and we just had a really bad snow storm today.  There is no green grass anywhere.

I have no idea what he was even doing out except it warmed up so maybe he thought spring had arrived.  What could I possibly feed this catipillar?!  All I have for him is a couple large dried up brown leaves and I dropped a little bit of water in the corner of the jar.  Any suggestions?


Landon 3-15-05        Xander 5-16-06      Jadzia 9-25-07





by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:12 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-8):
JPORTER2208
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:14 PM

did you try lettuce maybe?  thats  a hard one

 

Wifey to Robin love 7-15-06  Diagnosed with PCOS in 2006 


Mommy to Charlie baby boy2-2-08                      TTC #2

LaNette000
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:15 PM

 Do you have house plants, maybe could let the caterpillar camp out in one?

goatmom4
by Silver Member on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:16 PM

type that  cattpillar into google but if you have a farm friend   hay might work or we actually bought a flowwering houseplant for one of ours      Pansys are really tough flowers  and monarchs   like them     goodluck    

pricelesslove24
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:16 PM

do you have some turnip greens or collard even a leaf of mustard greens they eat that and u can get it at the grocery store call a pet shop and see if they have catipillar food

If your looking for support on your weight loss journey please feel free to stop by and join my group http://www.cafemom.com/group/survive09
Schleetle
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:17 PM

I was going to say walk through home depot garden department, and steal a leaf of some plant haha... thats terrible - they have some plants for only a couple bucks there if the garden center is open at yours this time of year. GL

Beyondthesky37
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:21 PM

Thank you everyone!  I'm going to try the lettuce and hopefully he'll eat that. If not I'll make a trip to Home depot. Does anyone know if they need a little water dish or is the moisture from the lettuce enough?


Landon 3-15-05        Xander 5-16-06      Jadzia 9-25-07





pricelesslove24
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:22 PM

lol i would so totally do that!

Quoting Schleetle:

I was going to say walk through home depot garden department, and steal a leaf of some plant haha... thats terrible - they have some plants for only a couple bucks there if the garden center is open at yours this time of year. GL


If your looking for support on your weight loss journey please feel free to stop by and join my group http://www.cafemom.com/group/survive09
missingbelle
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 8:22 PM

here is the link to the site !

http://www3.islandtelecom.com/~oehlkew/arctiidaecare.htm

 

Tony found some larvae (caterpillars) in the fall and set up a suitable storage container for them.

 

 

The orange plastic container is a tupperware type container with a tight fitting lid. Some damp paper towels were placed on the bottom, and then a few fall leaves and grasses were installed. The caterpillars (Ecpantheria scribbonia), found here, there and everywhere, were also inserted, the lid was snapped on tight (no air holes), and the small container went into the refrigerator crisper from November until May.

Approximately once a month, the container was opened; freshly moistened paper towels replaced the old towels and any frass (droppings=poop) was removed. The temperature inside the crisper remained at about 38 F, but much colder temperatures would/could be tolerated.

You could even store the container outside, but be careful: if the temperature gets into the mid fifties, the caterpillars will become active and will begin looking for green leaves for food. A short spurt of warmth can be endured without any food, but if your caterpillars stayed warm without food for a prolonged period of time, they would starve to death.

In anticipation of spring activity, Tony prepared a "rearing container" as soon as the ground thawed. A clear, considerably larger, plastic container received a layer of damp soil, a few inches deep, and some dandelions were transplanted.

Hint: Dandelions have deep tap roots, i.e., roots that grow straight down into the ground. If you thoroughly soak the ground around the dandelion plant with water, then the entire plant can easily be removed with a firm pull after the surrounding earth has been loosened with a garden trowel or shovel.

The plants can be moved to the new habitat, with the roots buried in an almost horizontal position under the soil. This new home (lid on tight) was kept outdoors, but out of direct sunlight which might cause overheating.

 

 

The caterpillars loved their new home, ate when they were hungry, and, at maturity, spun very loosely fashioned cocoons under the dry leaves.

You might have to transplant several dandelion roots to keep the pillars well supplied.

Inside the cocoons, the caterpillars shed their skins one last time to form pupae. One caterpillar makes one pupa (pew-puh); several caterpillars make several pupae (pew-pee).

A moth has already emerged from the top pupa. In late spring and early summer, the moth develops rapidly inside the pupal shell and ecloses (emerges) about three weeks after formation of the pupa.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)