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medical providers....

Posted by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:22 PM
  • 21 Replies

 Do you think that a nurse or doctor should be allowed to refuse to participate in certain procedures or treatments based on their religious beliefs....such as birth control, abortion, with holding IV fluids to a dying patient.  I am a nurse and am interested to hear what you have to say.

state your opinion - do NOT bash nurses and doctors.

by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:22 PM
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Replies (1-10):
marina069
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:24 PM

no, its their job, i think it would be really hard to be part of a procedure that you don't believe in or think is morally wrong, but i think you have to separate your feelings from your job, jmo, not bashing, criticising or preaching

Lauri, mommy to 2 princesses

CTRedSoxMom
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:27 PM

Nope, I think if they are getting into the medical field they should be able to fully do whatever their job entails. If they have a problem with it, clearly that field is not for them and they should move on.

That would be like an employee at McDonald's refusing to serve a certain person because they are fat, or they do not agree with what they ordered or it is against their religion to serve someone of that color or background.

April is Cesarean Awareness Month! 

SusanD
by Gold Member on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:28 PM

Yes I do...just because someone has chosen a particular profession does not mean that they have to throw their personal beliefs, values, and morals to the wind. There are plenty of providers who do provide these services, and as long as this provider is upfront and honest. If its a doctor, then they need to be honest and state that they can not provide this service. As for a nurse, then as long as she has made it known that she is not willing to do this becaus of she is religious reasons to her nurse supervisor, charge nurse, nurse manager..then that should suffice. If it is an emergency life or death situation, then of course they should not be able to refrain.

chinalouie
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:31 PM

agree....you would have way too many people make "personal judgement" calls.....

Quoting CTRedSoxMom:

Nope, I think if they are getting into the medical field they should be able to fully do whatever their job entails. If they have a problem with it, clearly that field is not for them and they should move on.

That would be like an employee at McDonald's refusing to serve a certain person because they are fat, or they do not agree with what they ordered or it is against their religion to serve someone of that color or background.


butterflyDAWN ladybug

mommywillU
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:31 PM

Talk about an ethical question. Haha. I believe it's totally their right within their practice. I have an OB who I asked about the IUD method of birth control. She said her office won't administer it. HOWEVER, if it's a doctor/nurse oncall at the hospital, and they are the oncall doctor/nurse, no I don't believe they have that right to refuse treatment to anyone. Hypocratic oath, do no harm. Withholding treatment because of a religious belief would be harming a patient if it was medically necessary.

CTRedSoxMom
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:33 PM

Exactly. Eventually it would just become out of control. There are plenty of medical services and fields that do not have to deal with any kind of birth control, abortion, or anything like that. They could take that route.
No one should be paid for a job they are not doing.

Quoting chinalouie:

agree....you would have way too many people make "personal judgement" calls.....

April is Cesarean Awareness Month! 

mom2ljh
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:33 PM

They chose their line of profession.  Of course a doctor should be able to abstain from abortion though.  Of course, only very specific types of doctors would perform such procedure (medically necessary or optional) so doctors DO have this choice. 
In general; however, no.  Whether my doctor's religious views are against it or not do NOT affect MY religious views.  A doctor should neither be allowed to withhold treatment from me, based on THEIR religious views, NOR try to force me to take treatment I'm refusing based on MY religious views.

BabyLucasMom
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:35 PM

Absolutely, your principles and beliefs are what makes you who you are. And if in order to protect them you have to say no, so be it.

But you should have to have some common sense regarding where you'll work. If, for example, you are against abortion, don't go and work in a place where this is performed.

SusanD
by Gold Member on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:36 PM


Quoting CTRedSoxMom:

Exactly. Eventually it would just become out of control. There are plenty of medical services and fields that do not have to deal with any kind of birth control, abortion, or anything like that. They could take that route.
No one should be paid for a job they are not doing.

Quoting chinalouie:

agree....you would have way too many people make "personal judgement" calls.....

Actually, currently medical professionals have the right to refuse to perform/assist in these procedures. Its not out of control as it stands, and they have had this right for many years. Many people go to their primary care or family doctor for birth control and other sensative subjects, so if they have a religious opposition should they just not be a doctor at all?

Also, how are they getting paid for a job they are not doing? If they don't perform the procedure, a doctor can't bill for it. Therefore he doesn't get paid for it. As for nurses, they are paid hourly and trust me when I say they have a lot of other duties to keep them busy during that hour to get compensated for. They don't have just that one patient in most cases.

CTRedSoxMom
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 4:37 PM

What about the pharmacists who are still getting paid but picking and choosing what scripts they will fill?

Quoting SusanD:

Also, how are they getting paid for a job they are not doing? If they don't perform the procedure, a doctor can't bill for it. Therefore he doesn't get paid for it. As for nurses, they are paid hourly and trust me when I say they have a lot of other duties to keep them busy during that hour to get compensated for. They don't have just that one patient in most cases.


April is Cesarean Awareness Month! 

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