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Anyone a Notary Public?

Posted by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:29 PM
  • 13 Replies

Just wondering I'm wanting to become one. I thought it may help out in the field I'm going into (legal) to become one. I'm looking at a website and it says all you have to do is fill out a application and send them $80 and your a notary. I thought it would be harder so I'm not sure the sites for real or is it that simple? 

by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:29 PM
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Replies (1-10):
LA8YBUG
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:33 PM

I am a notary and that is right.  It is simple, however, I became one thru work and they had to pay for me to be bonded.  But I am not sure how much.  It is kind of like an insurance policy.  In my state (AZ) you need to be bonded.  Good Luck!  Just google your Secretary of States office for your state, all the info is there.  That is who issues the Notaries.

brandithesuperm
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:37 PM

Ok the site I found says it's approved by the secretary of state. So do you think it's still legit? Here is the website if you want to take a look.

www.texasnotary.com

cmb121906
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:38 PM

Just make sure if you do it online, that it is a legit place. I would go some place in your town that has notaries and see if they suggest a place to get it done at.

 




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LA8YBUG
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:41 PM

Yes, it looks okay to me. Good Luck!

Quoting brandithesuperm:

Ok the site I found says it's approved by the secretary of state. So do you think it's still legit? Here is the website if you want to take a look.

www.texasnotary.com


brandithesuperm
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:43 PM

Alright then......Thank you ladies for the replies!!!

butterflyblu
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:45 PM

It's that simple!  I was a notary when I was a paralegal.  I had to fill out the application through the courthouse, pay the fee, and that's it!  I took my paperwork to Staples and ordered my stamp and embosser (that was about $50-60).  My license was good for 4 years I think.  Then you have to renew it.  My MIL is a notary as well.  She does it on the side. 

                      
 


           

brandithesuperm
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:49 PM

That's why I want to get mine, I'm looking for paralegal jobs around me and I just thought becoming a notary would make me a little more employable. But when you say your mil does it on the side....Does she make money from being a notary?

Quoting butterflyblu:

It's that simple!  I was a notary when I was a paralegal.  I had to fill out the application through the courthouse, pay the fee, and that's it!  I took my paperwork to Staples and ordered my stamp and embosser (that was about $50-60).  My license was good for 4 years I think.  Then you have to renew it.  My MIL is a notary as well.  She does it on the side. 

 

Bboysmommy11
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 12:51 PM

Yep same for me...I am in AZ and I got it because of work so didn't have to worry about paying any of the fees. 

Quoting LA8YBUG:

I am a notary and that is right.  It is simple, however, I became one thru work and they had to pay for me to be bonded.  But I am not sure how much.  It is kind of like an insurance policy.  In my state (AZ) you need to be bonded.  Good Luck!  Just google your Secretary of States office for your state, all the info is there.  That is who issues the Notaries.


  



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TruePuppyLove
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 1:00 PM

Well, I have lived in NJ and now NC and I held a notary in NJ and now have one in NC. In both states you were not only required to buy the most current Notary book with laws adn information, but you have to complete an 8 hour class and pass your notary exam at the end of the class. Then you must complete our application, which includes getting a signature of a county/state official in your district. Usually you need to visit your local county/district courthouse and have anyone in an appointed (voted in) position sign your application. Then you mail it off to the Sec. of State Notary division in your state. When your paperwork comes back approved, you then need to go back to your local county clerks office or register of deeds office and have them swear you in within 30 days of receiving your acceptance letter. Once you have been sworn in and taken the oath, they will stamp and authenticate/activate your notary status. You will probably sign a very large, very old book of all the notaries that have been sworn in over the last 100 years in that office. Anyway, then you leave with your validated paperwork  and you are almost ready to go. Last,  you may then proceed to fax or email your certificate from the state and your validated paperwork to any notary supplier that is licensed in your state to order your notary seal and supplies. Most states do require you to carry some type of bond/insurance. This is like $50 for your term...most states your notary is good for 5 years, but check in Texas. They will issue you your supplies, and an insurance policy/bond. Usually they offer a really good special where you can get your embossed notary seal, an ink stamped notary seal, a register to keep track of all the people you provide with a notary service, and your insurance coverage. This also enrolls you in the National Associate of Notary Publics, and give your 24/7 access to a live person in case you ever have any quesitons about what and how you can or cannot not provide a notary. When your notary expires, you must repeat the class and paperwork again. It is really just 1 day of class, and 1 day of paperwork. I do know that you can take the class online, but you still need to complete the rest of the required paperwork. If they are promising to just "send you a notary" after you do this online....I would be concerned. Call the Texas Notary Association tomorrow and ask.

By the way, you will have the choice on your notary seal or stamp whether or not to put your expiration date on the stamp. It only cost like $10-15 bucks for a stamp that is good for at least 5 years. If you are going to use yours a lot...do yourself a BIG favor and put your expiration date on the stamp. It will save you  tons of time over the years, and for another $10 or $15 buck, get a new stamp in 5 years, yours will be worn out anyway.

Also, make sure you think carefully about how you want your notary name to read. Once you apply....you must always print and sign exactly the way your stamp reads. I use my maiden and married name and so it takes me longer to print out and sign, but it is worth it to me. But you can use initials for all but your last name if you want...ex....you could have Jane Ann Smith, or Jane A. Smith, or J. A. Smith, or J. Ann Smith....but once you put it on your application...you are stuck doing it that way every time.

I am a school teacher but I work summers and part time during the school year for a real estate law office. I must use my notary 20 times a day easily. If you have any questions, please just PM me.

brandithesuperm
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 1:13 PM

Thanks so much!! The website offers an online class but it doesn't say it's required. I'm just affraid it's not a legit site it seems too easy.

Quoting TruePuppyLove:

Well, I have lived in NJ and now NC and I held a notary in NJ and now have one in NC. In both states you were not only required to buy the most current Notary book with laws adn information, but you have to complete an 8 hour class and pass your notary exam at the end of the class. Then you must complete our application, which includes getting a signature of a county/state official in your district. Usually you need to visit your local county/district courthouse and have anyone in an appointed (voted in) position sign your application. Then you mail it off to the Sec. of State Notary division in your state. When your paperwork comes back approved, you then need to go back to your local county clerks office or register of deeds office and have them swear you in within 30 days of receiving your acceptance letter. Once you have been sworn in and taken the oath, they will stamp and authenticate/activate your notary status. You will probably sign a very large, very old book of all the notaries that have been sworn in over the last 100 years in that office. Anyway, then you leave with your validated paperwork  and you are almost ready to go. Last,  you may then proceed to fax or email your certificate from the state and your validated paperwork to any notary supplier that is licensed in your state to order your notary seal and supplies. Most states do require you to carry some type of bond/insurance. This is like $50 for your term...most states your notary is good for 5 years, but check in Texas. They will issue you your supplies, and an insurance policy/bond. Usually they offer a really good special where you can get your embossed notary seal, an ink stamped notary seal, a register to keep track of all the people you provide with a notary service, and your insurance coverage. This also enrolls you in the National Associate of Notary Publics, and give your 24/7 access to a live person in case you ever have any quesitons about what and how you can or cannot not provide a notary. When your notary expires, you must repeat the class and paperwork again. It is really just 1 day of class, and 1 day of paperwork. I do know that you can take the class online, but you still need to complete the rest of the required paperwork. If they are promising to just "send you a notary" after you do this online....I would be concerned. Call the Texas Notary Association tomorrow and ask.

By the way, you will have the choice on your notary seal or stamp whether or not to put your expiration date on the stamp. It only cost like $10-15 bucks for a stamp that is good for at least 5 years. If you are going to use yours a lot...do yourself a BIG favor and put your expiration date on the stamp. It will save you  tons of time over the years, and for another $10 or $15 buck, get a new stamp in 5 years, yours will be worn out anyway.

Also, make sure you think carefully about how you want your notary name to read. Once you apply....you must always print and sign exactly the way your stamp reads. I use my maiden and married name and so it takes me longer to print out and sign, but it is worth it to me. But you can use initials for all but your last name if you want...ex....you could have Jane Ann Smith, or Jane A. Smith, or J. A. Smith, or J. Ann Smith....but once you put it on your application...you are stuck doing it that way every time.

I am a school teacher but I work summers and part time during the school year for a real estate law office. I must use my notary 20 times a day easily. If you have any questions, please just PM me.


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