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Mercola's suggested vaccinations???

Posted by on Apr. 13, 2010 at 7:24 AM
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Here's the whole 2-part article:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/12/29/vaccination-schedule-part-one.aspx

Basically, this is the "schedule":

In summary, this is a vaccination schedule that I would recommend:

  1. No vaccinations until a child is two years old.
  2. No vaccines that contain thimerosal (mercury).
  3. No live virus vaccines (except for smallpox, should it recur).
  4. These vaccines should be given one at a time, every six months, beginning at age 2:
    • A) Pertussis (acellular, not whole cell)
    • B) Diphtheria
    • C) Tetanus
    • D) Polio (the Salk vaccine, cultured in human cells)

What do you ladies think? At first I was thinking of avoiding ALL vax's altogether. But the article says it may be wise to avoid the four illnesses outlined above and therefore vaccinate against them.

Do any of you have a problem with THESE vaccinations in particular? If so, why?

Baby Slings at Nurtured Family

- Aiesha, soon to be mama-of-2!

by on Apr. 13, 2010 at 7:24 AM
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Replies (1-8):
SoniaL
by on Apr. 13, 2010 at 7:56 AM

my pedi said she can't get the vaccines separate like that. Can you still? We were discussing tetanus boosters and she said she can only get the DTaP and I would have to talk to the health department to see about getting just tetanus if i wanted it.

mothertory
by Member on Apr. 14, 2010 at 7:37 PM

Most people don't have the option of separating them like that.  Pertussis vaccines seem pretty dumb to me at that age since it's only dangerous for those who already have trouble breathing, like newborns who can't get vaccinated for it anyway.  If someone is recommending it, it's for the protection of someone else (so called herd immunity).

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on Apr. 14, 2010 at 8:21 PM

You cannot get Diptheria alone; I guess he recommends it based on the nature of the disease if you get it, not on the likelihood of contracting it.

Pertussis vax does not prevent infection or transmission and is primarily a threat to infants under 6 months.

Tetanus-- The risk of contracting Tetanus appears to me to be less than the chance of a vax reaction and it is difficult to find alone; it is usually paired with Diptheria.

Polio- I don't hear about reactions to the IPV, but it is still a vaccine for a highly unlikely event that is treatable. If an immune compromise Amish baby can pick-up an OPV derived strain and NOT develop a clinical case of polio, I'm not worried ;oP Also, my mother had paralytic polio as a child and more is known about treatment and recovery than in the 40s (just in her legs and she recovered).

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on Apr. 14, 2010 at 8:23 PM


Quoting SoniaL:

my pedi said she can't get the vaccines separate like that. Can you still? We were discussing tetanus boosters and she said she can only get the DTaP and I would have to talk to the health department to see about getting just tetanus if i wanted it.

There are four forms of tetanus immunization.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002031.htm
The DTaP vaccine is a "3-in-1" vaccine that protects against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus. It can be given to children less than 7 years old. It is injected, usually into the arm or the thigh. DTaP is a safer version of an older vaccine known as DTP, which is no longer used in the United States.
The DT vaccine is a "2-in-1" vaccine that can be given to children less than 7 years old. It does not contain pertussis vaccine, but does contain vaccine that protects against diphtheria and tetanus. It is injected, usually into the arm or thigh.
The Td vaccine is the "adult" vaccine. It is a "2-in-1" vaccine that protects against tetanus and diphtheria. It contains a slightly different dose of diphtheria vaccine than the DT vaccine. It can be given to anyone older than 7 years old. It is injected, usually into the arm.
A booster Td vaccine should be given at ages 11-12. Older children who need a booster Td vaccine at ages 11 or 12 should receive the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine. Older children between age 11 and 18 who have not already recieved a TD booster vaccine should receive the new Tdap vaccine.
Instead of the standard Td booster every 10 years, adults between the ages of 19 and 65 should receive Tdap one time.
Tetanus vaccine (T vaccine) can be given as a single vaccine, but this is not generally available. It is also injected, usually into the arm.
Tetanus immune globulin is not actually a vaccine. It is a preparation that is made from serum (part of the blood) from a person or animal (such as a horse) that contains antibodies against tetanus.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

rabbit4
by Member on Apr. 15, 2010 at 5:09 PM

i didn't read the whole article but doesn't it say that this advice is coming from this dr. miller guy rather than dr. mercola?  i won't get the pertussis vaccine because 70% of SIDS cases occur within 3 weeks of receiving this vaccine.  and if you research pertussis, it is not really that scary.  i'll take the pertussis over the shot.  and i would never get a combination shot or more than one shot at a time if i were ever going to even consider getting one.  i have a problem with the diphtheria vaccine because no one gets diphtheria anymore and i feel it is not a risk.  i will not get the tetanus shot because if my child gets a deep wound i can take him to the ER and have them give him an injection in the wound.  no need for an injection into his muscle tissue and no need to do it before he even gets the cut.  and polio...there hasn't been a case of wild polio in this country for like 30 years.  the only polio that's going on here is coming from the vaccines.  i've yet to find a vaccine that i think is safe and necessary.  also...it's not just thimerosal that you should be worried about.  it's aluminum and the possible viral and/or bacterial contaminants that could be swimming around in that mystery chemical soup.  there are 100 different chemicals in vaccines.  and animal tissue.  tissue from cows, rats, pigs, sheep, monkeys, humans.  who knows what's in that tissue and what you might be doing by injecting that into a child.  bottom line is this...if you look at the actual science behind vaccine research, it is weak at best.  none of it has been proven safe.  not a single shot.  read the actual studies and see for yourself before you take the word of anyone.  keep in mind also that pediatricians are trained to diagnose and treat illness.  they are not experts on vaccines, neurology, toxicology, immunology and are taught very little about pharmacology in medical school.  they are passing down to you what they get from the AAP and the CDC.  they are not trying to hurt you, they just have blind faith in those that taught them.  you have access to the same information they do.  you don't have to go to medical school to see that this is bad science.

ashall237
by on Apr. 15, 2010 at 5:14 PM

From my understanding Pertussis is not available by itself.

zdmj31908
by Bronze Member on Apr. 15, 2010 at 8:08 PM

the only one i would ever consider is the tetanus and that is ONLY if we are out in an area where there is a large risk of him contracting it if he were to step on a nail or have one puncture his skin. other than that...no.

SuperMommy486
by Bronze Member on Apr. 15, 2010 at 11:05 PM

I still won't give any vax's. Sometimes I wonder about Dr. Mercola...

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