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would you get the tetnus shot?

Posted by on May. 2, 2010 at 1:53 PM
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Question: would you get it?

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yes

no

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Total Votes: 32

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if your child stepped on a rusted nail? or anything tetnus related?? i was just wondering, i dont know if there are any other ways aside from the shot to make keep her safe if it did happen. So would you get the tetnus shot if god forbid it was to happen?

by on May. 2, 2010 at 1:53 PM
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Replies (1-10):
ashall237
by on May. 2, 2010 at 2:56 PM

My dd was bit by a dog when we were on vacation in another state. The ER doctor strongly recommended getting the vaccine. At the time I didn't understand how it could help her after already being exposed to the bacteria. I called my doctor back home and he told me to watch it to see if it looks like it's getting infected. If so after 12-24 hours then to go back and get the shot just in case. We knew the dog and we knew that he was old and didn't eat poop or dig or get into anything really. I didn't feel like the risk of her getting tetanus was very high. I don't know. It was a very hard decision to make but I choose not to get the shot and she was just fine, thank goodness.

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on May. 2, 2010 at 3:20 PM

You wouldn't give an unvaxed person a Tetanus (really, at minimum it would also have diphtheria in it and most places do not have TT) you would give the TIG.


DTaP  In the United States, tetanus is primarily a disease of older adults.   Persons greater than or equal to 40 years of age now account for over 70% of reported cases. Tetanus Surveillance 1998-2000 , Power of 10. An average of 43 people per year contract Tetanus and there are 0-2 deaths out of a population of 301,139,947 (over 300 MILLION) in the US. (In comparison (FEMA) estimates that " 300 people are injured and 80 people are killed each year by lightning" each year in the U.S.).

"From 1992 through 2000 (9 years), 15 cases of tetanus in children <15 years of age were reported from 11 states. Two cases were in neonates <10 days of age; the other 13 cases were in children who ranged in age from 3to 14 years. The median length of hospitalization was 28 days; 8 children required mechanical ventilation." (Pedatrics). There were no deaths. (I don't have info on their state of health or wound care).

It is not the rust that causes tetanus, so a rusty nail in and of itself is not the issue. Tetanus needs an anaerobic environment to thrive. A wound that has bled is not typically that environment. Keep it clean and covered.
A Tetanus vax at time of injury is supposed to be a booster to those current on vax and TIG (tetanus immunoglobulin) is for the unvaxed.

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on May. 2, 2010 at 3:20 PM


"Keep in mind that the tetanus vaccine became available for widespread civilian use in the late 1940's. Thus tetanus mortality had declined from 205 deaths per 100,000 wounds in the American Civil War (1860) to about .4 deaths per 100,000 population in 1947 at the beginning of widespread civilian use of the vaccine. This means that sanitation, nutrition, year around nutritional improvements, general hygiene, and wound hygiene had reduced the mortality and incidence of tetanus by as much as 99.8 percent before the widespread use of tetanus vaccine." Hilary Butler 89wds


http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/medical/clostridium_tetani.htm
http://www.textbookofbacteriology.net/clostridia.html
Clostridium tetani: the bacterial species that causes tetanus; it produces a potent exotoxin (neurotoxin) that is intensely toxic for humans horses, and other animals when formed in tissues or injected, but not when ingested. The organism is found in soil, especially heavily-manured soils, and in the intestinal tracts and feces of various animals. Carrier rates in humans vary from 0 to 25%

Tetanus as a clinical entity is linked to a bacteria, Clostridium tetani. Obviously, the germ is not as malicious as one may think because it lives as a harmless commensal in the animal and human intestinal tract (1). It is not the very presence of the bacteria which causes the trouble, but the toxins that are produced by the bacteria under anaerobic conditions, that is, where the bacteria operates in an environment free of oxygen. These toxins can be spread through the blood vessels and finally affect the nervous system causing tetanic muscle contraction and pain.

The causative bacterium Clostridium tetani is a hardy organism capable of living many years in the soil in a form called a spore. Tetanus occurs when a wound becomes contaminated with bacterial spores. Infection follows when spores become activated and develop into gram-positive bacteria that multiply and produce a very powerful toxin (poison) that affects the muscles. Tetanus spores are found throughout the environment, usually in soil, dust, and animal waste. The usual locations for the bacteria to enter your body are puncture wounds, such as those caused by rusty nails, splinters or insect bites. Burns, any break in the skin, and IV drug access sites are also potential entryways for the bacteria Tetanus is acquired through contact with environment; it is not transmitted from person to person. http://www.emedicinehealth.com/tetanus/article_em.htm


Caring for a puncture wound
Several times a day for four or five days, soak the wound in warm water. Use a bathtub or basin if the wound is on the foot or leg. Soaking helps clean the wound from the inside out.

Monitor carefully for signs of infection. Because puncture wounds go deep, an infection may not become visible for several days after the injury.

When to seek immediate medical help
When the wound becomes infected. Signs of infection include pus, increased pain, swelling, redness, tenderness, a sensation of warmth or visible redness radiating from the wound, or a fever of 100 degrees F or more.

http://iier.isciii.es/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000940.htm

Treatment of Tetanus

http://www.healthscout.com/ency/68/291/main.html#TreatmentofTetanus

Immune globulin, given intramuscularly, is the immediate treatment of unimmunized individuals exposed to material likely to contain the tetanus bacteria. Treatment includes bed rest and quiet conditions. Immune globulin (also called gamma globulin or immune serum globulin) is a substance made from human blood plasma. The plasma, processed from donated human blood, contains antibodies that protect the body against diseases. When you are given an immune globulin, your body uses antibodies from other people's blood plasma to help prevent illness.

Sedation, paralysis with certain medications, and mechanical ventilation (i.e., respirator) may be necessary to control the spasms.
Antimicrobial drugs, such as penicillin, are used to eradicate the bacteria.


Recovery
For patients who survive tetanus, recovery can be long (1 to 2 months) and burdensome. Muscle spasms may begin to decrease after 10 to 14 days and disappear after another week or so. Residual weakness, stiffness, and other complaints may persist for a prolonged period, but complete recovery can occur from uncomplicated tetanus.
Patients with tetanus are hospitalized in an intensive care unit until it is clear that the progression of the disease has stabilized at a level that does not interfere with vital functions, and that therapy can be managed outside the unit.


There are four forms of tetanus immunization.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002031.htm
The DTaP vaccine is a "3-in-1" vaccine that protects against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus. It can be given to children less than 7 years old. It is injected, usually into the arm or the thigh. DTaP is a safer version of an older vaccine known as DTP, which is no longer used in the United States.
The DT vaccine is a "2-in-1" vaccine that can be given to children less than 7 years old. It does not contain pertussis vaccine, but does contain vaccine that protects against diphtheria and tetanus. It is injected, usually into the arm or thigh.
The Td vaccine is the "adult" vaccine. It is a "2-in-1" vaccine that protects against tetanus and diphtheria. It contains a slightly different dose of diphtheria vaccine than the DT vaccine. It can be given to anyone older than 7 years old. It is injected, usually into the arm.
A booster Td vaccine should be given at ages 11-12. Older children who need a booster Td vaccine at ages 11 or 12 should receive the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine. Older children between age 11 and 18 who have not already recieved a TD booster vaccine should receive the new Tdap vaccine.
Instead of the standard Td booster every 10 years, adults between the ages of 19 and 65 should receive Tdap one time.
Tetanus vaccine (T vaccine) can be given as a single vaccine, but this is not generally available. It is also injected, usually into the arm.
Tetanus immune globulin is not actually a vaccine. It is a preparation that is made from serum (part of the blood) from a person or animal (such as a horse) that contains antibodies against tetanus.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

buzymamaof3
by Bronze Member on May. 2, 2010 at 7:20 PM

this!

Quoting happytexasCM:

You wouldn't give an unvaxed person a Tetanus (really, at minimum it would also have diphtheria in it and most places do not have TT) you would give the TIG.

 

 

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Isabelles_mommy
by Bronze Member on May. 2, 2010 at 10:09 PM

i wouldn't give her the shot, my daughter has stepped on fish hooks and nails before, none were rusty but they weren't the cleanest things. I just pulled them out, gave her homeopathy (ledium) and made sure it was kept clean and covered till it healed. She has never had any problems and she has never been vaccinated. So I say no.

littlelambe
by on May. 3, 2010 at 4:44 PM

Tetnus is actually not in rusty nails. Tetnus is carried by horses, cows, and other livestock. We have calves and the neighbor's horses, so yes, I would in my case because of rthe risks. And yes, they DO have just a tetnus shot.

zdmj31908
by Bronze Member on May. 3, 2010 at 7:22 PM

only if it were a high case of it. my son fell on a nail when he was one and i didnt get it for him. it was a carpet nail in my house so the risk was low. if we were out in the fields(we live near alot of livestock) then i probably would.

Marsena
by Member on May. 6, 2010 at 7:34 PM

I'm still learning alot about not vaccinating, so bear with me :) if you aren't  vaccinated for tetnus, and you get tetnus by whatever means, are you then immune to it, like you get immune to chicken pox, or is it more like a virus that you can get however often you're exposed?

SabrinaMBowen
by on May. 7, 2010 at 6:13 PM

When I was 15 I stuck a nail through the back of my leg. My mother didn't know any better and took me to the doctor. While I was at NO RISK of tetnus, the doctor failed to inform us of this, and insisted on giving me the vaccine. Within moments I passed out and that single injection almost killed me. And also started my research in to vaccines.

Tetnus is not something that you can get from the average "rusty nail" nor is it something that one is exposed to just because their is a cut...  Like was already stated there are specific conditions needed for tetnus to be a threat - IF and ONLY IF, I felt both the wound and the situation put my child at risk I would make sure to keep the wound clean and dry, if they started to show signs of illness I would take them in to the doctor. However, seeing as how this and most illnesses which we vaccinate for are treatable AFTER exposure I would generally opt to do that rather than vaccinate while not knowing if there was any real danger.

SabrinaMBowen
by on May. 7, 2010 at 6:15 PM


Quoting Marsena:

I'm still learning alot about not vaccinating, so bear with me :) if you aren't  vaccinated for tetnus, and you get tetnus by whatever means, are you then immune to it, like you get immune to chicken pox, or is it more like a virus that you can get however often you're exposed?

You don't build immunity to Tetnus the same way you do Chickenpox. But the average American is never exposed to tetnus unless they spend a large amount of time on a farm. So chances are you aren't going to be exposed more than once - if that much!

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