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With my first son I got the rhogam shot at 27 weeks because I was O- and was told by the doctor I needed it. Well I ended up having a reaction to the shot, I was so sore I couldn't get out of bed and ran a low fever. (I didn't realize that wasn't normal) Once my son was born he had O- blood too, so I didn't have to get the shot. Now I am pregnant again and at 28 weeks I got the rhogam shot once again, I had severe pain in my lower back and upper stomach, I could not move my left arm and I was running a low fever. I was in bed crying I was in so much pain, I called the doctor and they wrote it in my records because it wasn't normal to do that. I am due June 11th, anyway I was looking up online and saw several things that said the shot at 28 weeks isn't necessary, is that true? Did any of you refuse to get the rhogam shot while pregnant? My husband and I are planning on having two more babies after this one and if you don't need it at 28 weeks I am refusing to get the shot again, I don't want to end up having a worse reaction than the first two times. 

by on Apr. 21, 2012 at 11:39 PM
Replies (11-20):
rinaann
by on Apr. 23, 2012 at 9:46 AM

Well you are lucky because you dont have to get the rhogam shot

i never thought about if positive could produce negative. i am assuming it is just like any other recessive gene type thing

And yes if both parents are negative their child will be negative

Quoting AJMRmom:

 Is it necessarily true that because both parents are negative the baby will be? I haven't studied this in great detail BUT, Both me and my children's father are positive, but my grandma is negative. Out of my 5 children, two of them are negative. I was surprised because I didn't think it could happen and asked the nurse about it, because I could GUARANTEE who their father was, LOL. They assured me it could happen.


AJMRmom
by Member on Apr. 23, 2012 at 9:50 AM

 I'm NOT saying your wrong, but it really doesn't make sense that two negatives can only produce a negative if two positives can produce a negative. I think this is definitely something I'm going to study further into, out of curiosity LOL!!! THis is one I'm going to have to look further into LOL..My grandma had 4 positive children and was negative and NEVER received a rhogam shot...:) It's one of those things that you have to decide what your willing to risk or not risk, as with everything in parenting.

Quoting rinaann:

Well you are lucky because you dont have to get the rhogam shot

i never thought about if positive could produce negative. i am assuming it is just like any other recessive gene type thing

And yes if both parents are negative their child will be negative

Quoting AJMRmom:

 Is it necessarily true that because both parents are negative the baby will be? I haven't studied this in great detail BUT, Both me and my children's father are positive, but my grandma is negative. Out of my 5 children, two of them are negative. I was surprised because I didn't think it could happen and asked the nurse about it, because I could GUARANTEE who their father was, LOL. They assured me it could happen.

 

 

twogirl91
by on Apr. 23, 2012 at 9:51 AM

I'm still confused though, if the shot only works in a 72 hour time frame from the time I am exposed to the +antigens then what good done the routine 28week shot do?? That doesn't makes any sense to me. I completely understand the one after birth or if you had a major trauma while pregnant.

Quoting rinaann:

Like i said, you might have been exposed to the + antigens in a number of ways

if you have and you do not have the shot then your body can attack the fetus

You should weigh your options and see what you are willing to risk

Quoting twogirl91:

My husband is O+, I understand getting the shot after the baby is born, but from what I understand it only works in a 72 hour time frame, so why is the 28week shot needed?



rinaann
by on Apr. 23, 2012 at 9:56 AM

I will explain it a little more. with the Rh factor there are two "slots" for genes

You can either be Rh+ Rh+, Rh+ Rh-, or Rh- Rh- 

If you have Rh+ at all you have Rh+ markers on the blood. Rh- attacks these markers that is the point of the rhogam shot

When you pass on alleles to your kids they have a pick from either of the "slots" you and your DH are both RhF, which means you both gave up your Rh- and made a Rh- Rh- baby 

If two people are Rh- Rh-, you cant give up an Rh+ so they will ONLY have Rh- children

Your grandma is VERY lucky, that usually doesnt go well. you are almost 100% likely to be exposed after the first pregnancy if you arent exposed already before. 

Quoting AJMRmom:

 I'm NOT saying your wrong, but it really doesn't make sense that two negatives can only produce a negative if two positives can produce a negative. I think this is definitely something I'm going to study further into, out of curiosity LOL!!! THis is one I'm going to have to look further into LOL..My grandma had 4 positive children and was negative and NEVER received a rhogam shot...:) It's one of those things that you have to decide what your willing to risk or not risk, as with everything in parenting.

Quoting rinaann:

Well you are lucky because you dont have to get the rhogam shot

i never thought about if positive could produce negative. i am assuming it is just like any other recessive gene type thing

And yes if both parents are negative their child will be negative

Quoting AJMRmom:

 Is it necessarily true that because both parents are negative the baby will be? I haven't studied this in great detail BUT, Both me and my children's father are positive, but my grandma is negative. Out of my 5 children, two of them are negative. I was surprised because I didn't think it could happen and asked the nurse about it, because I could GUARANTEE who their father was, LOL. They assured me it could happen.


 


rinaann
by on Apr. 23, 2012 at 9:59 AM

You are supposed to have a dose at 28 weeks, and then a second dose 72 hours after delievery 

its kind of like a booster in a way 

Quoting twogirl91:

I'm still confused though, if the shot only works in a 72 hour time frame from the time I am exposed to the +antigens then what good done the routine 28week shot do?? That doesn't makes any sense to me. I completely understand the one after birth or if you had a major trauma while pregnant.

Quoting rinaann:

Like i said, you might have been exposed to the + antigens in a number of ways

if you have and you do not have the shot then your body can attack the fetus

You should weigh your options and see what you are willing to risk

Quoting twogirl91:

My husband is O+, I understand getting the shot after the baby is born, but from what I understand it only works in a 72 hour time frame, so why is the 28week shot needed?




AJMRmom
by Member on Apr. 23, 2012 at 9:04 PM

 I appreciate you taking the time to explain it:) And understanding that IT was TRULY curiosity and not an "argument" that many others would have taken it as!

Bless your heart!!

Quoting rinaann:

I will explain it a little more. with the Rh factor there are two "slots" for genes

You can either be Rh+ Rh+, Rh+ Rh-, or Rh- Rh- 

If you have Rh+ at all you have Rh+ markers on the blood. Rh- attacks these markers that is the point of the rhogam shot

When you pass on alleles to your kids they have a pick from either of the "slots" you and your DH are both RhF, which means you both gave up your Rh- and made a Rh- Rh- baby 

If two people are Rh- Rh-, you cant give up an Rh+ so they will ONLY have Rh- children

Your grandma is VERY lucky, that usually doesnt go well. you are almost 100% likely to be exposed after the first pregnancy if you arent exposed already before. 

Quoting AJMRmom:

 I'm NOT saying your wrong, but it really doesn't make sense that two negatives can only produce a negative if two positives can produce a negative. I think this is definitely something I'm going to study further into, out of curiosity LOL!!! THis is one I'm going to have to look further into LOL..My grandma had 4 positive children and was negative and NEVER received a rhogam shot...:) It's one of those things that you have to decide what your willing to risk or not risk, as with everything in parenting.

Quoting rinaann:

Well you are lucky because you dont have to get the rhogam shot

i never thought about if positive could produce negative. i am assuming it is just like any other recessive gene type thing

And yes if both parents are negative their child will be negative

Quoting AJMRmom:

 Is it necessarily true that because both parents are negative the baby will be? I haven't studied this in great detail BUT, Both me and my children's father are positive, but my grandma is negative. Out of my 5 children, two of them are negative. I was surprised because I didn't think it could happen and asked the nurse about it, because I could GUARANTEE who their father was, LOL. They assured me it could happen.

 

 

 

 

milliemoo
by Member on Apr. 23, 2012 at 10:46 PM

Hi, I refused the Rhogam shot with my first pregnancy and my doctor was more than fine with it - I am now 18 weeks pregnant and my ob @ Kaiser looked at me like I had two heads when I asked if I could wait until after the baby is born.  She is insisting there are no side effects, but there are plenty documented and listed in the package insert.  

gmapoohz
by Member on Apr. 24, 2012 at 12:14 AM
1 mom liked this

I was shocked to learn recently that it has become routine for physicians to give the Rhogam shot to moms during pregnancy.  I haven't yet tried to research when this practice started and based on what it began - but if I was pregnant I sure would and also insist that the physician present research to me to justify this practice. 

Just because a physiology book says something is possible, doesn't mean it's likely to happen and I would want to see real research on actual cases of this being a problem - if a pregnant woman falls down some stairs or gets in a car accident and there is an RH-/RH+ risk, as others stated there is time to take action if needed.  Giving injections (flu shots, DTAP,  Rhogam, Hep-B, etc, etc) to pregnant mothers and newborns should never be done routinely.

This was NEVER done for many years. It was always given ONLY right after birth of each child and ONLY if mother was RH- and father RH+.  I had the shot right after the birth of both my children, in 1979 and 1980.  No one ever talked about giving it during pregnancy. Fortunately, our daughter is RH+ so the issue did not come up for her when she had her two children.

I would also like to know if anyone is tracking any correlation to giving this shot during pregnancy and any miscarriages - they badger pregnant women into getting flu shots, and this can cause miscarriage, and who knows what else, since they started doing this without any research as far as I know - but of course they never tell the parents that. 

Gma Poohz

firemom702
by Member on Apr. 24, 2012 at 1:38 AM
This exactly


Quoting jddragonfly:

I got the shot at 28 weeks during my first pregnancy, but with the second I didn't.  My midwife checked my blood for antibodies throughout the nine months and also said that chances of any blood mixing were low unless something happened, such as an accident or other event.  I did, however, get the shot after my children were born since they were both positive and the chance of blood mixing is a lot higher during birth .  I did not have a reaction like you.  In fact, the injection site was not even noticeable the following day, and I'm a pretty sensitive gal.  If it were me, and I had a similar reaction to you, I personally wouldn't even consider getting the shot in following pregnancies, especially considering your reaction the second time was worse than the first.  Anyway, those are my thoughts!  Good luck!


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uncommonsense
by New Member on Apr. 24, 2012 at 3:16 PM
2 moms liked this

I have done a LOT of research on this issue, since I am RH- and have had 5 live births (3 at home).  My first 2 babies were delivered at the hospital thru traditional OB/GYN group and I was given Rhogam at wk 28 and post birth.  I became very sick and weakened from these shots (every time), and contracted the worst flues of my life shortly thereafter, as well as developing PUPPPs from my shocked liver.  When I finally decided I was NOT going to have another medicalized birth, I still had to make a decision on this shot.  After much study, and much discussion with midwives, I decided to wait until post birth - and AFTER they performed a blood type on the infant (right after birth).  I only recieved one shot with my last 3 babies because only one was + blood.  Therefore, I did not NEED the rhogam with the other 2.  The Rhogam that my midwife purchased for me was a non thermasol/non-alluminum variety.  I did not have the same reaction, although I did have a harder time recovering after that particular birth.  I would never again recommend to any mother that she should ever have any vaccine - no matter what type - during pregnancy.  When you get very ill from a vaccine while pregnant, the baby inside you is also affected.  You are also more vulnerable to toxemia and other toxic condtions if your liver is overtoxified from the vaccine.  Make no mistake about this!  There ARE risks involved anytime you take a vaccine, and especially during pregnancy. 

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