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Let's Lie to Everyone About Vaccines and Safety to Gain Their Trust

Posted by on Apr. 28, 2012 at 1:45 PM
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thats what i understood the article to say

http://www.familypracticenews.com/news/more-top-news/single-view/build-trust-to-overcome-vaccine-hesitancy/218bc4ee5d.html

Build Trust to Overcome Vaccine Hesitancy

By: SHARON WORCESTER, Family Practice News Digital Network

ATLANTA – Childhood immunization programs in the United States have been "a remarkable success" when it comes to vaccine coverage and disease prevention, but an increasing threat to this success is "vaccine hesitancy" – the term applied to concerns about safety and efficacy of vaccines that lead some parents to resist vaccination of their children as recommended, according to Dr. Arthur Reingold.

Although the vast majority of unimmunized children are unimmunized not as a result of vaccine hesitancy, but as a result of a failure of immunization programs to reach them (which itself is often a factor of socioeconomic status), there does exist a genuine anti-vaccine movement involving people who "see the world differently in terms of whether vaccines are a good thing or a bad thing," Dr. Reingold, professor of epidemiology and associate dean for research at the University of California, Berkeley, said at the International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases.


Photo credit: Sean Locke/iStockphoto.com


Lack of trust, along with misinformation, lack of information, and fear resulting from the belief that a child has died or been injured as a result of vaccination are the major contributors to vaccine hesitancy, Dr. Arthur Reingold said.



The problem of unreached children is something that increased resources and attention can certainly do a great deal to eliminate; the increasing problem of vaccine hesitancy requires something more – the building of trust, he said.

Some parents may be accepting of vaccines, but may have questions or concerns about safety. Others may reject vaccination due to religious or other personal beliefs, or they may accept some, but not all vaccinations because they believe the current schedule is "somehow an affront to the immune system," Dr. Reingold said.

"Increasingly, many parents are anxious and have questions, so we can’t assume that they will accept vaccination," he said, noting that addressing these concerns is time-consuming and challenging for the pediatrician or family doctor, but taking the time is an important aspect of building trust.

Trust-building is one of the best approaches to overcoming vaccine hesitancy, he said.

Lack of trust, along with misinformation, lack of information, and fear resulting from the belief that a child has died or been injured as a result of vaccination are the major contributors to vaccine hesitancy, he said.

Those most likely to refuse vaccination for their children are those with a higher income and mothers who are married and who have a college degree – and who have doubts about the effectiveness of vaccines, Dr. Reingold noted, adding that these are parents who "generally don’t necessarily trust the government or their physician to provide them with accurate information."

This is a very different group from those whose children are unimmunized due to lack of access, he said.

Adding to the concerns about vaccine hesitancy is the fact that several states already allow for exemptions based on religious or personal convictions, and a recent report said that seven states are weighing making it much easier to opt out.

Data show that rates of vaccine-preventable disease are higher in states that make it easy to opt out. Pertussis and measles are two examples of diseases that increase as vaccine rates decrease.


Choosing Not to VaccinateChoosing Not to Vaccinate-proud group owner

by on Apr. 28, 2012 at 1:45 PM
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FebPenguins
by Member on Apr. 28, 2012 at 5:25 PM
2 moms liked this

Data show that rates of vaccine-preventable disease are higher in states that make it easy to opt out. Pertussis and measles are two examples of diseases that increase as vaccine rates decrease.


Really? So how then does the 80% who are vaxed "catch" pertussis~ oh wait~ if they have been vaxed surely it cannot be pertussis, must be bronchitis!

kitty8199
by Silver Member on Apr. 29, 2012 at 12:13 PM
Any medical professional that denies vaxes can cause injury or death is not to be trused. A tylenol can kill. ANY drug or medical intervention can kill. Talk about "misinformation".
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sreichelt26
by Member on Apr. 29, 2012 at 2:41 PM

Those most likely to refuse vaccination for their children are those with a higher income and mothers who are married and who have a college degree – and who have doubts about the effectiveness of vaccines, Dr. Reingold noted, adding that these are parents who "generally don’t necessarily trust the government or their physician to provide them with accurate information.

Well, maybe that's because they generally don't. And I think there's something to be said that those who are more educated are the ones refusing vaccines...

kitty8199
by Silver Member on May. 1, 2012 at 12:20 AM
Don't people trust vaxes bc the "higher educated" make and reccomend them? But its wrong if the higher educated refuse them. SMH. Logic fails some people.

Quoting sreichelt26:

Those most likely to refuse vaccination for their children are those with a higher income and mothers who are married and who have a college degree – and who have doubts about the effectiveness of vaccines, Dr. Reingold noted, adding that these are parents who "generally don’t necessarily trust the government or their physician to provide them with accurate information.

Well, maybe that's because they generally don't. And I think there's something to be said that those who are more educated are the ones refusing vaccines...

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rachelrothchild
by Bronze Member on May. 4, 2012 at 5:00 PM

"Lack of trust, along with misinformation, lack of information, and fear resulting from the belief that a child has died or been injured as a result of vaccination are the major contributors to vaccine hesitancy", he said.

Misinformation and lack of information, LOL.  

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