Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

When to say something?

Posted by on Mar. 8, 2014 at 1:17 PM
  • 6 Replies
  • 176 Total Views
Now that I have spent the past year researching and learning about vaccines and their side-effects, I am so tempted to "share my knowledge" with everyone. But I don't want to be the "crazy" person that is anti-vax and a conspiracy theorist. You know? I am in a few cm groups and on FB groups and moms are always posting things that make me feel like vaccines are to blame for their baby's issue, but I never actually ever post anything in fear of being the crazy lady in the group.

How often do you share your beliefs and how do you go about it in a not-crazy way? LOL. Also, how do you keep yourself from feeling like people that do vaccinate aren't child abusers? It breaks my heart to see my nieces being vaxed knowing what I know now.
by on Mar. 8, 2014 at 1:17 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-6):
mjrex87
by Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 3:18 PM
1 mom liked this

I keep my thoughts to myself and try to stay out of those types of conversations. I am not good with confrontation, so it would only be hurting myself to get involved. That being said, I do have a few people who know I do not vaccinate and I can confide in/ vent to them when I need to get it off my chest. My niece is vaccinated and it kills me, but there's nothing I can do about it. I have shared my thoughts a few times with my brother and SIL, but they are of the mindset that their pediatrician knows everything and they must do what they are told. It's hard, but I just pray that nothing ever happens to her as a result of vaccines. :-(

emmy526
by New Owner on Mar. 8, 2014 at 3:47 PM
1 mom liked this

Unless i directly hear someone spewing misinformation, i stay out of the conversation.  The best way to have a come back for someone is to know what kind of scientific answer to provide.  One of our members has a pamphlet that is helpful for situations, or to leave about in public places..here is the link to it

http://vaccinechoice.webs.com/vaccinechoicepamphlet.htm

emmy526
by New Owner on Mar. 8, 2014 at 3:49 PM

Another comeback is to simply say to people to look up the facts in the CDC Pink Book - everything is in there, too...

nicki.hemingway
by Bronze Member on Mar. 9, 2014 at 12:30 AM
1 mom liked this

The closest I've gotten is informing someone that their child's reaction (their post about their child's high pitched screaming post DtaP) was an abnormal reaction and that they needed to go to the ER and make sure their child was ok.  In the end their child's O2 was low and they had an overnight with no side effects.  I can't help but feel that it could have been much worse.

emmy526
by New Owner on Mar. 9, 2014 at 9:39 AM
1 mom liked this

heres another study out of england, concluding tylenol after MMR could be causing autism...mention this in the USA, and you'll get laughed at...funny that other countries will recognize adverse events, and reactions and admit when it happens...not so in the USA...you have to go to court to prove something happened to your child

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18445737


Quote:

Acetaminophen (paracetamol) use, measles-mumps-rubella vaccination, and autistic disorder: the results of a parent survey.

Abstract

The present study was performed to determine whether acetaminophen (paracetamol) use after the measles-mumps-rubella vaccination could be associated with autistic disorder. This case-control study used the results of an online parental survey conducted from 16 July 2005 to 30 January 2006, consisting of 83 children with autistic disorder and 80 control children. Acetaminophen use after measles-mumps-rubella vaccination was significantly associated with autistic disorder when considering children 5 years of age or less (OR 6.11, 95% CI 1.42-26.3), after limiting cases to children with regression in development (OR 3.97, 95% CI 1.11-14.3), and when considering only children who had post-vaccination sequelae (OR 8.23, 95% CI 1.56-43.3), adjusting for age, gender, mother's ethnicity, and the presence of illness concurrent with measles-mumps-rubella vaccination. Ibuprofen use after measles-mumps-rubella vaccination was not associated with autistic disorder. This preliminary study found that acetaminophen use after measles-mumps-rubella vaccination was associated with autistic disorder.

PMID:
 
18445737
 
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Isabelles_mommy
by Bronze Member on Mar. 9, 2014 at 10:22 AM
1 mom liked this

It's very hard to tell ppl that what they think is right, is actually wrong. Some ppl take it as a slap in the face, that they are raising their kids wrong. I try to be spread truth, but in the past I've learned to keep it at a minimum and watch and see how the ppl are before I jump in with non-vax info. Usually I let my friends and family know we are non-vax and see how they react to that first. 
I have seen many issues in children that could of been reactions or caused by vaccines. I feel horrible and wish I could scoop them up and make their parents see the truth, but like the says, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink. We can show studies, info and facts from every source under the sun, but only will they change, is if they start doing their own research, that when they actually want to learn and will absorb the info.

I've had family members in the past ask me questions, just b/c they know I'm non vax and yes I don't mind giving info and trying to help, but always try to get them to look up some info, so they start researching. I let them know I got a notebook and jotted all my findings in it. Books are great gifts, so if they ever want to read it, they have a starting point, especially if they are on the fence or ask about info. 

This is how I usually deal with it.

Sometimes I run into that pro-vaxer who wants to debate. I first let them know that nomatter what they say, it's not going to make me change my ways and start vaxing. I've done the research and the bad out weighs the good in my family. We've had some bad reactions in my extended family and I don't want my child to go through that, just for a "maybe the vax will work"  Then If they want to continue, then I'll say my info. I've even had ppl say I'm selfish, b/c there are children who can't get vax b/c of some health issues and my child will spread the illness. These ppl really infuriate me. They actually believe that herding works vaccines. I simply explain that herding only works on those who contacted the natural wild virus, b/c they get life long immunity. If you get a vax, you have a chance that the vax won't take b/c you don't develope enough antibodies from the illness, so you have a false sense of security, then u will catch it and spread the illness. Also after X amount of years the vaccine wears off and if you don't get the booster when it does, you could spread the illness as well. So I'm sorry, herding only works with natural wild viruses that if you catch them, you are 100% immune to that illness for life.

 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)