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Birth Plan and Vitamin K Shot

Posted by on May. 24, 2009 at 2:55 PM
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I probably sound really stupid b/c I have two kids and know nothing about what I'm going to ask but.....what is a birth plan?  I have never had one and never heard of one.  How do I prepare a birth plan? 

Also, has anyone had or heard of any side effects of the Vitamin K shot?  I know it may possibly be related to cancer but I'm talking about any immediate side effects.  I don't think I am going to get it for my child...I am going to breastfeed and take Vitamin K supplements.  Is that what I should do?  Sorry I sound very clueless but I can't find very many articles on it, or at least ones that are credible on the internet.  Thanks!!!

by on May. 24, 2009 at 2:55 PM
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StarsChildren
by on May. 24, 2009 at 2:59 PM

The Vit K shot I believe is for the blood, help it to thicken up and clot if need be. I could be wrong though. I know I refused the Vit K cream for the eyes of the baby when he was born...I would probably refuse the shot too.

The birth plan is like outlining your wants and what you refuse during labor/birth (no shots, no interventions unless cleared by me first, I will birth in this position, no Ivs, hands off and let my body take over, so on and so forth). Atleast it was for me and my midwife (i birthed at home, so there were a lot less restrictions and more chance I got what I wanted), I outlined how I planned to birth, where I planned it, what I was ok with and what I was not ok with.

Loa1002
by Silver Member on May. 24, 2009 at 10:22 PM

A birth plan explains your wishes or guideline as to your birth such as taking care of you, taking care of baby before and after birth, how you labor, delivery etc. Just google birth plans to get an idea.

For me some areas were not negotiable such as my son was not to get circ'd nor was he to have eye goop, vit k shot, or the hep B vaccine. Big points in my birth plan. I wanted to walk during labor and not get pitocin but that did not happen according to my birth plan. Some times you have to flexible but I was also not as knowledgeable as I am now. I would have done things ALOT differently.

Vit K shot--that is given with a day of birth. It has been linked to death and childhood leukemia. I have a word doc about it but I am on a different computer and I wont be home until Thursday. You can eat foods rich in vitamin k or you can go to www.birthwithlove.comand get natural vitamin k supplements.

In the hospital they told me it was for bleeding in the brain and to help it clot. They pressured me multiple times and by multiple people. I nursed my son and ate as much good healthy food as I could. What they did not tell me was that the shot is 100 times more than what a 6-9 pound baby can handle and that you can eat foods rich in vit k like beets, kale, spinach and broccoli.

here is a site

http://www.vaughns-1-pagers.com/food/vitamin-k-foods.htm

you can look through and see other posts on vit k but if you cant find them I will post my word doc on Thursday.

 

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on May. 25, 2009 at 11:36 AM

With a home birth a birth plan is not necessary unless you want to have one in reserve if you have to transfer good.

gmapoohz
by Member on May. 25, 2009 at 12:24 PM


Quoting StarsChildren:

The Vit K shot I believe is for the blood, help it to thicken up and clot if need be. I could be wrong though. I know I refused the Vit K cream for the eyes of the baby when he was born...I would probably refuse the shot too.

Hello,

FYI, the cream the hospitals put into newborn's eyes is not Vit K, it is an antibiotic cream to prevent blindness in the baby in case the mother has been exposed to one or more of several veneral diseases. In the past they put silver nitrate drops in babies eyes, but that is not done anymore as there are potential dangers from the silver nitrate drops.

Unless both parents were virigins and monogomous before mom giving birth there is a risk of mom having been exposed to a veneral disease. Obviously it's not a good idea to depend upon total honesty and/or memory of both parents on such a delicate subject  for something so important as preventing blindness, so they give it to all babies unless the parents refuse. 

Gma Poohz

gmapoohz
by Member on May. 25, 2009 at 12:38 PM

Quoting yayay15

Also, has anyone had or heard of any side effects of the Vitamin K shot?  I know it may possibly be related to cancer but I'm talking about any immediate side effects.  I don't think I am going to get it for my child...I am going to breastfeed and take Vitamin K supplements.  Is that what I should do?  Sorry I sound very clueless but I can't find very many articles on it, or at least ones that are credible on the internet.  Thanks!!!

I have posted the following before, but I don't recall if it was in this group.

In my opinion, there is no valid reason for giving the Vit K shot to a newborn baby, the potential dangers are many, including some researchers who believe there may be a link to childhood leukemia.  Even if that is not true, I see no reason to take a chance.

Babies are born without Vit K (or very, very little) which is important to have for blood clotting. Should a situation arise involving bleeding, especially in baby's brain, before baby has had time to develop adequate levels of Vit K, this can be life threatening.

It is commonly accepted that mother ingesting foods high in Vit K prior to birth does not tranfer Vit K to baby in utero and mother ingesting foods high in Vit K after birth can help via breastmilk to baby, but this method alone may not be enough to protect baby in the first 2 months. The simple solution for protection is to administer Vit K drops to baby.

You can let the hospital know you will be administering Vit K drops or you can tell the hospital to purchase the drops in advance to administer. The latest recommendations I read is 1 to 2 drops at birth, then 1-2 drops at one month and 1 drop at 8 weeks.  You cannot bring your own drops to the hospital, they can only allow anything to be administered that they have procured themselves.  If you make this request and they do not follow through, you can continue to refuse the Vit K shot and tell them you will administer the Vit K drops when you get your baby home. You can buy the drops on line, but you can't purchase them in the U.S. without a doctor's Rx.

Another reason for refusing the Vit K injection is that it has been established, I don't have my sources on it handy, that oral Vit K is best when giving Vit K for any reason, to babies or adults. Vit K needs to go thru the digestive system, and there is concern by other physicians and researchers that synthetic Vit K, which is in the injection, cannot be absorbed easily and shouldn't be given at all.  Also other physicians and researchers say that the dose from the Vit K injection given in hospitals is way too high.

Hospitals know Vit K injections can cause jaundice and they NEVER warn parents - they should especially warn parents who are going to bottle feed, for whatever reason, due to formula contains high amounts of Vit K and combined with the Vit K injection is ridiculous overload.

Other causes of jaundice in newborns are: premature delivery, spinal medication for pain, and any baby who is asian or part asian.  Our grandbaby had all the above factors and received the Vit K shot, she was very jaundice and had to go back to the hospital for treatment.

A jaundice baby is very lethargic and sleepy and may have trouble getting the hang of breast feeding, it is very scary and difficult for parents who get told to keep feeding often and try to keep the baby awake, the baby does not interact with mommy much due to being lethargic and this can delay bonding with mommy which makes even more stress for mommy.  Not something you want to go through if you can avoid it.

Hope that is helpful and gives you some starting points to check out info.

Gma Poohz

StarsChildren
by on May. 25, 2009 at 12:51 PM


Quoting gmapoohz:


Quoting StarsChildren:

The Vit K shot I believe is for the blood, help it to thicken up and clot if need be. I could be wrong though. I know I refused the Vit K cream for the eyes of the baby when he was born...I would probably refuse the shot too.

Hello,

FYI, the cream the hospitals put into newborn's eyes is not Vit K, it is an antibiotic cream to prevent blindness in the baby in case the mother has been exposed to one or more of several veneral diseases. In the past they put silver nitrate drops in babies eyes, but that is not done anymore as there are potential dangers from the silver nitrate drops.

Unless both parents were virigins and monogomous before mom giving birth there is a risk of mom having been exposed to a veneral disease. Obviously it's not a good idea to depend upon total honesty and/or memory of both parents on such a delicate subject  for something so important as preventing blindness, so they give it to all babies unless the parents refuse. 

Gma Poohz

I didn't have my son in a hospital, had him at home with a midwife... And I concede I probably remembered wrong about the cream, I could have swore it was a vit K cream, but then again its been a while since I was pregnant and planning the birth and I could be remembering wrong. That was one reason our ds was a homebirth, I don't trust hospitals, they are notorious for doing things without parents permission because it is the routine to do it and they don't think to ask first.

Thank you for correcting me though, I appreciate it... I will write that down now, so I know for future reference.


ThinkTwice08
by Bronze Member on May. 26, 2009 at 2:50 AM

This is information from Dr. Tenpenny...she is an expert on vaccines....


Vitamin K is given to newborns to prevent a rare form of blood disease. First identified in 1894, Hemorrhagic Disease of the Newborn (HDN) is a bleeding disorder associated with low levels of vitamin K in newborn babies. It is thought to occur in approximately 1 in every 10,000 infants.

Vitamin K is a group name for several related compounds. The two most common are phylloquinone (also known as vitamin K1 ) and menaquinone ( vitamin K2 ). However, the vitamin K administered to newborns in the hospital is a synthetic form of vitamin K, called phytomenadione.

There are three types of HDN. Early onset HDN occurs in the first 24 hours, is very rare and mainly associated with mothers who have taken anticonvulsant, antibiotic, antituberculous or anticoagulant drugs during pregnancy. Classic HDN occurs in the first week after birth. It is manifested by the oozing of blood and bruising at sites without trauma. Late onset HDN occurs after the first week, with a peak incidence between the second and sixth weeks, and about half the cases present with intracranial bleeding (bleeding into the brain).

Beginning in the 1950s, and in spite of no long term trials of these preparations, the American Academy of Pediatrics began to recommend that phytomenadione be administered prophylactic ally to all newborn babies. (Vail, B. Vitamin K prophylaxis and hemorrhagic disease of the newborn. ICEA Review 1985;9.)

Vitamin K shots contain PEG-35 castor oil, a solvent. Studies in animals given polyethoxylated castor oil have shown a severe anaphylactic reaction associated with histamine release. Strong circumstantial evidence implicates polyethoxylated castor oil in similar reactions in humans. This synthetic, injectable vitamin K formulation was never subjected to a randomized, controlled trial. There are no long term studies on the effects of this drug on newborn babies.

A better way for an infant to have enough Vitamin K at birth are to ensure that the mother eats large quantities of food that contain natural forms of Vitamin K, such as alfalfa, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collard and turnip greens, spinach, broccoli, asparagus, oats and green tea. (For a good, well referenced discussion on this topic, see http://www.vaclib.org/basic/vitamin-k.htm)


Christian- Libertarian, NON-vaxing, Natural child birthing, Breastfeeding, Non-circumsizing, Earth- friendly, mom of  One Happy, Healthy baby boy! big smile mini

yayay15
by Member on May. 26, 2009 at 12:00 PM

Thanks everyone for the info....If I decide to supplement myself with vitamins instead of getting the vitamin K shot or drops...should I bring them to the hospital?

gmapoohz
by Member on May. 26, 2009 at 11:38 PM

 

Quoting yayay15:

Thanks everyone for the info....If I decide to supplement myself with vitamins instead of getting the vitamin K shot or drops...should I bring them to the hospital?

I posted a reply, then realized I didn't read your question carefully enough. I see that you are talking about getting Vit K to your baby only via your breastmilk and taking vitamins and/or eating as much Vit K rich foods as you can after the birth.

This still puts your baby at some risk, although it is only 1 in 10,000 babies that have an incident of bleeding in the brain. My understanding is that you can't get enough Vit K to your baby fast enough thru breastmilk alone during the danger zone of the first 2-4 months, especially from birth to 2 weeks old.  Also, you don't want to assume your baby won't have trouble getting the hang of breastfeeding in the beginning.  Depending upon how the birth goes, a variety of things could interfere with early successful breastfeeding including if you end up with a C-section.

Still very important, if you decide to go with the Vit-K drops, you or someone else in your family or someone you designate must be with the baby at all times.  I have heard of many instances of hospital staff giving the Vit K injection even though the parents have provided a written refusal. You can't do anything about it if that happens and you can't "un-inject" your baby.  Do not trust any hospital staff to abide by any of your requests or refusals, even if you have provided them in writing.

Gma Poohz :-)

SElsner
by Member on May. 27, 2009 at 8:21 AM

I had homebirths with all three of mine, and I passed on the cream and the shot for all!  The shot has been linked to anemia and cancers.  My boys were circumcised tho I just waited til the 8th day and a Rabbi performed it!  No need for Vitamin K, the blood clots on its own on the 8th day! 

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