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To Rh Negative Moms...need advice!

Posted by on Jul. 24, 2009 at 4:28 PM
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Hi! I am Rh negative and am pregnant with my second child. According to my doctor, the blood tests show that I am not sensitized to the Rh factor, but she is insisting still that I get the rhogam shot at 28 weeks. I would prefer to wait and see what blood type the baby has.

After researching the shot, I am terrified!! I had to have it in the hospital after my son was born, but I don't want to do it while pregnant, considering it is a blood product and could potentially carry viruses, etc, plus the ingredient list adds to my concern. According to what I've read, they had to take the mercury out in 2001, but I've seen lots of more recent testimonials of women who's kids ended up with autism and that's the shot they've had.

Help! Has anyone refused the rhogam during pregnancy?
by on Jul. 24, 2009 at 4:28 PM
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Replies (1-10):
asaffell
by Member on Jul. 24, 2009 at 4:52 PM

I refuse the 28 week shot. If there were an issue, like a traumatic accident or miscarriage where the fetal blood would enter your blood supply, you would still have 72 hours to get the injection anyway. This is from Ina May Gaskin's Guide to Childbirth, and I think it's really the best breadth of information about the prenatal RHogam injection.

"If your blood type is Rh-negative, you live in the United States, and your maternity care is closer to the techno-medical model than the midwifery model, it is likely that you will be urged to accept a Rhogam injection at 28 and 34 weeks of gestation, regardless of whether your baby is Rh negative or Rh positive. The rationale for this prenatal administration of Rhogam (which is controversial internationally) is that some argue that this is the best means of preventing the few cases of "silent" sensitization that may occur during pregnancy. One study showed a fall in the sensitization rate from 1.12 percent (without routine prenatal Rhogam) to 0.28 percent (with prenatal Rhogam), but critics have pointed out that this fall may be attributable to other factors such as failure to offer Rhogam to women with risk factors during pregnancy. The problem with routine prescription of prenatal Rhogam is that many babies who are Rh negative like their mothers will be exposed to the drug, and there has been no systematic study of the long-term effects of this product in babies.

In my own practice, my partners and I - like many other midwives - do not advise women to accept Rhogam prenatally unless there has been a traumatizing event."

Ina May Gaskin. Ina May's Guide to Childbirth. Pages 199-201.

Technology has turned the fetus into a patient, reducing the mother to being the 'maternal environment' and preventing attachment until after the ultrasound has shown the fetus to be 'normal.'

-Jennifer Hall

 

BREASTFEEDING IS NOT ADULT NATURED! 

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on Jul. 24, 2009 at 4:55 PM

Is the father RH+? I ask, because many doctors don't bother to find out, assume you are lying, or you're cheating on your dh.

Up until recently, it was standard in Western Europe to only give the shot after birth and their rate of sensitization was no higher than ours.

In anycase, whether you do or not will not affect this pregnancy (other than the ingredients) but subsequent pregnancies.


You can read this book.

LisaGrehn
by Member on Jul. 25, 2009 at 9:24 AM

OK I am confused, this shot is BAD??  Both my sister in laws have had miscarriages on their 2nd child BECAUSE THEY WERE RH- and NEVER got the shot.  My husband is A+ and I am A- and our son is A+ so I had the shot at 26 weeks and then again after he was born, there doesnt seem to be any side effects that he has experienced.  Is this shot bad at 26 weeks???? 

kk_bella
by on Jul. 25, 2009 at 9:37 AM

This is a topic I did not know much about until after my second pregnancy. I got the shot both times.

Knowing what I know now, I would probably not get the shot until AFTER delivery when the baby was tested.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/144056/a_natural_approach_to_pregnancy_and_pg3_pg3.html?cat=5

http://www.whale.to/a/rh1.html

http://www.unhinderedliving.com/rhogam.html

kk_bella
by on Jul. 25, 2009 at 9:40 AM


Quoting LisaGrehn:

OK I am confused, this shot is BAD??  Both my sister in laws have had miscarriages on their 2nd child BECAUSE THEY WERE RH- and NEVER got the shot.  My husband is A+ and I am A- and our son is A+ so I had the shot at 26 weeks and then again after he was born, there doesnt seem to be any side effects that he has experienced.  Is this shot bad at 26 weeks???? 

Usually, the shot is given at 28 weeks, however, you should decide for yourself whether or not the shot is bad, or even neccesary. If you ever find yoursef needing to make the decision, just google the crap out of it.

First, the only danger of Rh negative is that you and the baby's blood might mix.

There are some specific instances where this might happen. Amniocentesis, cutting the umbilical cord right away, forced removal of the placenta, miscarriage. Outside of these instances, it is highly unlikely that your blood will mix.

So, you really have to decide for yourself if you need it/want it.

I know a lot of people say, "Better safe than sorry". I don't agree with that. i think that a lot of the time the things that people think make you 'safer' are what actually make you sorry.

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on Jul. 25, 2009 at 10:18 AM


Quoting LisaGrehn:

OK I am confused, this shot is BAD??  Both my sister in laws have had miscarriages on their 2nd child BECAUSE THEY WERE RH- and NEVER got the shot. 

I'm confused.

They were both tested for Rh sensitivity?

Being Rh negative does not cause miscarriage.

If the mother is Rh negative and the father is Rh positive, and their child is Rh positive, and there is mixing of their blood (small chance), and they become sensitized, it can cause problems in subsequent pregnancies, but miscarriage is not automatic; I can't even find studies or stats on Rh sensitivity and miscarriage. There is far more information on Rh sensitivity and subsequent pregnancies.

Jessy0419
by on Jul. 25, 2009 at 10:58 AM

I would have your husband get tested.  I say that now after having had 10 (yes 10) Rhogam injections, 2 during each of my 4 full term pregnancies (8) and 1 after 2 of my 3 miscarriages (2 more).  I will also add that I never researched it for myself even though I had stopped vaccinating prior to my last pregnancy.  All four of my children have a + blood type.  Also, they took blood from me to make my Rhogam (at least that's what they said) when I had one after delivery.

I say all of this to say just research it and do what seems right to you but know that there's a risk with everything.

                           





Jessy; born again Christian, married to my best friend, SAHM of 4, breastfeeding, baby wearing, non-vaxxing Mama and PROUD of it!         


           

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on Jul. 25, 2009 at 12:13 PM


Quoting Jessy0419:

Also, they took blood from me to make my Rhogam (at least that's what they said) when I had one after delivery.

They made that up. Rhogam is made from human plasma containing anti-D. You don't have it--hence the shot.

happytexasCM
by Gold Member on Jul. 25, 2009 at 12:31 PM

Rhogam Product Insert (pg4)

Rhogam puts a small amount of antibody into the mother's body, effectively "fooling" her body into thinking that the problem has been taken care of.

Rhogam must be given within 72 hours of the trauma. After that the body will have begun making its own antibodies and the Rhogam won't work.

The 72 hour limit means that any shot given in the prenatal period is probably arbitrary, and the date of the standard antinatal dose has been chosen with the hope that it may protect some babies.


Kimra
by Member on Jul. 25, 2009 at 12:45 PM

i'm rh negative and i refused my 28 week rhogam shot...instead i had my blood draw to see if our blood had mixed...they hadnt mixed...after i had my baby our blood DID mix, i think this was because i had a previous miscarriage and an EXTREMELY long labor 56 hours + ...i got lucky that we are both okay...i know that the mixing of blood is VERY RARE but it happened to me...next time i will get the rhogam shot, even though it isn't vegan (i am vegan)...i will do what it takes to protect me and my future unborn child better than this time...i don't want to take any chances

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