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What made you question the existence of God?

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You don't believe in God? 

YOU DON'T BELIEVE IN GOD?! 

You can do that?

"The world is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion," Founding Father Thomas Paine.

 

by on Jul. 29, 2009 at 1:48 AM
Replies (121-124):
crazyblondemom
by Member on May. 12, 2014 at 9:37 AM
1 mom liked this
It happened when I was exploring myself when I moved out on my own. Went through a pagan phase then I moved on from that and got into more science stuff. My friend actually introduced me to the symphony of science videos on YouTube. Those are bad ass. I started reading the earth chronicles by Zachariah Stitchen. Learned more about aliens and all sorts of random stuff. I found that a god or goddess was just a comforting thought for those who couldn't take responsibility for their own lives and needed something to keep them on track.
armywifey1983
by Member on May. 12, 2014 at 9:56 PM

My siblings and I were raised Roman Catholic, though I was the only one baptized. Just one year ago (I'm 30 now), I learned why.

*Beware, the next bit of info can be seen as disturbing for some.*

I was born 3 weeks early, and was immediately diagnosed with Spina Bifida and hydrocephalus (fluid on the brain). I had surgery at an hour old to fix a literal hole in my back that exposed my spine (a symptom of moderate to severe Spina Bifida). That night as I recovered, the doctors told my parents that I needed a second surgery immediately, to put a shunt in my head to drain the excess fluid away from it into the rest of my body. My mom immediately called her pastor, and they performed my baptism in her recovery room.

When the pastor was finished and had packed up to leave, he leaned toward my mom and whispered 'you know that doesn't count, right? She still needs to be baptized for real within the church walls.' My mom, having been a devout Christian her entire life, crumpled in a heap at this. When the pastor left, my dad saw how devastated she was and said 'no. We're not going back. Emergency baptisms happen all the time, and they're 'legit'. Why the f?!# wasn't this one 'real'?! Inexcusable!'

I remember only a handful of times we actually went to church, and that was because my mom still clung to the idea that my siblings and I 'needed it'. Until I was 8 and questioned the teacher in Sunday school a few too many times. 'Why?' isn't a question they like to hear, I guess. And what 8 year old accepts the answer 'because'?

We were allowed to make our own decisions growing up, and were encouraged to accept offers to attend mass with friends, no matter their religion. Unfortunately, we grew up in a predominantly Christian neighborhood, so we never had the exposure of anything different.

FrogSalad
by Susie K-M on May. 13, 2014 at 4:55 AM

 

Quoting armywifey1983:

My siblings and I were raised Roman Catholic, though I was the only one baptized. Just one year ago (I'm 30 now), I learned why.

*Beware, the next bit of info can be seen as disturbing for some.*

I was born 3 weeks early, and was immediately diagnosed with Spina Bifida and hydrocephalus (fluid on the brain). I had surgery at an hour old to fix a literal hole in my back that exposed my spine (a symptom of moderate to severe Spina Bifida). That night as I recovered, the doctors told my parents that I needed a second surgery immediately, to put a shunt in my head to drain the excess fluid away from it into the rest of my body. My mom immediately called her pastor, and they performed my baptism in her recovery room.

When the pastor was finished and had packed up to leave, he leaned toward my mom and whispered 'you know that doesn't count, right? She still needs to be baptized for real within the church walls.' My mom, having been a devout Christian her entire life, crumpled in a heap at this. When the pastor left, my dad saw how devastated she was and said 'no. We're not going back. Emergency baptisms happen all the time, and they're 'legit'. Why the f?!# wasn't this one 'real'?! Inexcusable!'

I remember only a handful of times we actually went to church, and that was because my mom still clung to the idea that my siblings and I 'needed it'. Until I was 8 and questioned the teacher in Sunday school a few too many times. 'Why?' isn't a question they like to hear, I guess. And what 8 year old accepts the answer 'because'?

We were allowed to make our own decisions growing up, and were encouraged to accept offers to attend mass with friends, no matter their religion. Unfortunately, we grew up in a predominantly Christian neighborhood, so we never had the exposure of anything different.

 OMB, that makes me livid (what the priest said to your mom).  Grrr!

I can't even imagine how devastated your parents were, especially on top of the stress of having their newborn go through two surgeries.

I suppose there is an upside in that your folks quit going to church regularly and allowed you freedom to explore on your own, but that came at very high emotional cost for them. 


Atheist Mama?  Join us!

How paramount the future is to the present when one is surrounded by children.  Charles Darwin

moobles
by New Member on May. 28, 2014 at 10:52 AM
1 mom liked this
I'm undecided, but there a couple of personal observations I've made.

First off... Christian ideals go against human nature. Why would God create us as sinfully driven creatures and expect us to go against our instincts? Why would he create us with a thirst for knowledge, but expect us to follow this religion so blindly and ignore any factual evidence, or lack there of?

I was raised pretty lax as a Christian, so only recently in my adult life have I taken initiative to study the bible. Leviticus. From the very beginning, the bible drills fear into our hearts. Fear makes us vulnerable. Our God is an angry, jealous God who is not one to be tested. As the bible progresses, the fear in turn is conditioned into love and protection. The back and forth contradictions reflect that of a cycle of abuse. I ultimately feel a sense of distrust after dissecting the psychology of the bible, and the pattern of fear and love coincide with brainwashing.

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