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Homeschool and work full time?

Posted by on Dec. 12, 2012 at 11:45 PM
  • 15 Replies

I wasn't quite sure where to start a thread like this so I chose here.  I work full time 40+ hours a week.  I cannot quit or even go part time.  My SO has a decent job but my benefits are better so I carry the insurance etc etc.  Anyway since about third grade my daughter has been on a nightmare rollercoaster of schools and teachers.  I keep getting railroaded on the IEP process.....her IEP is currently only for Dyslexia though I gave them the Asperger's diagnosis back in August.  She is at the end of her 6th grade year.  I really feel like the school is just floating her through because she is a student that can't fit the curriculum etc.  I just learned today that her practice for reading fluency is like this:  a student in the SN class who has the same barriers she has, is listening to her read a passage and marks down when she misses a word or forgets to pause at the right places etc.  What special needs teacher in the world worth his/her credit would expect two children with the same barriers to be able to know if the other is doing it right or not!!!!!  My daughter has dyslexia as well as ASD so I know she would have trouble following along the paper and also hear if it has been read correctly.  And my daughter's IEP Goal is dependant on this kind of practice.  This is the blind leading the blind here!  So I am fed up with it.  I really want to homeschool her but I just don't know how to do that while working full time.  She can do very little work unsupervised and it would be hard to keep her on a schedule when I am at work.  Her dad is aspie too so he cannot be a co-teacher with me.  I cannot leave her to her own devices all day long then expect her to sit down and get serious those last three hours I have when I get home and expect her to want to work.  She has a very short attention span anyway and high anxiety.  And I can't expect her to get it all done on the weekends either.  I just don't know what to do.  She all ready knows she wants to have some kind of career in horses so I would rather center a home education around that.  But Missouri Home School requirements I hear are very strict on providing proof of work etc.  It would take the equivalent of a full time job to prepare all her lessons etc.  Sounds like I am talking myself out of it, lol  But I am heartbroken to see her struggling everyday and I see her giving up.  Any advice?  Any full timers who are making a go of homeschooling a SN child too? 

by on Dec. 12, 2012 at 11:45 PM
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Replies (1-10):
ohmandy
by Member on Dec. 12, 2012 at 11:51 PM
1 mom liked this

would you be able to look into like Monetessori schools or something with an alternative type curriculum?  I am a high school english teacher.  Special Ed is tough.  if its any consulation, the remedial reading program we use, "corrective reading" is very similar to what you described.  there are other, in my opinion, better programs out there.  

i couldnt imagine homeschooling and working fulltime.  i teach in the inner city so my view of public schools is skewed, even though i graduated from a good public school... it seems like forever ago.

i know in PA we have cyber charter schools, its like homeschooling meets regular school curriculum.  that might be something worth looking into.

SonamTsomo
by New Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 12:24 AM

They have Montessori schools in KC but that's too far from us and we can't relocate right now.  The corrective reading method is fine, my problem is that other kids with the same barriers are made responsible to do the correcting.  I'd like to know what the SN teacher is doing while the kids are doing this.  Maybe she is walking around and evaluating regularly while they are doing this I don't know.  That's not the only reason I am considering homeschooling.  It just doesn't sit right with me to have her sitting around idle with little structure waiting for me to get home.  I don't think I could change my hours either though.  My job does have a future potential of becoming a telecommuting job, but that is probably a couple years off.  I just wish they had apprenticeships like they back when my mom was growing up; if you didn't want to walk the mile to school or work on the farm with dad, you went to town and learned farrier, blacksmith, carpentry, etc under a veteran.  She excels with horses and I think I could get her excited about learning if the subject was horses.  You can do all subjects with horses as the theme and she might not even realize she is LEARNING :)  Just wish I could quit my job and start writing curriculum!  I went to school for Secondary Education in English but had to leave it and get a job.  I could write curriculum all day!

deccaf
by Platinum Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 12:28 AM
1 mom liked this
I got nothing but a bump for you.
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Marti123
by Platinum Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 9:52 AM

*hugs* I have no experience with this at all. So here's another bump for you.

And to add some support for you, I am tears weekly with my 3 yo,  due to his behavior and developmental difficulties. And your below statement really speaks to me,  I think all the time, how hard it will be in this society to raise y son. My Dad is a farmer and I know he would be unable to function in pretty much any other role, but he is the best farmer and inventor. I know my YDS would thrive climbing in barns, digging in dirt and probably caring for animals. But those jobs like you said ARE GONE; it's not safe. I can't let him run wild out in the backyard like they did 50 years ago. A college degree really helps your chance of success. It saddens me the 2012 necessary learning environment suffocates DS & other's like him, but there really are few alternatives.

If I find myself in your situation in the future, and I very well may, I would look hard and long for different school districts. If that was not an option, I would look for homeschooling moms in my church to take on a SN kid in their home for the money.

Good luck.

Quoting SonamTsomo:

 I just wish they had apprenticeships like they back when my mom was growing up; if you didn't want to walk the mile to school or work on the farm with dad, you went to town and learned farrier, blacksmith, carpentry, etc under a veteran.  She excels with horses and I think I could get her excited about learning if the subject was horses.  You can do all subjects with horses as the theme and she might not even realize she is LEARNING :)  Just wish I could quit my job and start writing curriculum!  I went to school for Secondary Education in English but had to leave it and get a job.  I could write curriculum all day!


the3Rs
by Platinum Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 10:01 AM

To be honest - and not to dampen your spirit - but I can't really  envision a scenario in which both parents working full time out of the home could homeschool their 3rd grader.  Where would she go during the day?  Who would watch her?

I do think you could fit school into a few hours a day as much of the regular school day is filled with lining up, lunch, recess, specials, etc., all of which are cut out when you homeschool.

I did homeschool for about 1 1/2 years.  I was working full time but it  was from home.  The first year we used the state virtual school (they provided all materials, curriculum and teachers who he met with regularly).  The rest of the time it was "normal" homeschool.  But, he missed his friends and honestly I wasn't able to provide the level of instruction necessary and still work full time.

Anyway, I wish you the best and hope you're able to figure it out.

(by the way, there are a lot of legit work at home jobs in instructional design/curriculum writing that might be a viable option for your career).

the3Rs
by Platinum Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 10:03 AM

Could you change your shift to 4 10 hour days or something like that?  That would give you 3 days at home to school - not sure where she would go on the work days though.  Just a thought...

oferrek
by New Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 10:04 AM


Quoting ohmandy:

would you be able to look into like Monetessori schools or something with an alternative type curriculum?  I am a high school english teacher.  Special Ed is tough.  if its any consulation, the remedial reading program we use, "corrective reading" is very similar to what you described.  there are other, in my opinion, better programs out there.  

i couldnt imagine homeschooling and working fulltime.  i teach in the inner city so my view of public schools is skewed, even though i graduated from a good public school... it seems like forever ago.

i know in PA we have cyber charter schools, its like homeschooling meets regular school curriculum.  that might be something worth looking into.

In FL we also have a virtual school and there are homeschool groups that go on field trips and stuff like that, I'm sure if you have something similar, one of the homeschool moms would be willing to take her on the trips and then she could do the work online as well.

momof2ex1
by Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 1:15 PM
What about a private school?
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NoahsCoolMama
by Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 4:09 PM


Quoting momof2ex1:

What about a private school?

This is what I was going to suggest. My son is in private school and he gets a lot of one-on-one with the teacher. She also has a few special needs children in her class and she changes her teaching methods to accommodate all of the students, especially the ones who are "visual learners" like my son. It is very cost, but I will tell you this---IT IS WORTH EVERY PENNY!!!!

cjsmom1
by Platinum Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 8:53 PM

We are currently homeschooling ds, he's in second grade. I am doing it through an online charted school K12. I work full-time outside the home, my ex has his own business and often works from my house, and my brother is currently living with me and doesn't work. If and when my brother finds a job I'll pay someone to come watch him during the day, like a babysitter. You would have to consider the cost of a sitter, if you'd want the sitter to help with homeschooling, and if you'd have the energy to help dd when you get home from work. Honestly though if it wasn't for my ex and brother I don't know how well things would have went.

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