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Immersion schools

Posted by on Jun. 17, 2014 at 5:29 PM
  • 19 Replies

We live in a rural area, I think most of you know that. Because of that, we are limited on the opportunities that our kids have for certain things.

I have a friend from high school who lives in "the city." Her 4-year-old was accepted into a French-immersion grade school in that city. My friend posts on Facebook all the time - things the kids are doing, etc.

I think it's great that the kids are learning a second language. I am happy that her kids have the opportunity to do that. I'm not trying to knock it. I'm just curious - Is it really necessary? Or is it something that parents made up under the guise of "it's better for the kids" but really it's more for parental status? Will her kids be "that" much better off than my kid? Am I doing my kid a horrible disservice and setting him up for life in poverty because he's only fluent in English? Wait! I'm only fluent in English and I'm ok......It's a topic that I have a lot of conflicting thoughts about.

Again - not knocking it. Just thought I'd bring it up for discussion and see what you guys all think.

by on Jun. 17, 2014 at 5:29 PM
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Replies (1-10):
calsmom62
by Silver Member on Jun. 17, 2014 at 10:28 PM
We have a two way immersion school here. Spanish speaking kids and spanish learners are in spanish language core subjects and english language subject classes together. It is most advantageous to the spanish language learners in the end. As for immersion our dd went to an unusual 3 language immersion school in elem and did very well. ds also went to a similar school but did not benefit as much, but I think dd just had a gift for languages . the younger two havent had immersion experience , just traditional language courses. For fluency I vote immersion but its not always practical or accessible.
arthistmom
by Bronze Member on Jun. 18, 2014 at 12:45 AM
1 mom liked this

Our older son attends a public foreign language magnet that employs the dual-language immersion model. He'll be in 4th grade in the fall while his younger sibling will start Kinder in the same program at the same school then. We believe that learning a language (and its accompanying culture) beyond our native English will be a valuable asset to them in the future they will be facing--one that is increasingly multilingual, multicultural, and global. We also thought that the language experience would provide an added dimension to their education. In the end, choosing to send one's child to a language immersion school is similar to any other educational choice parents make--like homeschooling, unschooling, private school, etc. It all comes down to belief in the philosophy and its suitability for one's children.

ljmom24
by Member on Jun. 18, 2014 at 8:59 AM

we have a spanish immersion school here. Its optional, if you go to that school you don't have to do the spanish immersion program. Its not run very well or at least wasn't a few years ago. Its actually the closest school to use (we have controlled school choice not neigborhood schools) but we choose a different school easier for my commute but all of our schools have a special theme and my oldest has a speech issue and speaking english was hard enough at 5. Couldn't see adding spanish so I wanted to be able to take advantage of theme so send him also to one I felt best suited him. I can see how learning Spanish is a good thing though. Although we have a higher Asian population then latino here, Spanish would come in handy in the future. Can't tell you how many times I get a spanish speaking person at work and I kick my self for choicing French not spanish in high school.

jenerica.
by Member on Jun. 18, 2014 at 2:47 PM

My dd participates in the dual-language program at her school.  We signed her up for her benefit, not our parental status. 

Marti123
by Platinum Member on Jun. 18, 2014 at 3:49 PM

There are lots of ways to educate children. I think it all depends on the child, the school, the teachers, the curriculum, the parents, the goals of the child & parents...............I would love to find a Spanish-immersion school, as my DH and I really feel that would benefit the boys in their future profession. But French really?? ehhh, not for us, But I really can't judge, as I pay a very high premium for my children's daycare/pre-school facility, because we prioritize it. Although you won't see me bragging about it on facebook, only bitching in this group about my budget at times, lol.

I have been surrounded by physicians, often making half a million dollars a year or more,  for a majority of career, and I was eating lunch with a orthopedic surgeon and discussing his family, his child, now grown. He proudly commented how she went to the Pembroke School, which is a quite expensive school in our area, and is certainly known for it's status, specifically because the public schools in our "suburban bubble" are ranked very high in the nation for their test scores and success. I was much younger without children, and I asked asked politely what great things his child was doing now, expecting her to be idk, setting the world on fire.......... She was a 2nd grade teacher in a public school. NOW, I think that is great, but I know plenty of teachers that are AWESOME and didn't need expensive private schools to reach their goal.................so it's just whatever works for your kiddos, but I wouldn't go as far as calling it a disservcie.

My DH is actually learning Spanish at age 40, so it is never too late.

Nighttiger
by Ashley on Jun. 19, 2014 at 2:07 PM
I agree with this. In addition, it's proven to be easier to learn another language the younger you are.

We looked into it but decided not to. The immersion schools in our area get low ratings and many parents comments attribute it to the fact that education is intertwined. Math is taught 100% in the language by 5th grade, so if your kid still struggles with the language, then they struggle with math as well.


Quoting arthistmom:

Our older son attends a public foreign language magnet that employs the dual-language immersion model. He'll be in 4th grade in the fall while his younger sibling will start Kinder in the same program at the same school then. We believe that learning a language (and its accompanying culture) beyond our native English will be a valuable asset to them in the future they will be facing--one that is increasingly multilingual, multicultural, and global. We also thought that the language experience would provide an added dimension to their education. In the end, choosing to send one's child to a language immersion school is similar to any other educational choice parents make--like homeschooling, unschooling, private school, etc. It all comes down to belief in the philosophy and its suitability for one's children.

okeydokie
by Member on Jun. 19, 2014 at 4:53 PM
Never heard of such a program.
DawnPratt23
by Member on Jun. 19, 2014 at 4:57 PM
Never heard of those, we have been getting different programs for kids online. Just started this year.
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DawnPratt23
by Member on Jun. 19, 2014 at 5:02 PM
Bought this program for Spanish, they have different options on there. http://www.petralingua.com/

Got these two for free to review on my blog.

https://www.tomoson.com/promotions/view/sabor-spanish-learning-songs-review

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00HHGI5RA

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mommy2adandykid
by New Member on Jun. 19, 2014 at 5:04 PM
1 mom liked this

i'll be honest, it really IS better for the kid.  not knocking you or anything cause i live in a rural area as well but i wish 2nd languages were taught much earlier in school than they are currently.  when i was in HS(10years ago) that's when they started 2nd language.  now, it's 7/8th grade.  that's still not early enough though.  my cousin worked for a school like that for YEARS and they're amazing schools and i wish they were available in more places.  kids not knowing a 2nd language is a USA issue-most other industrialized countries teach english as a 2nd language from early grades and especially in Europe, most students graduate knowing more than just their country's language.  it's sad that we as a country are so far behind and it's going to hurt our kids down the line.

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