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We live in a rural area, I think most of you know that. Because of that, we are limited on the opportunities that our kids have for certain things.

I have a friend from high school who lives in "the city." Her 4-year-old was accepted into a French-immersion grade school in that city. My friend posts on Facebook all the time - things the kids are doing, etc.

I think it's great that the kids are learning a second language. I am happy that her kids have the opportunity to do that. I'm not trying to knock it. I'm just curious - Is it really necessary? Or is it something that parents made up under the guise of "it's better for the kids" but really it's more for parental status? Will her kids be "that" much better off than my kid? Am I doing my kid a horrible disservice and setting him up for life in poverty because he's only fluent in English? Wait! I'm only fluent in English and I'm ok......It's a topic that I have a lot of conflicting thoughts about.

Again - not knocking it. Just thought I'd bring it up for discussion and see what you guys all think.

by on Jun. 17, 2014 at 5:29 PM
Replies (11-19):
nomadbrat83
by Member on Jun. 20, 2014 at 11:40 AM

 Our DD isn't in a language immersion school, but does attend an IB school elementary magnet school where foreign language and international cultural is an intregal part of the curriculum (along with Strings). I always attended schools where foreign language started in pre-school and I want the same for my children. It is not a status symbol, it is an important asset in general and especially in today's international world. Also living in FL, being bilingual is practically required for many jobs here (typically Spanish or Creole).

adamsmom0116
by Gold Member on Jun. 20, 2014 at 3:01 PM

 I am familiar with the Pembroke School. This story is exactly what keeps going through my head. I understand the value of knowing a second language, and I understand that it is easier to learn when you're younger. But....how many of these kids really USE the second language? Is it really necessary?

Now, don't get me wrong. I paid through the nose for my son's private daycare and preschool. I would do it again in a heartbeat. I'm not talking about quality of education or whether or not it's helpful to know a second language. I'm talking about - Is it really necessary? Have I completely screwed over my son by not living in an area where he can attend one of these schools?

My friend's daughter is going to Academie Lafayette. To my knowledge, there's not really a great demand for fluent French in the KC area. I don't think.

Quoting Marti123:

There are lots of ways to educate children. I think it all depends on the child, the school, the teachers, the curriculum, the parents, the goals of the child & parents...............I would love to find a Spanish-immersion school, as my DH and I really feel that would benefit the boys in their future profession. But French really?? ehhh, not for us, But I really can't judge, as I pay a very high premium for my children's daycare/pre-school facility, because we prioritize it. Although you won't see me bragging about it on facebook, only bitching in this group about my budget at times, lol.

I have been surrounded by physicians, often making half a million dollars a year or more,  for a majority of career, and I was eating lunch with a orthopedic surgeon and discussing his family, his child, now grown. He proudly commented how she went to the Pembroke School, which is a quite expensive school in our area, and is certainly known for it's status, specifically because the public schools in our "suburban bubble" are ranked very high in the nation for their test scores and success. I was much younger without children, and I asked asked politely what great things his child was doing now, expecting her to be idk, setting the world on fire.......... She was a 2nd grade teacher in a public school. NOW, I think that is great, but I know plenty of teachers that are AWESOME and didn't need expensive private schools to reach their goal.................so it's just whatever works for your kiddos, but I wouldn't go as far as calling it a disservcie.

My DH is actually learning Spanish at age 40, so it is never too late.

 

arthistmom
by Bronze Member on Jun. 20, 2014 at 7:22 PM

I think only you can determine the necessity of this particular knowledge/skill in the life of your child. If you don't believe it's necessary, then it's not. 

Quoting adamsmom0116:

.  . .  But....how many of these kids really USE the second language? Is it really necessary?

Now, don't get me wrong. I paid through the nose for my son's private daycare and preschool. I would do it again in a heartbeat. I'm not talking about quality of education or whether or not it's helpful to know a second language. I'm talking about - Is it really necessary? Have I completely screwed over my son by not living in an area where he can attend one of these schools?

arthistmom
by Bronze Member on Jun. 20, 2014 at 7:34 PM

I find this statement interesting because I always thought that math concepts are beyond language and thus aren't limited by it. That is, the sum of 2 + 2 is the same in English as in Spanish, French, Italian, etc. And by the upper grades, the child should already know the numbers in the target language and the words for basic mathematical operations.

Quoting Nighttiger: I agree with this. In addition, it's proven to be easier to learn another language the younger you are. We looked into it but decided not to. The immersion schools in our area get low ratings and many parents comments attribute it to the fact that education is intertwined. Math is taught 100% in the language by 5th grade, so if your kid still struggles with the language, then they struggle with math as well.
Nighttiger
by Ashley on Jun. 20, 2014 at 10:55 PM
Honestly I was suprised too but that was the general parent feedback from this particular school. They teach both Mandrin and Spanish and they didnt specify which one. Their state scores are about 3 / 10 but that may be a different driving factor from the parents comments. Dh did read thay Asian countries teach math concepts differently so maybe thats a factor? This school was actually a top pick until I read the scores and reviews. Instead we are paying for a spanish tutor at his preschool.

Quoting arthistmom:

I find this statement interesting because I always thought that math concepts are beyond language and thus aren't limited by it. That is, the sum of 2 + 2 is the same in English as in Spanish, French, Italian, etc. And by the upper grades, the child should already know the numbers in the target language and the words for basic mathematical operations.

Quoting Nighttiger: I agree with this. In addition, it's proven to be easier to learn another language the younger you are.

We looked into it but decided not to. The immersion schools in our area get low ratings and many parents comments attribute it to the fact that education is intertwined. Math is taught 100% in the language by 5th grade, so if your kid still struggles with the language, then they struggle with math as well.
Nighttiger
by Ashley on Jun. 20, 2014 at 11:04 PM
You never know. Ive been sent international for work and would have loved to speak french or german!! Actually we have another project right now working with Germans. As an engineer, I rarely use high level calculus, but its there when I do need it. And if its accessible, why not. Ds1 is in an in home daycare but Im sharing the cost with his dcp to get a S American spanish tutor for the kids. $12 per hr and they skype in and play games. The dcp prints worksheets to go along with the instruction.

Quoting adamsmom0116:

 I am familiar with the Pembroke School. This story is exactly what keeps going through my head. I understand the value of knowing a second language, and I understand that it is easier to learn when you're younger. But....how many of these kids really USE the second language? Is it really necessary?


Now, don't get me wrong. I paid through the nose for my son's private daycare and preschool. I would do it again in a heartbeat. I'm not talking about quality of education or whether or not it's helpful to know a second language. I'm talking about - Is it really necessary? Have I completely screwed over my son by not living in an area where he can attend one of these schools?


My friend's daughter is going to Academie Lafayette. To my knowledge, there's not really a great demand for fluent French in the KC area. I don't think.


Quoting Marti123:

There are lots of ways to educate children. I think it all depends on the child, the school, the teachers, the curriculum, the parents, the goals of the child & parents...............I would love to find a Spanish-immersion school, as my DH and I really feel that would benefit the boys in their future profession. But French really?? ehhh, not for us, But I really can't judge, as I pay a very high premium for my children's daycare/pre-school facility, because we prioritize it. Although you won't see me bragging about it on facebook, only bitching in this group about my budget at times, lol.


I have been surrounded by physicians, often making half a million dollars a year or more,  for a majority of career, and I was eating lunch with a orthopedic surgeon and discussing his family, his child, now grown. He proudly commented how she went to the Pembroke School, which is a quite expensive school in our area, and is certainly known for it's status, specifically because the public schools in our "suburban bubble" are ranked very high in the nation for their test scores and success. I was much younger without children, and I asked asked politely what great things his child was doing now, expecting her to be idk, setting the world on fire.......... She was a 2nd grade teacher in a public school. NOW, I think that is great, but I know plenty of teachers that are AWESOME and didn't need expensive private schools to reach their goal.................so it's just whatever works for your kiddos, but I wouldn't go as far as calling it a disservcie.


My DH is actually learning Spanish at age 40, so it is never too late.


 

arthistmom
by Bronze Member on Jun. 21, 2014 at 2:23 AM

But I don't think this should have any bearing on how math is being taught in Mandarin at a US school since the school has to follow state education standards in the subject for a specific grade. The target language the math subject is being taught in is, in a way, irrelevant.

Quoting Nighttiger: Honestly I was suprised too but that was the general parent feedback from this particular school. They teach both Mandrin and Spanish and they didnt specify which one. Their state scores are about 3 / 10 but that may be a different driving factor from the parents comments. Dh did read thay Asian countries teach math concepts differently so maybe thats a factor? This school was actually a top pick until I read the scores and reviews. Instead we are paying for a spanish tutor at his preschool.
Nighttiger
by Ashley on Jun. 21, 2014 at 10:35 AM
Honestly IDK. What I do know is the public immersion schools in our area get very low ratings (3/10) as opposed to the regular public that are rated 7 or 8 both based on test scores. Something is off with ours and those are the parents comments

Quoting arthistmom:

But I don't think this should have any bearing on how math is being taught in Mandarin at a US school since the school has to follow state education standards in the subject for a specific grade. The target language the math subject is being taught in is, in a way, irrelevant.

Quoting Nighttiger: Honestly I was suprised too but that was the general parent feedback from this particular school. They teach both Mandrin and Spanish and they didnt specify which one. Their state scores are about 3 / 10 but that may be a different driving factor from the parents comments. Dh did read thay Asian countries teach math concepts differently so maybe thats a factor? This school was actually a top pick until I read the scores and reviews. Instead we are paying for a spanish tutor at his preschool.
Marz31
by Silver Member on Jun. 21, 2014 at 12:53 PM

we have quite a few in our metro area, never considered it for our daughter because neither DH nor I speak anything else, so we wouldn't be able to help reinforce it at home. French, Spanish and Russian are popular, I'm sure there are others as well. 

My daughter just finished up preschool where she had two Spanish speaking teachers and they focused on that quite a bit, it's kinda cool if you ask me. 

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