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Quitting by text........

Posted by on Sep. 4, 2014 at 3:37 PM
  • 13 Replies

We hired a new professor to teach one of our graduate science based courses. She has a doctoral degree from a respected state university. After the first week of class, she sends A TEXT MESSAGE, stating she can no longer meet the obligations and will not be teaching................ so she literally resigned via text message.

How crazy unprofessional is that? and just one more class to scramble and help teach & add to the ever increasing work load, so frustrating..........

by on Sep. 4, 2014 at 3:37 PM
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Replies (1-10):
deccaf
by Platinum Member on Sep. 4, 2014 at 3:53 PM

Ummmmm, yeah, not professional in the least!

MindPalace
by Bronze Member on Sep. 4, 2014 at 4:26 PM

Wow, that is truly surprising coming from someone who surely has some professional sense. What a low move! 

adamsmom0116
by Gold Member on Sep. 4, 2014 at 4:46 PM

OMG! For someone in that position to quit via text.....that's terrible!

arthistmom
by Bronze Member on Sep. 4, 2014 at 8:08 PM

Absolutely unprofessional. What, she couldn't muster a one-line e-mail stating her resignation?

lisahappymom
by Member on Sep. 4, 2014 at 9:05 PM

Yes, I agree that a text is absolutely not the way to leave a job. Just to play devil's advocate and give her the benefit of the doubt, maybe she had a situation at home with a child, spouse, or parent who is ill and needs her care?  She also might just have felt so bad about having to renege on her decision to work for you at the last minute that she was too ashamed to do it in person or even over the phone.  Either way, I'm so sorry that you have to scramble to find a replacement.  Hope it works out!

trfgirl56701
by Melissa on Sep. 5, 2014 at 8:25 AM

That's completely unprofessional but I kind of agree with lisahappymom. Maybe there was something going on that she wasn't thinking straight. I hope you are able to get it straightened out soon.

Marti123
by Platinum Member on Sep. 5, 2014 at 9:02 AM
I do try not to judge in these situations, and my first question was. "Did we not offer her enough support?" but even ashamed and under mental duress, there is no excuse for texting a resignation! It is just so unprofessional in our culture, completely burning a bridge in the world of academia. She hopes to continue teaching, but this will be a huge albatross to her. An so silly, when an email or phone call take similar amount of effort!

Quoting lisahappymom:

Yes, I agree that a text is absolutely not the way to leave a job. Just to play devil's advocate and give her the benefit of the doubt, maybe she had a situation at home with a child, spouse, or parent who is ill and needs her care?  She also might just have felt so bad about having to renege on her decision to work for you at the last minute that she was too ashamed to do it in person or even over the phone.  Either way, I'm so sorry that you have to scramble to find a replacement.  Hope it works out!

Marti123
by Platinum Member on Sep. 5, 2014 at 9:03 AM
I know right??!??

Quoting arthistmom:

Absolutely unprofessional. What, she couldn't muster a one-line e-mail stating her resignation?

lisahappymom
by Member on Sep. 5, 2014 at 10:58 AM

Yes, I know, and quitting by text is certainly not something that I would do, but given her interest in teaching in the future, I'm guessing that it was something pretty huge that got in her way.  With that said, I certainly would be hesitant to ever hire her in the future (if she expressed interest in teaching again at your university) unless she gave a *really* good explanation for her actions. 

Quoting Marti123: I do try not to judge in these situations, and my first question was. "Did we not offer her enough support?" but even ashamed and under mental duress, there is no excuse for texting a resignation! It is just so unprofessional in our culture, completely burning a bridge in the world of academia. She hopes to continue teaching, but this will be a huge albatross to her. An so silly, when an email or phone call take similar amount of effort!
Quoting lisahappymom:

Yes, I agree that a text is absolutely not the way to leave a job. Just to play devil's advocate and give her the benefit of the doubt, maybe she had a situation at home with a child, spouse, or parent who is ill and needs her care?  She also might just have felt so bad about having to renege on her decision to work for you at the last minute that she was too ashamed to do it in person or even over the phone.  Either way, I'm so sorry that you have to scramble to find a replacement.  Hope it works out!


Nighttiger
by Ashley on Sep. 5, 2014 at 2:13 PM
Most places I've worked require your resignation in writing so a phone call would do no good other than add an extra step. And say it was something where she had to rush to a hospital or fly out of town unexpectedly. Maybe she didnt have ready access to email? I thinking about this, my first thought was "I have my phone but no email". Then I remebered I actually do have my email hooked up but never use it to send from my phone. Maybe it was her best choice?? Always stinks to have it happen without warning.

Quoting Marti123: I do try not to judge in these situations, and my first question was. "Did we not offer her enough support?" but even ashamed and under mental duress, there is no excuse for texting a resignation! It is just so unprofessional in our culture, completely burning a bridge in the world of academia. She hopes to continue teaching, but this will be a huge albatross to her. An so silly, when an email or phone call take similar amount of effort!

Quoting lisahappymom:

Yes, I agree that a text is absolutely not the way to leave a job. Just to play devil's advocate and give her the benefit of the doubt, maybe she had a situation at home with a child, spouse, or parent who is ill and needs her care?  She also might just have felt so bad about having to renege on her decision to work for you at the last minute that she was too ashamed to do it in person or even over the phone.  Either way, I'm so sorry that you have to scramble to find a replacement.  Hope it works out!

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