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Over Qualified

Posted by on Feb. 4, 2018 at 10:28 AM
  • 8 Replies

So I saw a post on LinkedIn this morning older lady around her 50s complaining that she was having a difficult time getting a job. In most cases, she was told she was overqualified as to why she did not get the job.

Her opinion is she believes they use the overqualified term to discriminate against age.

She also mentioned she feels a lot of employees want 18-year-old workers with 4 plus years of experience which is not realistic.

I do think this is an issue and believe this still happens people not wanting to hire older people. The baby boomers do have a habit of not wanting to adjust to change (my boss is a perfect example at the age of 70). I do not think employers should hold that true for all aging generations. I know my generation grew up with the start of technology and we are perfectly capable of adjusting to change. Also, times have changed people are working later in age.

For some, they question the idea why employers would prefer a young worker over an experienced older one. I myself have to ask this question also as an older more experienced worker is likely to have the tools and skills to do the job effectively and efficiently. Not only that they are likely to stay at the job.

The younger generation tends to move around a lot. This is true I have witnessed this myself. Women not so especially those that are family planning. They tend to stay, but men tend to move to better opportunities as they gain skills and experience.

So what are your thoughts?

by on Feb. 4, 2018 at 10:28 AM
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Replies (1-8):
calsmom62
by Gold Member on Feb. 4, 2018 at 11:33 AM
If my position Im trying to fill is entry level or lower rung, and a candidate has experience more relevant to a much higher position. A large piece of my focus is their answer when queried about how they came to apply for this lesser lower paid position .. I m not going to put in time and money in onboarding if a very short time later they find themselves frustrated with having a position with fewer responsibilities and autonomy than their previous job, or that while any pay was better than no pay when unemployment ran out now they find themselves having to dip into savings to maintain their lifestyle—. they are going to be looking very soon for a new job.. You can usually tell when they are seeking this type of position knowing full well what is entailed vs “I’ll take it to pay the bills till something else comes a long”
ljmom24
by Silver Member on Feb. 4, 2018 at 5:54 PM
Given my current situation this is a big fear of mine. I have 17 years experience at the same company doing relatively the same thing. The thing is there aren’t a lot of companies that do what we did. There are only 32 other companies and only 1 per state and they are all going through similar issues. The role was eliminated. Because it’s a state by state agencie some did other things depending on how they came to be. Finding a new job in my old industry would mean moving which isn’t an option so I need to switch industries and yes skill transfer but it’s still hard.

I found a job that was almost verbatim to my prior position. That I did for over 10 years, that I I could do in my sleep. It’s a very small area of law. Like I had to explain it to an attorney once when interviewing for another job years ago. So I get a quick response “not qualified” um ok but to be honest quick search of company i knew at 43 I was going to be the old lady so I was worried about that. I do think it’s more they didn’t want to pay a lot for the position and my experience does lead to think I expect a different pay level.

I think it’s also a two way street, both sides need to be looking for a good fit but that said age doesn’t say it all. If an employer isn’t open to a more seasoned employee it’s not going to make a good match. If an employer is only looking for short term commitments it might not be what a more mature employee wants either.

Some people can click at any age. One of the outplacement trainings they had a work the lady told the story of her 70 plus yr old dad who works for a millennial start up. They were hesitant but he pointed out his age gives him experience they will need and they can learn but it may slow them and they now love him. It’s all about selling yourself and finding a good fit.
Linda_Runs
by Bronze Member on Feb. 5, 2018 at 10:22 AM

I don't think there is such a thing as overqualified. The only issue in a person whom takes a job that is well beneath their potential is job satisfaction.  We all know that dissatisfied employees may not be the most productive and could lead to more sick time, etc.

hotspice58
by on Feb. 5, 2018 at 10:24 AM

A young  person with no experience is cheaper.   Age comes into it but it boils down to money.

Marti123
by Platinum Member on Feb. 7, 2018 at 12:41 PM
I think this is more of a problem in business, definitely.

In healthcare or though, they hire older adults frequently.
ljmom24
by Silver Member on Feb. 7, 2018 at 1:53 PM
Depends. I have a friend in her 50s who’s a nurse. She’s been working for years in the cardiac icu and she’s been applying for years for jobs with in her hospital system for an office or clinic job. She might have better luck looking at another hospital but she doesn’t want to loose the benefits she’s built up all these years. Thing is she’s too expensive for those other jobs. They don’t want to pay her current rate. She’d take a pay cut but she can’t even get an interview.

Quoting Marti123: I think this is more of a problem in business, definitely.

In healthcare or though, they hire older adults frequently.
Marti123
by Platinum Member on Feb. 7, 2018 at 4:28 PM
I bear you, but this happens with all ages. It's the infamous pay of an office nursing job! Even the young nurses we try to poach away from the bedside, have to take huge paycuts. Office just pays much lower.

Bedside nursing is brutal on your body and psyche, BUT it pays well.

Quoting ljmom24: Depends. I have a friend in her 50s who’s a nurse. She’s been working for years in the cardiac icu and she’s been applying for years for jobs with in her hospital system for an office or clinic job. She might have better luck looking at another hospital but she doesn’t want to loose the benefits she’s built up all these years. Thing is she’s too expensive for those other jobs. They don’t want to pay her current rate. She’d take a pay cut but she can’t even get an interview.

Quoting Marti123: I think this is more of a problem in business, definitely.

In healthcare or though, they hire older adults frequently.
ljmom24
by Silver Member on Feb. 7, 2018 at 6:24 PM
That’s why she was looking for an office or clinic job. She’s on her 2nd hip replacement before 60. The other part was kids were older now and she did weekend nights so she didn’t need child care. Now she was looking for a Monday to Friday, working more days so while her hourly is less her weekly not so much.

Quoting Marti123: I bear you, but this happens with all ages. It's the infamous pay of an office nursing job! Even the young nurses we try to poach away from the bedside, have to take huge paycuts. Office just pays much lower.

Bedside nursing is brutal on your body and psyche, BUT it pays well.

Quoting ljmom24: Depends. I have a friend in her 50s who’s a nurse. She’s been working for years in the cardiac icu and she’s been applying for years for jobs with in her hospital system for an office or clinic job. She might have better luck looking at another hospital but she doesn’t want to loose the benefits she’s built up all these years. Thing is she’s too expensive for those other jobs. They don’t want to pay her current rate. She’d take a pay cut but she can’t even get an interview.

Quoting Marti123: I think this is more of a problem in business, definitely.

In healthcare or though, they hire older adults frequently.
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