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Relinquishment: "Developmental PTSD"?

Posted by on Jul. 30, 2014 at 1:35 PM
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by on Jul. 30, 2014 at 1:35 PM
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2jeffsmom
by Bronze Member on Jul. 31, 2014 at 1:06 AM

I really agree with this sentiment. Alcoholism and attachment issued have burdened my son for a very long time. I think he would fit in the PTSD category. I'll always be there for him, but he has to want to change his internalized patterns of self destruction.

Ms.KitKat
by Bronze Member on Aug. 9, 2014 at 11:30 AM
1 mom liked this

I have seen him before speak on such issues. 

My understanding is that in this field- not adoption but post-adoption- in the field of counseling/psychotherapy- some very skilled therapists are recognizing the adoption trauma as the precursor (the root) to the reason why the family/indiv seeks treatment. Sadly, this is still in its infancy and not nearly enough therapists are skilled or trained to recognize this much less even think to ask the question at intake- are you adopted. 

onethentwins
by Gold Member on Aug. 12, 2014 at 3:06 PM
2 moms liked this

 

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

I have seen him before speak on such issues. 

My understanding is that in this field- not adoption but post-adoption- in the field of counseling/psychotherapy- some very skilled therapists are recognizing the adoption trauma as the precursor (the root) to the reason why the family/indiv seeks treatment. Sadly, this is still in its infancy and not nearly enough therapists are skilled or trained to recognize this much less even think to ask the question at intake- are you adopted. 

 We were just discussing that very issue at our last CUB meeting last Saturday. People going to school to be Therapists are just not taught that it's an issue, despite how many adoptees are in 12 step programs and therapy. Someone was even thinking about starting a new 12 step program, AAA. Alcohol Adoptees Anonymous.

Ms.KitKat
by Bronze Member on Aug. 12, 2014 at 3:27 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting onethentwins:


Quoting Ms.KitKat:

I have seen him before speak on such issues. 

My understanding is that in this field- not adoption but post-adoption- in the field of counseling/psychotherapy- some very skilled therapists are recognizing the adoption trauma as the precursor (the root) to the reason why the family/indiv seeks treatment. Sadly, this is still in its infancy and not nearly enough therapists are skilled or trained to recognize this much less even think to ask the question at intake- are you adopted. 

 We were just discussing that very issue at our last CUB meeting last Saturday. People going to school to be Therapists are just not taught that it's an issue, despite how many adoptees are in 12 step programs and therapy. Someone was even thinking about starting a new 12 step program, AAA. Alcohol Adoptees Anonymous.

It's an excellent idea! Along with NAA: Narcotics Adoptees Anon

Although wouldn't it be far better to try and reach these indiv BEFORE it gets to AA and NA when they feel the need to self medicate. 

You know I am an adoption social worker; so my difficulty is in maintaining contact with the afamilies after finalization. At that point, supervision stops as legally, we can not continue to supervise (around 6-8 months of age). It is typically around age 5-6 years when the first inklings of loss are first evident. Children began to act out in ways that are obvious. Sadly, there are very little post adoption services available; and on top of that, this population is generally pretty resistant to seek out services as a family and generally tend to believe the child is the problem. kwim.

onethentwins
by Gold Member on Aug. 13, 2014 at 12:58 PM
1 mom liked this

 

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

Quoting onethentwins:

 

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

I have seen him before speak on such issues. 

My understanding is that in this field- not adoption but post-adoption- in the field of counseling/psychotherapy- some very skilled therapists are recognizing the adoption trauma as the precursor (the root) to the reason why the family/indiv seeks treatment. Sadly, this is still in its infancy and not nearly enough therapists are skilled or trained to recognize this much less even think to ask the question at intake- are you adopted. 

 We were just discussing that very issue at our last CUB meeting last Saturday. People going to school to be Therapists are just not taught that it's an issue, despite how many adoptees are in 12 step programs and therapy. Someone was even thinking about starting a new 12 step program, AAA. Alcohol Adoptees Anonymous.

It's an excellent idea! Along with NAA: Narcotics Adoptees Anon

Although wouldn't it be far better to try and reach these indiv BEFORE it gets to AA and NA when they feel the need to self medicate. 

You know I am an adoption social worker; so my difficulty is in maintaining contact with the afamilies after finalization. At that point, supervision stops as legally, we can not continue to supervise (around 6-8 months of age). It is typically around age 5-6 years when the first inklings of loss are first evident. Children began to act out in ways that are obvious. Sadly, there are very little post adoption services available; and on top of that, this population is generally pretty resistant to seek out services as a family and generally tend to believe the child is the problem. kwim.

 I do know what you mean.  There are Adoptive parents are willing to acknowledge that their adoptee children are going to need to be parented differently and make concessions, but there are some who adamantly refuse to believe it and even those that try to produce stats that state Adopted children do better than children raised in their birth families.

DVT
by Bronze Member on Aug. 13, 2014 at 7:45 PM


Quoting Ms.KitKat:

Quoting onethentwins:


Quoting Ms.KitKat:

I have seen him before speak on such issues. 

My understanding is that in this field- not adoption but post-adoption- in the field of counseling/psychotherapy- some very skilled therapists are recognizing the adoption trauma as the precursor (the root) to the reason why the family/indiv seeks treatment. Sadly, this is still in its infancy and not nearly enough therapists are skilled or trained to recognize this much less even think to ask the question at intake- are you adopted. 

 We were just discussing that very issue at our last CUB meeting last Saturday. People going to school to be Therapists are just not taught that it's an issue, despite how many adoptees are in 12 step programs and therapy. Someone was even thinking about starting a new 12 step program, AAA. Alcohol Adoptees Anonymous.

It's an excellent idea! Along with NAA: Narcotics Adoptees Anon

Although wouldn't it be far better to try and reach these indiv BEFORE it gets to AA and NA when they feel the need to self medicate. 

You know I am an adoption social worker; so my difficulty is in maintaining contact with the afamilies after finalization. At that point, supervision stops as legally, we can not continue to supervise (around 6-8 months of age). It is typically around age 5-6 years when the first inklings of loss are first evident. Children began to act out in ways that are obvious. Sadly, there are very little post adoption services available; and on top of that, this population is generally pretty resistant to seek out services as a family and generally tend to believe the child is the problem. kwim.

The same thing happened to me even though it was about 20 years ago - no contact after the age of 5 & 6 of my children.  Then the agency even told me that there was no guarantee that they would get any stuff I sent after that.  So I sent one pic of my youngest son when he was 2 and that was it.  I was lucky they found me off of that pic - I had my name (married) on it and the agency use white out but the amom scratch it off and then I was found the old fashion way - through a phone book.  It's sad to find out after the fact about the post  adoption problems that weren't even acknowledge when the adoption took place.

adopteeme
by Bronze Member on Aug. 14, 2014 at 6:40 AM
It IS bad that adoption practices haven't evolved much at all since those dinosaur days.
Know how many times I've heard "That doesn't happen anymore in adoption" pfft.
Yeah- it does.

DVT- I did something a little similar with a picture I was allowed to include in my non-identifying letter to my mom through the C.I. I staged a pic of me and my family at a picnic where the Chesapeake Bay Bridge was in the background. We were eating MD blue crabs. As custom the table was covered with newspaper- The Washington Post. And the crabs were served from a empty cardboard beer box - Natty Boh. It was clearly marked Baltimore.
It was the best I could think of since the C.I. refused to give her MY identifying info in a one sided exchange.
I did write my name/address in lemon juice on the inside flap of the envelope. LOL.
Remember invisible ink trick as a kid? Figured it couldn't hurt.

Fudge those people that cross their arms and stomp that there's nothing wrong with adoption just the way it was - and is!




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