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ARE U PROUD OR ASHAMED OF YOUR HERITAGE?

Posted by on Mar. 4, 2007 at 8:42 PM
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I HAD POSTED THIS IN A JOURNAL ENTRY AND I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE INTERESTING TO POST IT IN THIS GROUP :) CHEERS!

"As you age naturally, your family shows more and more on your face. If you deny that, you deny your heritage."
-Frances Conroy

ARE YOU PROUD OR ASHAMED OF YOUR CULTURE AND HERITAGE?

WHAT NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE ISSUES OR SITUATIONS HAVE YOU COME ACROSS?


I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN PROUD OF MY KOREAN HERITAGE. I LOVE TO HEAR STORIES FROM MY GRANDPARENTS GROWING UP IN KOREA DURING WAR TIMES ETC... I LOVE ASIAN HISTORY AND FOLKLORE. I THOUGHT IT WAS REALLY COOL TO BE DIFFERENT FROM MY MATES AT SCHOOL. I WENT TO A SCHOOL WERE IT WAS PREDOMINATELY CAUCASIAN AND I HAD MY SHARE OF NAME CALLING AND THERE WAS AN A SPLIT SECOND, "I WISH I WASN'T KOREAN" MOMENT ....BUT FOR THE MOST PART MY FRIENDS THOUGHT MY CULTURE WAS COOL. THEY ENJOYED GOING TO OUR KOREAN FAMILY PARTIES AND THEY ESPECIALLY LOVED THE KOREAN FOOD. I ALWAYS PREFERRED IT WHEN MY MOM WOULD PACK ME RICE AND KOREAN BBQ OR MANDOO(KOREAN DUMPLINGS) THEN A TURKEY SANDWICH AND CHIPS :)


HOWEVER, I HAVE HAD FRIENDS WHERE REALLY ASHAMED OF BEING KOREAN AND WOULD GO OUT OF THEIR WAY TO AVOID IT OR I HAD KOREAN MATES THAT WOULDN'T HAVE ANYTHING TO DO WITH ANYONE BUT KOREANS.


I GUESS I HAVE TO CREDIT MY FAMILY FOR ALWAYS ENCOURAGING ME TO BE PROUD OF MY HERITAGE BY TAKING ME TO FAMILY CULTURAL EVENTS,ASIAN ART EXHIBITS, MAINTAINING TRADITIONAL VALUES, SENDING ME TO KOREAN SCHOOL CAMP ETC... 
 THEY TAUGHT US TO BE PROUD OF OUR HERITAGE AND TO APPRECIATE THE BENEFITS OF BEING BORN IN THE US.


WHAT ABOUT YOU? WHAT ARE YOUR VIEWS AND EXPERIENCES.


 

CHEERS!

by on Mar. 4, 2007 at 8:42 PM
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Replies (1-7):
cassandra17
by on Mar. 4, 2007 at 9:26 PM
I commented on your journal. The answer is the same.Tongue out

~Cassandra
christinaliu
by on Mar. 5, 2007 at 11:30 PM
I think this is a great question, but not necessarily an easy one to answer.

My answer today is that I'm very proud of my heritage.  But there was a journey I had to take to get to where I am today.  For a very long time I wasn't comfortable in my own skin.  But now I am very proud of who I am and where I come from.  I only wish that I had paid more attention when my Mom was trying to teach me Chinese at home.  I also wish that my parents had taught me more when I was younger and living with them. 

I hope that I am able to impart a pride in their heritage to my girls.  And I hope that they will be proud of who they are, and especially all the parts that make up who they are!  The good thing is that there are many more kids that are biracial or multiracial around, so one hopes that they won't feel singled out as being "different."  And even if they are considered different, I would hope that they would take pride in their differences, rather than be ashamed of them.  But that is a path that they must walk eventually; I just hope that their journey is an easier one than the one I took! 

--Christina

KatCh
by on Mar. 6, 2007 at 8:05 AM

You know, I have to be honest and say I've accepted being Chinese, but it's what I am and that's pretty much it. I think I still have unresolved cultural  conflicts that started in high school. I've never really felt comfortable in my own skin, and I think a lot of it has to do with where I live. I've noticed that the Asians here tend to stay within their own communities and resist being westernized,  while the ones on the west coast tend to be professionals. Still,  my kids seem to be okay with who they are, and their friends seem to be okay with who they are, and my friends seem to be okay with who I am, so I can live with whatever issues I have.

tami06
by Member on Mar. 7, 2007 at 11:12 AM
I'm full Japanese-American. I'm very proud of being different from everyone else. I don't look like everyone else (blonde hair, blue eyes) at my kids' school.
I try to teach my 4 kids of their hertiage and traditions that were passed onto me. I want my kids to be proud of being 1/2 Japanese-American, too. 
My parents, grandparents, aunts & uncles were placed in the interment camps during WWII, after they were released....they had shame and prejudism of being Japanese-American. They didn't want us to sound differently than the average Joe. So, unfortunately didn't speak Japanese to us kids at all. It is unfortunate. But, no hard feelings at all. I love being American with having an Asian twist!
asian_mama
by on Mar. 26, 2007 at 11:00 PM
I am Filipino and proud of it.  Though in 2004 I became a US Citizen, but I am still proud of my heritage... I am still Filipino at heart.
christinaliu
by on Mar. 28, 2007 at 8:29 AM

Quoting asian_mama:

I am Filipino and proud of it. Though in 2004 I became a US Citizen, but I am still proud of my heritage... I am still Filipino at heart.
I think asian_mama makes a great point.  Your country of citizenship and your culture can be separate and it's definitely possible to be proud of your ethnicity and your citizenship! 
starrynite
by on Mar. 28, 2007 at 2:11 PM
I am proud of the history of China (my good friend in town - she's Japanese-American - and I like to joke that the Chinese invented everything but the Japanese improved on them all).   ;)

I was never ashamed of being Chinese growing up, although I was ashamed of some of the louder ones because I thought they made the rest of us seem loud and rude.   Like Christina, I wish I had learned more from my parents when I was young and living at home.  But, youth makes you kind of stupid sometimes...I used to roll my eyes and daydream when my dad started telling us Chinese stuff (like teachings from Lao-tzu or Confucious).

I recall kids who really were ashamed...they'd dye their hair blond and pretend like they weren't Asian.  It was sad because even with blond hair, without plastic surgery, our facial features are still fully Asian, and they ended up not being fully accepted by either the White or the Asian community.
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