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How Much Indian Am I??

Posted by on Apr. 21, 2012 at 10:40 PM
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 Here is a dumb question. Sorry :) Can any of you tell me how much indian I have in me? My great great grandmother was Cherokee indian and my greatgrandmother on my fathers side was dutch.

by on Apr. 21, 2012 at 10:40 PM
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cherrynarissa
by Member on Apr. 22, 2012 at 2:32 PM

this great great grandmother was she full cherokee?  if so that would make you a 16th cherokee =to 61/4th percent.  this is if you have no other indian ancestors besides her if you have others then the percentage goes up.

Zacknalexmom
by on May. 5, 2012 at 10:23 AM

 

Quoting cherrynarissa:

this great great grandmother was she full cherokee?  if so that would make you a 16th cherokee =to 61/4th percent.  this is if you have no other indian ancestors besides her if you have others then the percentage goes up.

 Update- My greatgreat granmother was 1/2 cherokee

              My greatgreatgreat grandmother was full cherokee

              My greatgreatgreatgreat grandmother and grandfather were both full cherokee indians.

               So here is the question- How much indian does that make me if any?  And will I be elgible to become a roll member or in a tribe or clan? I doubt my family ever signed the roll due to the trail of tears even though some of them survived and my aunt and uncles came of missing,possibly sent on the trail of tears. If they weren't on the roll then I guess asking to see if I am elgible for  roll or anything else may seem selfish of me.

cherrynarissa
by Member on May. 5, 2012 at 1:52 PM
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if they were on the trail of tears then they would have been enrolled.  this is how the us government was able to round up the cherokees.

yes you would qualify for enrollment if you can get documentation.  for the eastern cherokee band you have to be on 16th (6 1/4% )at least.  for the oklahoma I am pretty sure their is not blood percentage/ amount requirement alabama's tribal laws

 

so you would be exactly 48 3/4 precent cherokee

it is never selfish to wish to optain info about your heritage / roots as your hertiage is a part of who you are has a person to wish to learn more is in fact honoring the ones that came before you as they live on through in the hearts of their decendents.

LucyHarper
by New Member on Jul. 14, 2012 at 10:24 PM

You're a 16th Cherokee, whether or not you are eligible to become an actual member depends on the blood quantum rules of the Cherokee. For example, there are some tribes where if you are even a tiny bit Native American, you can be accepted into the tribe, but others are much more strict. For example, my friend is 100% Onondaga, his wife is white, the rules of blood quantum for his tribe state that you must be at least 50%, and it must come from the mothers side, so even though his daughter is 50% Onondaga, she is not accepted into the tribe. Do you know what tribe she was from? Because it varies within the Cherokee nation, if she was in the Eastern band of Chrokees, the blood quantum rule is 1/16th, so you would apply as long as she was enrolled in the census, but if she was in the United Keetoowah band of Cherokee, you would need to be 1/4 Cherokee, so you would not be able to join.

Zacknalexmom
by on Jul. 16, 2012 at 5:49 PM

 

Quoting LucyHarper:

You're a 16th Cherokee, whether or not you are eligible to become an actual member depends on the blood quantum rules of the Cherokee. For example, there are some tribes where if you are even a tiny bit Native American, you can be accepted into the tribe, but others are much more strict. For example, my friend is 100% Onondaga, his wife is white, the rules of blood quantum for his tribe state that you must be at least 50%, and it must come from the mothers side, so even though his daughter is 50% Onondaga, she is not accepted into the tribe. Do you know what tribe she was from? Because it varies within the Cherokee nation, if she was in the Eastern band of Chrokees, the blood quantum rule is 1/16th, so you would apply as long as she was enrolled in the census, but if she was in the United Keetoowah band of Cherokee, you would need to be 1/4 Cherokee, so you would not be able to join.

 Thanks Lucy :) I'm proud of my Cherokee heritage but I feel like I have somewhat let my Cherokee family down. Since being only 16th indian that's  not much at all. I can't or don't know what to say since I'm more white then indian. My x3 grandmother married a white man and that's what broke our cherokee heritage. Should I be upset about this? or should I let it go? It just breaks my heart. I love my x3 grandmother but why did she have to break the chain? I'm sorry if I sound selfish. Not trying to be selfish. How do I deal with this?

LucyHarper
by New Member on Jul. 16, 2012 at 6:07 PM
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Quoting Zacknalexmom:

 

Quoting LucyHarper:

You're a 16th Cherokee, whether or not you are eligible to become an actual member depends on the blood quantum rules of the Cherokee. For example, there are some tribes where if you are even a tiny bit Native American, you can be accepted into the tribe, but others are much more strict. For example, my friend is 100% Onondaga, his wife is white, the rules of blood quantum for his tribe state that you must be at least 50%, and it must come from the mothers side, so even though his daughter is 50% Onondaga, she is not accepted into the tribe. Do you know what tribe she was from? Because it varies within the Cherokee nation, if she was in the Eastern band of Chrokees, the blood quantum rule is 1/16th, so you would apply as long as she was enrolled in the census, but if she was in the United Keetoowah band of Cherokee, you would need to be 1/4 Cherokee, so you would not be able to join.

 Thanks Lucy :) I'm proud of my Cherokee heritage but I feel like I have somewhat let my Cherokee family down. Since being only 16th indian that's  not much at all. I can't or don't know what to say since I'm more white then indian. My x3 grandmother married a white man and that's what broke our cherokee heritage. Should I be upset about this? or should I let it go? It just breaks my heart. I love my x3 grandmother but why did she have to break the chain? I'm sorry if I sound selfish. Not trying to be selfish. How do I deal with this?

Why did she have to break the chain? Because she fell in love. She shouldn't not marry someone because they are white, you shouldn't be upset with her. I'm white, my husband is 50% Native American, some can say that his grandparents broke the chain, we dont see it like that. I don't know how it is everywhere, but in his culture, being Native American isn't about your DNA, its your culture, outside of legality for blood quantum, they don't see someone as 20% Native American or 75% Native American, its like saying your 75% Jewish, you either are or your not, its about your culture. Our son has blond hair and blue eyes, he is still raised in the Native American traditions and culture and is Native American. Looking at him, you'd think my husband was white as he takes more after the french side of his family, but he isn't, he was raised on a reservation in the traditional Native American culture, he is fluent in his language and will pass it on to our children. So no, you may not be Native American, doesn't mean you can't learn about your culture and connect with any distant Native American relatives. Don't feel like you can't talk to them, race is not everything, Native Americans can talk about anything white people can talk about, and you can ask questions about your culture. Your grandmother didn't break your heritage, the Native American culture could have been passed down if it were meant to be.

amy.eluria
by New Member on Jul. 17, 2012 at 9:17 PM
Tribes set their own limits of what percent you need to enroll as a member. In my tribe it half... I think you will have a hard time finding any tribe that would take a 1/16. But I'm wondering why you want to enroll? If you never met the relative that had natives blood lines then why so interested?
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