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WHY????? HELP

Posted by on Sep. 2, 2008 at 10:58 PM
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Why can I not get REAL good Bokeh with my camera?

  I have tried everything and NOTHING works.

  I have tested my lens to see if it does make good bokeh and it should, but I still can't get the fuzzy circles?

  HELP!

by on Sep. 2, 2008 at 10:58 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Kelli_and_Riley
by Member on Sep. 2, 2008 at 11:02 PM

What's your camera?  Your lens?  Your settings?  =)

libbykate
by Member on Sep. 3, 2008 at 5:06 PM

I have a Nikon D50 with the kit lens.

  And I have tried a many settings.

MasonsMommy1707
by Group Owner on Sep. 3, 2008 at 9:16 PM

To get a great bokeh shot you must lower your fstop to it's lowest setting.  For example, my kit lens is the 18-55mm and I think it's lowest fstop is
f3.5. 

With my 50mm it's 1.8 which makes for amazing bokeh shots!  Such a great lens to use for bokeh :)

Make sure that what you are photographing is closer to your lens then the part of your shot that you want to be bokeh.  Your fstop is all about depth of field, the lower your fstop the smaller depth of field, the higher your fstop the larger your depth of field.

The smaller depth of field is what creates the desirable bokeh!

Here is your wikipedia definition to help:

Depth of field

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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In optics, particularly as it relates to film and photography, the depth of field (DOF) is the portion of a scene that appears sharp in the image. Although a lens can precisely focus at only one distance, the decrease in sharpness is gradual on either side of the focused distance, so that within the DOF, the unsharpness is imperceptible under normal viewing conditions.

For some images, such as landscapes, a large DOF may be appropriate, while for others, such as portraits, a small DOF may be more effective.

The DOF is determined by the subject distance (that is, the distance to the plane that is perfectly in focus), the lens focal length, and the lens f-number (relative aperture). Except at close-up distances, DOF is approximately determined by the subject magnification and the lens f-number. For a given f-number, increasing the magnification, either by moving closer to the subject or using a lens of greater focal length, decreases the DOF; decreasing magnification increases DOF. For a given subject magnification, increasing the f-number (decreasing the aperture diameter) increases the DOF; decreasing f-number decreases DOF.

When focus is set to the hyperfocal distance, the DOF extends from half the hyperfocal distance to infinity, and is the largest DOF possible for a given f-number.

The advent of digital technology in photography has provided additional means of controlling the extent of image sharpness; some methods allow DOF that would be impossible with traditional techniques, and some allow the DOF to be determined after the image is made.

A macro photograph with very shallow depth of field.
A macro photograph with very shallow depth of field.
Effect of aperture on blur and DOF. The points in focus (2) project points onto the image plane (5), but points at different distances (1 and 3) project blurred images, or circles of confusion. Decreasing the aperture size (4) reduces the size of the blur circles for points not in the focused plane, so that the blurring is imperceptible, and all points are within the DOF.
Effect of aperture on blur and DOF. The points in focus (2) project points onto the image plane (5), but points at different distances (1 and 3) project blurred images, or circles of confusion. Decreasing the aperture size (4) reduces the size of the blur circles for points not in the focused plane, so that the blurring is imperceptible, and all points are within the DOF.

 

memory.lane.snippets.. Get yours at bighugelabs.com/flickr
Kelli_and_Riley
by Member on Sep. 3, 2008 at 9:45 PM

Jami covered that pretty thoroughly. ;) It's all about the f-stop when it comes to bokeh. I'm not familiar with Nikon, but I'm assuming they have an AV setting...? Try using that and setting your f-stop to the lowest possible setting.

libbykate
by Member on Sep. 3, 2008 at 10:45 PM

 

Quoting Kelli_and_Riley:

Jami covered that pretty thoroughly. ;) It's all about the f-stop when it comes to bokeh. I'm not familiar with Nikon, but I'm assuming they have an AV setting...? Try using that and setting your f-stop to the lowest possible setting.

I have tried the lowest F-stop, in every setting ( the ones that made sense) and I know how to focus. I have some photos with good bokeh, but none of them where meant to be that way, when I try to do it I can't and I can ONLY do it with really upclose shots. I mean I can't even get good blurring in the background with a portriat like shot.

    Oh and my lowest F-stop is 3.5 as well. I think I can go lower but sometimes it won't let me. I don't get it, I will have to double check to be sure. But 3.5 is pretty much it.

   There has got to be something I am missing. I have read other tutorials and done them, like I said I checked my camera to see if I can even get good bokeh with the lens and I should be able to. ????

  I think my absolute lowest is 2.8, but I have to double check.

MasonsMommy1707
by Group Owner on Sep. 4, 2008 at 10:41 PM

Wow, you're awesome!  You spelt my name right, nobody spells my name right, not even my own mother...


lol ok ok, I was kidding about that last part, but the rest is true!  haha :)

Quoting Kelli_and_Riley:

Jami covered that pretty thoroughly. ;) It's all about the f-stop when it comes to bokeh. I'm not familiar with Nikon, but I'm assuming they have an AV setting...? Try using that and setting your f-stop to the lowest possible setting.


memory.lane.snippets.. Get yours at bighugelabs.com/flickr
MasonsMommy1707
by Group Owner on Sep. 5, 2008 at 8:23 AM

Could you please take a picture for us and post your settings?  Then maybe I'll be able to help you more! :)

memory.lane.snippets.. Get yours at bighugelabs.com/flickr
libbykate
by Member on Sep. 5, 2008 at 9:55 PM


Quoting MasonsMommy1707:

Could you please take a picture for us and post your settings?  Then maybe I'll be able to help you more! :)


Yes, I will do that, thanks so much.

libbykate
by Member on Sep. 7, 2008 at 4:49 PM

OK, so I used the A setting instead of manual, which I normally do ( but I had tried everything for this)

  I used the highes f-stop and the lowest f-stop, I was getting better blurs but still not actual bokeh. I will post the photos later tonight when I have time.

Kelli_and_Riley
by Member on Sep. 8, 2008 at 12:46 AM

I try to take notice of how people spell their names because as "Kelli with an i"  my name is misspelled more often than not.  =)

Quoting MasonsMommy1707:

Wow, you're awesome! You spelt my name right, nobody spells my name right, not even my own mother...


lol ok ok, I was kidding about that last part, but the rest is true! haha :)

Quoting Kelli_and_Riley:

Jami covered that pretty thoroughly. ;) It's all about the f-stop when it comes to bokeh. I'm not familiar with Nikon, but I'm assuming they have an AV setting...? Try using that and setting your f-stop to the lowest possible setting.



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