Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Can I get an example of a unit study???

Posted by on Nov. 11, 2009 at 7:47 PM
  • 10 Replies
  • 803 Total Views

Can someone explain to me what a typical unit would look like? What I am thinking of is every subject would have something to do with the unit. Like if your unit was the World War II , you would do:

                                      Science: Making a powder toy gun

                                      Reading: Reading the book about WWII in that children's chapter book series( Tree house or something) and other cool books on WWII

                                       Math: Learning Manipulation with army men

                                       Spelling: simple spelling words that deal with WWII

                                       English: Writing a "as if I was there" story on WWII

                                       Social Studies: Making a model of WWII

                                                                                                                 ect...

                                                         Is it something like that? Thanks

                                                                                                 Janine

                               

by on Nov. 11, 2009 at 7:47 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
mom2queenie2004
by Cheryl on Nov. 11, 2009 at 9:48 PM
1 mom liked this

That is what it is. This is what I found.


What is a unit study?


It is defined as an in-depth study of a topic (space, trees, cars, etc.) that takes into account many areas of the topic, such as geography, science, history, art, etc. It is a complete immersion into the topic so that the student will see things as a "whole" instead of bits and pieces learned throughout their education.

Instead of learning about whales in the third grade, the oceans in the fourth grade, explorers in the fifth grade, and sea life in the sixth grade, for example, the student learns about all of these during a unit study of the ocean. He/She is exposed to the geography, spelling and vocabulary, and plant and animal life of the ocean. In learning these things, the student will develop and sharpen skills like reading, writing, researching, and so on. In the educational field, a unit study is often times referred to as "cross-curriculum", or crossing over many lines of curriculum (science, geography, history, etc.

                    


 


 

MyVavies
by Welcome Squad on Nov. 11, 2009 at 10:11 PM

Then why do the public and privet schools teach the other way? What is their reasoning? And for the homeschoolers, what keeps the child from getting overwhelmed with to much information to learned and remember?Thanks for your answer.

Janine

mom2queenie2004
by Cheryl on Nov. 12, 2009 at 1:13 PM

As for PS...I think it might be to hard to keep 25 students interested in one thing for so long. Also, they are under the belief that one teacher should teach one thing and the other teacher should teach something else. The math teacher teaches math, but has no idea what the science teacher is teaching in their class. It would take a major overhaul of the system, which it needs anyway.Unit studies are used for preschool and kindergarten in PS a lot. Then kids get into grade school and start to switch teachers.

One thing I like about unit studies is being able to concentrate on what my kids are into at the moment. It is easy to do with 2 kids, not so much with a large class room. 

PS school students do not remember all they are taught. Most of them learn it long enough for the test and then forget most of it after that. I really find it hard that actual learning occurs. Short term memorization is what occurs. Home schoolers that get overwhelmed can easily take it sower, adjust the curriculum or learn it a different way. My DD, 5, finally came across a spelling unit that she had trouble with. It took her 3 weeks to finally get the words correct. In PS they would have moved on before she was ready and that can cause problems. We were able to take the time to work with her until she was ready. 

                    


 


 

Aldea
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 8:13 PM

We are currently studying Lewis and Clark Exploration. 

Language Arts - journaling, reading and writing reports

Arithmetic - totaling the lbs of meat they hunted or whatever,  provisions needed, lbs of provisions carrying, etc.

History/Geography - we are currently making a topographical map

Science - The animals and plants they noted in the journal they kept.  Those also for medicinal.

I do unit studies with my children  ages 10, 12, 15, and 17.  I write the unit studies and will also use KONOS and Five In A Row.



ziff130
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:55 PM

My kids are 2 & 4 so our unit studies are a bit simple but this week the topic is "B".

Intro to the letter: They followed cut outs of "Bobby Bear" tracks to a big bowl of items that start w/ B. Then we realized it was Bobby Bear's birthday and had a Birthday Bash! We made a birthday cake and put blue icing on it.

Literature: We had a day on the 3 Bears. We read several different stories... we wrote a story about if the 3 Bears found Goldilocks's home instead.

Phonics: We made a book w/ different words that start w/ B and then my ds illustrated the words and wrote them. We played a B game. I made a board game and printed out pictures. The ones that start w/ a B you get to move one space and if you get the picture of "Bobby Bear" then you get to move 2.

Math: We used teddy grahams to work on math --- counting and simple math. On our 3 Bears day we made porridge and worked on small, medium and large and putting things in order of size. We used buttons and worked on estimation, sorting and patterns. We're going to do a bean graphing activity. We'll survey people and find out which type of bean is the favorite.

Science: We're going to have a day of Bears. We'll spend the whole day learning about Bears. We'll talk about bone and what they do. We'll write and illustrate a Bear fact book.

Crafts: On our 3 Bears day we made finger puppets of the 3 Bears and the house out of a paper bag. We're going to make balloon prints.

Fun: We had BeanBag fun. ;)We had different contests w/ beanbags (I filled some socks w/ beans and tied a knot in the top).

There's an example of one of our weeks... okay.... 2 weeks. We only do 3 days a week though b/c my kids are only preschool age. HTH!

MyVavies
by Welcome Squad on Aug. 29, 2010 at 10:40 PM

Can Lap-books and united studies be a unhomeschool thing?

mom2queenie2004
by Cheryl on Aug. 29, 2010 at 11:19 PM

 I think so. If the child is the one who wants to learn about it this is just one way to have them learn.

shoeshoegirl12
by Welcome Squad on Nov. 30, 2012 at 8:58 PM

Where did you get the math problems for the pounds of meat they hunted and other weighing stuff. Like what web site did you use ...or did you make it  up on the top of your head? Also, what if they already knew how to measure. What if they were working on light Algebra or something higher? Where would you get all those problems for them to work on and still keep it in theme?

I feel like I can make up or use odd books for things to do in subjects like Science or asking questions about geography for them to learn. But it's math and grammar that I (and my guess everyone) would need some kind of guidance.

I mean look at grammar ,for example, used in a Unit themed study. We as teachers can teach the grammar to our children using our creativity, adding examples of how a certain punctuation is used in a fun, themed sentence. But what about when it comes to practice time? How are we going to come up with ALL THOSE  practice sentence for them to proofread and add the marks to but still in the theme? Just making up one worksheet would take hours. And they would wiz right thought them needing more.

Unless there are websites for themed unite studies in at lest Math and grammar, I don't know how I am going to manage it in Elementary school level let alone Highschool level!

Quoting Aldea:

We are currently studying Lewis and Clark Exploration. 

Language Arts - journaling, reading and writing reports

Arithmetic - totaling the lbs of meat they hunted or whatever,  provisions needed, lbs of provisions carrying, etc.

History/Geography - we are currently making a topographical map

Science - The animals and plants they noted in the journal they kept.  Those also for medicinal.

I do unit studies with my children  ages 10, 12, 15, and 17.  I write the unit studies and will also use KONOS and Five In A Row.




maggiemom2000
by Helping Hands on Nov. 30, 2012 at 9:07 PM


Quoting shoeshoegirl12:

Where did you get the math problems for the pounds of meat they hunted and other weighing stuff. Like what web site did you use ...or did you make it  up on the top of your head? Also, what if they already knew how to measure. What if they were working on light Algebra or something higher? Where would you get all those problems for them to work on and still keep it in theme?

I feel like I can make up or use odd books for things to do in subjects like Science or asking questions about geography for them to learn. But it's math and grammar that I (and my guess everyone) would need some kind of guidance.

I mean look at grammar ,for example, used in a Unit themed study. We as teachers can teach the grammar to our children using our creativity, adding examples of how a certain punctuation is used in a fun, themed sentence. But what about when it comes to practice time? How are we going to come up with ALL THOSE  practice sentence for them to proofread and add the marks to but still in the theme? Just making up one worksheet would take hours. And they would wiz right thought them needing more.

Unless there are websites for themed unite studies in at lest Math and grammar, I don't know how I am going to manage it in Elementary school level let alone Highschool level!

Quoting Aldea:

We are currently studying Lewis and Clark Exploration. 

Language Arts - journaling, reading and writing reports

Arithmetic - totaling the lbs of meat they hunted or whatever,  provisions needed, lbs of provisions carrying, etc.

History/Geography - we are currently making a topographical map

Science - The animals and plants they noted in the journal they kept.  Those also for medicinal.

I do unit studies with my children  ages 10, 12, 15, and 17.  I write the unit studies and will also use KONOS and Five In A Row.




Have you checked out the unit studies here? http://www.homeschoolshare.com/levels.php

shoeshoegirl12
by Welcome Squad on Nov. 30, 2012 at 9:41 PM
1 mom liked this

 I checked out that sight. It only goes to 4th grade ish....What about the higher grade level ones?

Also, they don't have math or grammar problems for them to practice with that is still themed. I am starting to think the only themed part of math and grammar is going to be when I teach it. I doubt there are problems for the children to work on and study ,outside teaching time, that are going to be themed. Like for example: a worksheet of pilgrims and Indians Allegra questions.

Oh well.. I guess maybe in a few years someone will spend all that time making up EVERY KIND of math level and grammar level practice problems themed.

Quoting maggiemom2000:


Quoting shoeshoegirl12:

Where did you get the math problems for the pounds of meat they hunted and other weighing stuff. Like what web site did you use ...or did you make it  up on the top of your head? Also, what if they already knew how to measure. What if they were working on light Algebra or something higher? Where would you get all those problems for them to work on and still keep it in theme?

I feel like I can make up or use odd books for things to do in subjects like Science or asking questions about geography for them to learn. But it's math and grammar that I (and my guess everyone) would need some kind of guidance.

I mean look at grammar ,for example, used in a Unit themed study. We as teachers can teach the grammar to our children using our creativity, adding examples of how a certain punctuation is used in a fun, themed sentence. But what about when it comes to practice time? How are we going to come up with ALL THOSE  practice sentence for them to proofread and add the marks to but still in the theme? Just making up one worksheet would take hours. And they would wiz right thought them needing more.

Unless there are websites for themed unite studies in at lest Math and grammar, I don't know how I am going to manage it in Elementary school level let alone Highschool level!

Quoting Aldea:

We are currently studying Lewis and Clark Exploration. 

Language Arts - journaling, reading and writing reports

Arithmetic - totaling the lbs of meat they hunted or whatever,  provisions needed, lbs of provisions carrying, etc.

History/Geography - we are currently making a topographical map

Science - The animals and plants they noted in the journal they kept.  Those also for medicinal.

I do unit studies with my children  ages 10, 12, 15, and 17.  I write the unit studies and will also use KONOS and Five In A Row.




Have you checked out the unit studies here? http://www.homeschoolshare.com/levels.php


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)