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Is unit theme studies even possible when you get into higher grade levels?

Posted by on Nov. 30, 2012 at 6:43 PM
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When I told my good friend Sherry about homeschool my preschool daughter, she thought it was a good idea to do the same with her Sophomore son in highschool. He was always picked on because he was so smart (they are all genius). 

Then when I told her I was going to try to do unit studies with my daughter in a unschool fashion, she asked me if a highschooler could do the same? I didn't know what to say to her. I KNOW all through the elementary levels you can. I mean, the hardest they really get into in math is fractions or division.You can do any theme worksheets or word problems with that. However, he is in highschool Trigonometry. How are you suppose to teach him that through the theme of Paleontology or Astronomy. I know you can do it, but I doubt there are math curriculum out there for that. If Sherry knew how Astronomers or Paleontologist use such high math in their field, I KNOW FOR A FACT she could teach it. 

I am glad my friend brought this to my attention. I never thought about what I was going to do after gradeschool when things get a bit more intense and are harder to find stuff  on the Internet to help them learn things like math. We both are more unschooling type, so one year he could be into Paleontology or whatever and the next the Renaissance Ages. So, eventual we would be exploring Math, Reading, EVERY SUBJECT in each theme, at any grade, at some point of time. Where could we find out this information? Is it even possible to teach it through a theme when it comes time for such a high level of education? Thanks.

by on Nov. 30, 2012 at 6:43 PM
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HistoryMamaX3
by Welcome Squad on Nov. 30, 2012 at 7:31 PM
I know they have them, but what makes a unit study so awesome for younger kids (in my opinion) is that offer such a basic idea that can be built upon as needed. As the kids get older the subjects become more in depth, so it loses some of its appeal as the kids NEED more and you tend to have to pick a focus. You'll get a basic idea, but your friend will need to know that she can't rely fully on the unit as a whole lesson but rather as a guide to build upon that meets the child's individual levels.

My two-cents, at least. I have some high school leveled unit studies at home, not there right now, if someone else doesn't guide you in the right direction by the time I make it home, I'll post the publisher later. :-)
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shoeshoegirl12
by Welcome Squad on Nov. 30, 2012 at 11:51 PM

Thank you ... I hope you don't forget. 

I ,  would love to study too what the professionals do and how they apply all those years of doing math to real life. When it comes time, I don't want my kids to think math is useless  after they learned the basics (adding, subtracting, etc..) like I, and everyone else,  did. 

Quoting HistoryMamaX3:

I know they have them, but what makes a unit study so awesome for younger kids (in my opinion) is that offer such a basic idea that can be built upon as needed. As the kids get older the subjects become more in depth, so it loses some of its appeal as the kids NEED more and you tend to have to pick a focus. You'll get a basic idea, but your friend will need to know that she can't rely fully on the unit as a whole lesson but rather as a guide to build upon that meets the child's individual levels.

My two-cents, at least. I have some high school leveled unit studies at home, not there right now, if someone else doesn't guide you in the right direction by the time I make it home, I'll post the publisher later. :-)


HistoryMamaX3
by Welcome Squad on Dec. 1, 2012 at 12:09 AM

The Unit Studies I have are called, Thematic Units by Teacher Created Materials. They have one for every subject imaginable and are broken up into the following 'levels': Early Childhood, Primary, Intermediate, and Challenging. They have all been updated to include Technology extensions and work across the curriculum.

I taught social studies, so I have about 40 of them for various topics- I have used primary ones for older kids and just manipulated the assignment to fit my student's needs and I use the older levels with my kids (ages 5, 7, and 9) and do the same in reverse.

The same company also prints thematic units to use with specific children's books as well.


Most of the activities are fun, there are great worksheets and craft ideas provided and LOTS of ideas to build upon.


Here is an Amazon link for you to look at the material, this was just the first one I grabbed off the shelf. :-) As I said, I have a ton of them and I've never payed full price- I check used book stores or teacher trades!

shoeshoegirl12
by Welcome Squad on Dec. 1, 2012 at 12:55 AM

Thank you for the lead!

I went to that link and the books you recommended me were to elementary.. however, I search within the sight for a book on Trigonometry for Astronomy and a book came up for what I think is how Astronomy's use Math in their career. I don't know for sure... I didn't really have time to read into it much, but I hope it is and there are more books like it out there for different subjects like Paleontology and stuff.

All my friend would have to do, is teach herself how they use "their" Trigonometry in their life based on her previous knowledge on the subject. Or since the boy is so smart, he can teach himself  the book...hahaha. 

Thank you for the idea. And if you come across any other highschool leave books on themed unites especially in Math or Grammar, send them my way!

MyVavies
by Welcome Squad on Dec. 1, 2012 at 1:30 AM
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My advice to you would be, have him start college early for math. Learn that kind of math at a University that has it. Why does it have to be his mother who teaches him. It would give him the college credit.

The only thing that would stink is, he can't go the speed he wants to. If that's what you are worried about, then have the teacher who teaches that subject do some one on one teaching with him instead.

I didn't know ANYTHING about construction math. So, I just had a guy we knew who did that and have him teach my son all the higher level math that construction had to offer.

Just remember, you (or her) don't have to know everything.. there are people sometimes more qualified to teach at a higher advice in certain subjects then we might be. That's the beauty of homeschool. Picking the best for our kids... if it's us or Bob the builder next door.

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