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Please only reply if you have a child with add/adhd.

Posted by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 9:39 AM
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Please no judgment. Thanks. :)

My third grader is currently enrolled in public school. He has severe adhd and is on medicine, he has been on medicine for two years. We noticed he is having negative side effects to the medicine and we feel it's in his best interest to get off the medicine completely and learn coping skills, since we do not want him on relying on medicine to get through the day.  The medicine DOES help him, but we're still getting notes home about his talking out of turn or too loudly.

 What are your tips to getting through the day of homeschooling successfully? My son becomes frusterated and tearful when he is having trouble focusing or when a subject does not come easily to him.

I am really scared to homeschool because when we did homeschool 2 years ago, he argued over every assignment and it would take him FOREVER to complete a simple worksheet because his mind out easily wander. However I know medicine is no longer a good option for him and he cannot attend b&m school without the medicine. The teachers and staff are already frusterated with him and he is upset with himself because he feels "stupid" for forgetting the rules in the moment. Unmedicated, his life in public school will not be positive.

To add, I will be homeschooling and caring for my two younger children as well. They will be 3 and 2 when we start.

by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 9:39 AM
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Replies (1-10):
AutymsMommy
by Helping Hands on Dec. 18, 2012 at 11:01 AM
6 moms liked this

I'll be honest - I would never take my dd off her medication. When she started having adverse effects on one medication, we switched her to another (only switched once and the new medication works much better). Dosing frequently needs to be adjusted with these meds.

With that said, some ways to help him focus: remember that homeschool is not public school - if he wants to stand and do his work, if he wants to walk around the yard while he reads an assignment, if he wants to chant his spelling words while jumping rope or playing basketball - let him. Movement helps. Also, take a 10 minute "outside play" break after every subject to allow him to decompress. Keep protein rich/otherwise nutritious snack foods available at all times - peanut butter crackers or sandwiches, Nutella and graham crackers, nuts, chicken salad dip for crackers, hummus and carrots, etc. Encourage him to snack WHILE he works - it will keep his hands busy and give him a boost.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














southernwldchld
by Welcome Squad on Dec. 18, 2012 at 11:23 AM
3 moms liked this

My 3rd grader does the same with the frustration and emotional over things. We started sensory therapy and that has helped a lot. He was able to decrease his Focalin. Now we need it mostly for help with focusing. He just can't retain things very well without it. 

We also use some therapy things at home, we make sure he has enough large motor movement especially. Excercise balls are wonderful substitutes for chairs, he gets the sensation of movement without breaking my chair legs. Things like that.

I think if it weren't for his SID therapy, we'd have both been fitted for nice, white coats that *hug* you...

simplysarahd
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:49 PM
1 mom liked this

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I'll be honest - I would never take my dd off her medication. When she started having adverse effects on one medication, we switched her to another (only switched once and the new medication works much better). Dosing frequently needs to be adjusted with these meds.

With that said, some ways to help him focus: remember that homeschool is not public school - if he wants to stand and do his work, if he wants to walk around the yard while he reads an assignment, if he wants to chant his spelling words while jumping rope or playing basketball - let him. Movement helps. Also, take a 10 minute "outside play" break after every subject to allow him to decompress. Keep protein rich/otherwise nutritious snack foods available at all times - peanut butter crackers or sandwiches, Nutella and graham crackers, nuts, chicken salad dip for crackers, hummus and carrots, etc. Encourage him to snack WHILE he works - it will keep his hands busy and give him a boost.

 That's good for your daughter and you. However my question was not about weaning my child off of his medication, my question was asking how to help a child with ADHD get through the day.

Not every child with ADHD is the same, and some children are more prone to experiencing unpleasant side effects than others. The side effects my child is experiencing, have the potential to become permanent our family physician warned. I'm not taking any chances.

My husband has ADHD and has never been on any medication. He is successful and happy. It just took him more effort to learn organization techniques and to create a routine that works for him and how his brain functions. Now he is more organized than I am, and I do not have ADHD. lol  ;-)

THANK YOU for your homeschooling tips, I love the idea of incorporating movement into his learning!

BramblePatch
by Helping Hands on Dec. 18, 2012 at 2:28 PM
I do not have a child with ADHD but my cousin does and she homeschools....successfully and with no meds. I will email her and ask for tips and such and post them here since she is not on Cafemom.
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AutymsMommy
by Helping Hands on Dec. 18, 2012 at 2:36 PM

I never inferred that my advice as geared toward keeping your child medicated. I thought the first person references made that clear.

Quoting simplysarahd:

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I'll be honest - I would never take my dd off her medication. When she started having adverse effects on one medication, we switched her to another (only switched once and the new medication works much better). Dosing frequently needs to be adjusted with these meds.

With that said, some ways to help him focus: remember that homeschool is not public school - if he wants to stand and do his work, if he wants to walk around the yard while he reads an assignment, if he wants to chant his spelling words while jumping rope or playing basketball - let him. Movement helps. Also, take a 10 minute "outside play" break after every subject to allow him to decompress. Keep protein rich/otherwise nutritious snack foods available at all times - peanut butter crackers or sandwiches, Nutella and graham crackers, nuts, chicken salad dip for crackers, hummus and carrots, etc. Encourage him to snack WHILE he works - it will keep his hands busy and give him a boost.

 That's good for your daughter and you. However my question was not about weaning my child off of his medication, my question was asking how to help a child with ADHD get through the day.

Not every child with ADHD is the same, and some children are more prone to experiencing unpleasant side effects than others. The side effects my child is experiencing, have the potential to become permanent our family physician warned. I'm not taking any chances.

My husband has ADHD and has never been on any medication. He is successful and happy. It just took him more effort to learn organization techniques and to create a routine that works for him and how his brain functions. Now he is more organized than I am, and I do not have ADHD. lol  ;-)

THANK YOU for your homeschooling tips, I love the idea of incorporating movement into his learning!


I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














simplysarahd
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 3:30 PM

 Sorry. I guess I didn't see the point of bringing it up. My bad. :-)

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I never inferred that my advice as geared toward keeping your child medicated. I thought the first person references made that clear.

Quoting simplysarahd:

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I'll be honest - I would never take my dd off her medication. When she started having adverse effects on one medication, we switched her to another (only switched once and the new medication works much better). Dosing frequently needs to be adjusted with these meds.

With that said, some ways to help him focus: remember that homeschool is not public school - if he wants to stand and do his work, if he wants to walk around the yard while he reads an assignment, if he wants to chant his spelling words while jumping rope or playing basketball - let him. Movement helps. Also, take a 10 minute "outside play" break after every subject to allow him to decompress. Keep protein rich/otherwise nutritious snack foods available at all times - peanut butter crackers or sandwiches, Nutella and graham crackers, nuts, chicken salad dip for crackers, hummus and carrots, etc. Encourage him to snack WHILE he works - it will keep his hands busy and give him a boost.

 That's good for your daughter and you. However my question was not about weaning my child off of his medication, my question was asking how to help a child with ADHD get through the day.

Not every child with ADHD is the same, and some children are more prone to experiencing unpleasant side effects than others. The side effects my child is experiencing, have the potential to become permanent our family physician warned. I'm not taking any chances.

My husband has ADHD and has never been on any medication. He is successful and happy. It just took him more effort to learn organization techniques and to create a routine that works for him and how his brain functions. Now he is more organized than I am, and I do not have ADHD. lol  ;-)

THANK YOU for your homeschooling tips, I love the idea of incorporating movement into his learning!

 

 

debramommyof4
by Helping Hands on Dec. 18, 2012 at 5:36 PM
2 moms liked this

 I have a child I have been told has the symptoms of adhd but have never had her tested.   We do natural foods, no dyes, natural sugars only and those are cut down to what is on the food pyrimid.  We also have her work in her bedroom and come to me if she needs help while I teach the other kids and I work one on one with her for an hour a day.  She also rides her bike daily except in bad weather and walk or ride bikes to the park at least once a week. 

I dont plan to use medicine with her and since we homeschool there is no reason to have her tested.  She will watch documentaries that interest her and she love to cook and pay for things on her own so we use those things to teach science and math. 

 I have found she likes reading for rewards so book adventure is a great website for her and we discuss history from books I get her to read (magic tree house for now) and things she sees on tv. 

She has a timer and has to write for ten minutes.  I had to keep restarting it at first.  She now knows it will go faster if she starts it and starts writing.  We are using handwriting without tears. 

I do use k12 but most of the time that is a lot of fight to get her to do it. So we may not use it next year.  She does love the computer aspect of it though and when she knows she will get a reward and I do have to remind her, she works a lot harder.  Good luck with your son.

snowangel1979
by Welcome Squad on Dec. 18, 2012 at 5:46 PM
2 moms liked this
My son has ADHD. He did horrible in school. We switched his meds 3-4 times because of the side effects.

The good thing about homeschooling is it doesn't have to be 6 hours plus that bus time that they also have to sit down.

I plan out what I want done for the day and when he's done, he's done for the day. Go ahead and bounce around.

I found timing DS worked. I give him a worksheet or whatever and I give him a time limit. When the times up, we move on and we'll come back to that at the end.
I have a one year old and we do school time mostly during her nap time.
If there's days where I know this just isn't going to work, we do minimal that day. I try not to have too many of those days though. LOL

What state are you in because that will also dictated what you can and can't do.
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KickButtMama
by G.O. Shannon on Dec. 18, 2012 at 10:41 PM
2 moms liked this

Hugs, I'll kkeep my response short as my eldest has Aspergers not add. There is a huge.....Massive.. COMPLETE difference between HSing a pre-k-2nd grader and any grade above it. So I'd say follow your gut. Know there will always be a learning curve for both you (mom/teacher) and him (child/student). But, I , personally, do not think the PS is equiped to accomodate our special needs kids, only to stifle and ridicule them. We are here for you!!

KickButtMama
by G.O. Shannon on Dec. 18, 2012 at 10:49 PM
4 moms liked this

Here's some tricks I use to help my child cope: 

1) we do a child led learning style. It's amazing the level of curiosity that is natural for them. Throw in some basics if you want, but I've never heard of the typical education (books & worksheets) being all that successful w/o medication. We instead incorporate technology, which my son loves, because he is a completely visual learner (he 'understands' the world through images) 

2) I've spent time teaching my son to read his own body. Many emotional outbursts are cascade events - start small then become uncontrollable. But once my son turned 10 he began to better judge the feeling that precipitate a meltdown and we had specific steps we took - ear plugs & sun glasses are like gold here. 

3) we go over a detailed scedule the night before so there are (hopefully) no surprises.

but, I've found that by learning at home - in an environment he fully understands, doesn't feel pressured or judged in, helps keep his anxiety lower as well. 

Quoting simplysarahd:

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I'll be honest - I would never take my dd off her medication. When she started having adverse effects on one medication, we switched her to another (only switched once and the new medication works much better). Dosing frequently needs to be adjusted with these meds.

With that said, some ways to help him focus: remember that homeschool is not public school - if he wants to stand and do his work, if he wants to walk around the yard while he reads an assignment, if he wants to chant his spelling words while jumping rope or playing basketball - let him. Movement helps. Also, take a 10 minute "outside play" break after every subject to allow him to decompress. Keep protein rich/otherwise nutritious snack foods available at all times - peanut butter crackers or sandwiches, Nutella and graham crackers, nuts, chicken salad dip for crackers, hummus and carrots, etc. Encourage him to snack WHILE he works - it will keep his hands busy and give him a boost.

 That's good for your daughter and you. However my question was not about weaning my child off of his medication, my question was asking how to help a child with ADHD get through the day.

Not every child with ADHD is the same, and some children are more prone to experiencing unpleasant side effects than others. The side effects my child is experiencing, have the potential to become permanent our family physician warned. I'm not taking any chances.

My husband has ADHD and has never been on any medication. He is successful and happy. It just took him more effort to learn organization techniques and to create a routine that works for him and how his brain functions. Now he is more organized than I am, and I do not have ADHD. lol  ;-)

THANK YOU for your homeschooling tips, I love the idea of incorporating movement into his learning!


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