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I have an 11 year son who is struggling in a classroom environment behaviorally. His grades are pass plus in almost all subjects and pass in everything else. He has adhd and odd. He is on the verge of being removed from regular class and put in a class with kids with behavior issues. It is a smaller class size and taught by a teacher who can actually help redirect him and work with him better when he gets angry and disruptive. He does show some anger at home with his brother, but for the most part I do not have problems with him at home. My husband and I are now looking at homeschooling for next year, depending on what happens for the remainder of this school year.

My concern is, I don't think I would be very good at it! I was a terrible student myself. I am Afraid I won't be able to teach them, especially as they go into higher grades. My other concern is how do I teach at home two different grade levels? My son with problems is 5th grade, and his sister is too (twins), but they both work at different speeds. My oldest is 6th grade. They all have excellent grades currently. Although my daughter has some language arts difficulty, she is still getting a B-. 

Have any of you taken on homeschooling with these concerns?

by on Mar. 1, 2013 at 8:22 AM
Replies (11-14):
DyslexiaParent
by Welcome Squad on Mar. 6, 2013 at 11:09 AM
1 mom liked this

I took on homeschooling with vastly different needs between my two boys, and likewise, we began homeschooling when my son was 11.  Homeschooling a child with ADHD or other learning issues can be so successful in MANY ways!  IN fact, you might find it interesting to know a research study of homeschooled students with ADHD taught by moms with high school diplomas versus kids with the same disabilities and cognitive levels taught in a small group by a teacher with a Master's Degree found that the homeschooled students outpaced their publicly schooled peers in all areas.  The reason was attributed to the one-on-one teaching, a mom's ability to tell if her child is academically engaged at any given moment or not, and because the moms focused more on what the child COULD do whereas the schools focused more on what the child COULDN'T do! 

As far as how to practically manage the differing learning levels, I set up a learning plan where I would work one-on-one with one child while the other was engaged in some computer-based learning program, watching educational television or a DVD, or working on independent reading.   The schedule had alternating blocks of time, which also worked well for giving each child time to work independently then have time with me.

I will say, homeschooling was the BEST decision we ever made!! Truthfully, my only regret was that we didn't start sooner.  Had I known then how well it would serve my children, I wouldn't have hesitated, but I was terribly unsure of my ability to manage.. I was afraid I was too disorganized, impatient, and that I wouldn't be able to help my son very well.  My singluar goal when we started was simply to do better than the public school had done in reaching and teaching my son.. We surpased that measure by leaps and bounds!!

Best Wishes,
SandyKC,
M.S. Instructional Design, Homeschooling Mom of "Light of My Life" Boys,
Owner of LearningAbledKids, Author of "Overcoming Your Fear of Homeschooling," Special Education Advocate and Individualized Instruction Design Consultant


Threescoops
by Testing the waters on Mar. 15, 2013 at 5:25 PM

Thanks ladies. After my son came home today stressed to the max because he felt like he had a good day but only got 5/8 on his behavior contract plan, I really feel like HS is the ONLY option for him to feel good about himself. I am still worried about taking it on. 

But another concern I now have is what about social skills. It seems like he has trouble making good decisions in a social atmosphere. HS won't give him the chance to meet peers. Now you may say community organizations etc. But he doesn't want to do anything (like boys/girls club, sports etc) And we are getting ready to move in to a new home (new neighborhood, new school district etc. And we may be choosing a home that is in the rural areas and there won't be a neighborhood per se.) So, in the long run, when he has to get a job and be able to work with all personality types, is HS going to hinder him?

maggiemom2000
by Helping Hands on Mar. 15, 2013 at 11:26 PM
1 mom liked this

I think that having him feel good about himself is very important. He is forming his self image right now and every day he is told that he's not doing things right is potentially damaging.

I understand your social concerns, but ask yourself this. Has being in school, do far, helped him to develop to where you feel he should be socially? How do you picture him doing socially in school in the next few years? Do you think keeping him in school will be the best way for him to learn to make better choices in social situations?

The reality is, unless you keep him in a closet, he is going to learn social skills. Everything you do is a chance to learn social skills: going to the market, the post office, getting together with cousins, going to the park.

I understand boys who don't want to do any activities outside the home, I have two who are 11 & 12. We live in a rural area and there are not many options.

Ill be honest, my kids don't have a lot of friends they hang out with on a regular basis, but they are happy and they do just fine socially. They have both gone to sleep away camp for a week in the summer and did great with the other friends and had friends who the e-mailed when they got home, etc. They get together with cousins, the play with a variety of ages of kids in the neighborhood. We do things together as a family.

The reality is that most if what we all call socialization is learned at home with our immediate family. There is no other place in the "real world" where you are segregated to be only with people your exact same age who live in basically the same neighborhood. When you go to work there are people of a variety of ages and backgrounds.

Which will hinder him more in the future, a poor self image from repeatedly "failing" at school, or less daily contact with peers of his same age?

I really think kids "need" peers a lot less than our society leads us to believe!

Quoting Threescoops:

Thanks ladies. After my son came home today stressed to the max because he felt like he had a good day but only got 5/8 on his behavior contract plan, I really feel like HS is the ONLY option for him to feel good about himself. I am still worried about taking it on. 

But another concern I now have is what about social skills. It seems like he has trouble making good decisions in a social atmosphere. HS won't give him the chance to meet peers. Now you may say community organizations etc. But he doesn't want to do anything (like boys/girls club, sports etc) And we are getting ready to move in to a new home (new neighborhood, new school district etc. And we may be choosing a home that is in the rural areas and there won't be a neighborhood per se.) So, in the long run, when he has to get a job and be able to work with all personality types, is HS going to hinder him?


Threescoops
by Testing the waters on Mar. 19, 2013 at 9:17 AM


Thanks for putting it into a better perspective. This is very true. School is doing more harm than good for his self confidence. I started making a list of to do's to start home schooling. I feel very anxious, but kinda excited about it as well. He has voiced that he would like to be homeschooled as well. So now to just start gathering information for my state requirements (Indiana) and move forward to be ready for next grade (6th). We only have 2 months left of this school year, and I currently work a few hours during the day at a elementary school as a recess aid. So we will have to get through the rest of this year. I really am glad that I have this group to come to for help and clarity as we move towards HS. Thank you so much! L

Quoting maggiemom2000:

I think that having him feel good about himself is very important. He is forming his self image right now and every day he is told that he's not doing things right is potentially damaging.

I understand your social concerns, but ask yourself this. Has being in school, do far, helped him to develop to where you feel he should be socially? How do you picture him doing socially in school in the next few years? Do you think keeping him in school will be the best way for him to learn to make better choices in social situations?

The reality is, unless you keep him in a closet, he is going to learn social skills. Everything you do is a chance to learn social skills: going to the market, the post office, getting together with cousins, going to the park.

I understand boys who don't want to do any activities outside the home, I have two who are 11 & 12. We live in a rural area and there are not many options.

Ill be honest, my kids don't have a lot of friends they hang out with on a regular basis, but they are happy and they do just fine socially. They have both gone to sleep away camp for a week in the summer and did great with the other friends and had friends who the e-mailed when they got home, etc. They get together with cousins, the play with a variety of ages of kids in the neighborhood. We do things together as a family.

The reality is that most if what we all call socialization is learned at home with our immediate family. There is no other place in the "real world" where you are segregated to be only with people your exact same age who live in basically the same neighborhood. When you go to work there are people of a variety of ages and backgrounds.

Which will hinder him more in the future, a poor self image from repeatedly "failing" at school, or less daily contact with peers of his same age?

I really think kids "need" peers a lot less than our society leads us to believe!

Quoting Threescoops:

Thanks ladies. After my son came home today stressed to the max because he felt like he had a good day but only got 5/8 on his behavior contract plan, I really feel like HS is the ONLY option for him to feel good about himself. I am still worried about taking it on. 

But another concern I now have is what about social skills. It seems like he has trouble making good decisions in a social atmosphere. HS won't give him the chance to meet peers. Now you may say community organizations etc. But he doesn't want to do anything (like boys/girls club, sports etc) And we are getting ready to move in to a new home (new neighborhood, new school district etc. And we may be choosing a home that is in the rural areas and there won't be a neighborhood per se.) So, in the long run, when he has to get a job and be able to work with all personality types, is HS going to hinder him?




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