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Getting overwhelmed with all the info!

Posted by on May. 14, 2013 at 4:44 PM
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So I am looking at taking my son out of PS and homeschooling him for at least the next two years (2nd and 3rd grade), after that he will probably have to go back to PS because I will be done with college and will have to get a real job.  I am a single mom so staying home with him won't be an option.  I guess I have just found SO much information that I am not really sure where to start or what I need to do to get started.  I worry about making sure he knows what his peers will know so if/when he does go back he is caught up.  I also worry that he will get too far ahead in some subjects.  I know this is kind of all over the place but that is where my head is right now with all of this.  I guess I just want to know if I should worry about what they will be teaching in school or just go with what we want to do and where I should really start looking for cirriculum and project ideas.  We are in FL and we are not a religious family so I would prefer secular stuff.  Thanks for any help you can give me!

by on May. 14, 2013 at 4:44 PM
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Replies (1-8):
Bleacheddecay
by Leader on May. 14, 2013 at 4:56 PM
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Most people who research homeschooling feel overwhelmed at first. That's normal. *HUGS* Take some time and wait for your own instincts to kick in. IMO, at some point you will just feel this method is right for you and go from there. That's what I did. Each year you get to reinvent yourself and your homeschool. Each year your child is older and can have input.

I strongly recommend POC4U to find out your child's levels, best learning styles, how to learn or teach to those styles and curriculum that will work with them.

http://www.diagnosticprescriptive.com/poc4u.html


SusanTheWriter
by Welcome Squad on May. 14, 2013 at 11:23 PM
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It's so easy to get buried under all the amazing info about homeschooling! I found that it helped when I

1) put together a binder/portable file folder for printouts and filed information under different subjects.

2) organized my bookmarks online so I could categorize different sites and get back to them easily for more info.

3) started a journal for myself. I wrote reviews of books I read, articles I came across that resonated, found things I disagreed with, and just had a space to organize my own thoughts. It also helped when I found myself going in circles because once I wrote it down, I could move on instead of covering the same ground over and over.

You might also look around and see if there's a homeschool group nearby that's having a conference or convention soon. There's almost always a meeting for new homeschoolers that includes plenty of Q&A time as well as covering the basics.

Good luck!

celticdragon77
by on May. 14, 2013 at 11:41 PM
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Will it definitely be temporary? If so, can I please warn you that there is a risk in them falling behind in your school district. I only mention this because it happened to my kids. I homeschooled using a Montessori method for preschool, K, and 1st grade. I put them in public school after this. Three years later I am taking them back out of public school because they fell so far behind while in public school. According to the public school, it is because I homeschooled my kids. Of course this is just what happened with us, and isn't what happens to everyone. 

What are your reasons for wanting to homeschool for two years? 

I would recommend that you talk to the school and ask how skills like reading are taught there. I would ask for a curriculum outline (it might be on their website) and I would try to stay within a reasonable perimeter of theirs.

I would try to incorporate all the learning styles. This way he isn't dependent on one that he favors vs what the school will use primarily.

What kind of method do you want to use - maybe this will be less important in your case - but there is classical education, Charlotte mason, unit studies, etc (or a lil of all). Knowing this might help you narrow down where you want to buy from.

Once you know what skills you want to teach, cherry pick the materials you want to use to help him master that skill. Order catalogs by Rainbow Resources and School Specialty. 

Use the library and any free / cheap resources online. Have discussions, maybe do some notebooking. Don't forget to look at teacher resources, blogs, YouTube, Netflix, etc. 

motheroffour186
by Helping Hands on May. 15, 2013 at 8:06 AM

I tested my children to see what level they are at what they know. Then I tested them to see how they learn learning styles.

jetdigitalprinting.com/...learning-style...second-grade.htm

www.howtolearn.com/learning-styles-quiz

http://www.essortment.com/write-own-homeschool-curriculum-second-grade-40038.html

http://www.havefunteaching.com/

motheroffour186
by Helping Hands on May. 15, 2013 at 8:15 AM

 I home school my oldest children and they had problems too it was different styles of schooling then we did at home my older daughter know it she just she was asking questions is this what my teacher meant and why are you not calling on me my hand is up. My older son was this school learning styles were different we had to reteach him math at home because he was not understanding the teaching.


Quoting celticdragon77:

Will it definitely be temporary? If so, can I please warn you that there is a risk in them falling behind in your school district. I only mention this because it happened to my kids. I homeschooled using a Montessori method for preschool, K, and 1st grade. I put them in public school after this. Three years later I am taking them back out of public school because they fell so far behind while in public school. According to the public school, it is because I homeschooled my kids. Of course this is just what happened with us, and isn't what happens to everyone. 

What are your reasons for wanting to homeschool for two years? 

I would recommend that you talk to the school and ask how skills like reading are taught there. I would ask for a curriculum outline (it might be on their website) and I would try to stay within a reasonable perimeter of theirs.

I would try to incorporate all the learning styles. This way he isn't dependent on one that he favors vs what the school will use primarily.

What kind of method do you want to use - maybe this will be less important in your case - but there is classical education, Charlotte mason, unit studies, etc (or a lil of all). Knowing this might help you narrow down where you want to buy from.

Once you know what skills you want to teach, cherry pick the materials you want to use to help him master that skill. Order catalogs by Rainbow Resources and School Specialty. 

Use the library and any free / cheap resources online. Have discussions, maybe do some notebooking. Don't forget to look at teacher resources, blogs, YouTube, Netflix, etc. 


 

AutymsMommy
by Helping Hands on May. 15, 2013 at 9:40 AM

If you are definitely only homeschooling for two years, I would recommend you stick with an accredted homeschool curriculum like Calvert - this would ensure that your child is where he needs to be when he goes back to school.

If this isn't an option (because it is pricey), I would build a curriculum that somewhat mimicks what they will learn in school, for the same reasons.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














kmath
by Welcome Squad on May. 15, 2013 at 10:22 AM

I don't know if it is definite.  I graduate college (again) in two years.  The job I have now allows me to have my son with me and I am doing the distance learning program so I am able to be home with him all day.  When I graduate I might have to get a different job because the one I have now is pretty much part time and I will need full time to pay all the bills and pay back my loans.  If something changes in that time and I don't have to get another job then I will continue hs for as long as I can. 

I am thinking I am going to do unit studies.  I don't think he will have a problem keeping up with math and reading, he is already ahead of his class in both and should remain that way.  They don't have accelerated classes till 4th grade here so he is getting bored at school and I don't want that. 

Thank you all for your advice!  This has already been an adventure and an eye opener and I am just getting started doing research. 


debramommyof4
by Helping Hands on May. 15, 2013 at 10:24 AM
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 If you want to stick kind of close to how the school teaches.  K12 is an option.  I dont plan on putting my kids back in public school unless they ask, but if they ask I will.  I just worry about teaching them at a level that is challenging for them.  If they get it then we move on.

If they go back to public school I will help them as they need help and work with thier teachers to make that work also.

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