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Need help with homeschooling for Pre-School

Posted by on Jun. 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM
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Okay. I came here to learn more about homeschooling. My husband and I have a 2 year old with Sensory Disorder. We have no clue and I mean no clue what to do or start. We know that we need to start now because her special services supervisor is trying to get us to have her attend three pre-schools in our area that are closely tied to the School District.

My husband wants something Christian Based. I am not sure. I am the one in charge of getting all the information, presenting it to him, and doing the rest of the work. So I have no idea what or where to begin.Have noticed that some sites say to either become a private school, add yourself to a private school, or even add yourself to the local school district's Independent Studies Program. This is just confusing.

I live in Southern California.

So any help or directions would be appreciated. Thank you.

by on Jun. 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM
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Replies (1-7):
Bleacheddecay
by Leader on Jun. 4, 2013 at 7:29 PM

I had to look this up because I don't know much about it. Turns out my ADHD girl has some of these issues. So I anyway, started with this information.

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/sensory-processing-disorder


Treatment for Sensory Processing Disorder

Many families with an affected child find that it is hard to get help. That's because sensory processing disorder isn't a recognized medical diagnosis.

Despite the lack of widely accepted diagnostic criteria, occupational therapists commonly see and treat children and adults with sensory processing problems.

Treatment depends on a child's individual needs. But in general, it involves helping children do better at things they're not good at and helping them get used to things they can't tolerate.
Treatment for Sensory Processing Disorder continued...

Treatment for sensory processing problems is called sensory integration. The goal of sensory integration is to challenge a child in a fun, playful way so he or she can learn to respond appropriately and function more normally.

One type of therapy is called the Developmental, Individual Difference, Relationship-based (DIR) model. The therapy was developed by Stanley Greenspan, MD, and Serena Wieder, PhD.

A major part of this therapy is the "floortime" method. The method involves multiple sessions of play with the child and parent. The play sessions last about 20 minutes.

During the sessions, parents are first asked to follow the child's lead, even if the playtime behavior isn't typical. For example, if a child is rubbing the same spot on the floor over and over, the parent does the same. These actions allow the parent to "enter" into the child's world.

This is followed by a second phase, where parents use the play sessions to create challenges for the child. The challenges help pull the child into what Greenspan calls a "shared" world with the parent. And the challenges create opportunities for the child to master important skills in areas such as:

    Relating
    Communicating
    Thinking

The sessions are tailored to the child's needs. For instance, if the child tends to under-react to touch and sound, the parent needs to be very energetic during the second phase of the play sessions. If the child tends to overreact to touch and sound, the parent will need to be more soothing.

These interactions will help the child move forward and, DIR therapists believe, help with sensory issues as well.

Then I googled sensory disorders homeschooling curriculum and found the following:


http://www.time4learning.com/SensoryProcessingDisorder.shtml

http://spdsupport.org/articles/18-jumping-off-cliff-homeschooling.shtml

http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/what-type-of-school-is-best-for-an-spd-child.html

http://www.brighthubeducation.com/toddler-activities-learning/106085-recommended-curriculum-for-two-year-olds/

After looking at all this, if I were you, I would work to making sure my child had the therapies she needed, and research Montessori homeschooling.


Here are some resources for that.

http://simplehomeschool.net/montessori-at-home/

http://www.montessoritraining.net/curriculum_materials/infant_toddler_program.htm

http://www.montessorifortheearth.com/

http://pinterest.com/lnmontessori/toddler-montessori/


Of course you know that you don't have to do anything legally since your child is so young. You can do what you want.

I would try baby sign too if you haven't already been doing that.

You can put as much religion as you want into your homeschooling life regardless of it being in curriculum or not.

maggie13
by Testing the waters on Jun. 11, 2013 at 2:05 AM

Thank you for all your help and the information. I will look into the links you have posted.

Wyokrys
by on Jun. 11, 2013 at 2:11 AM

I guess I'm a little comfused. To get her services they are saying you need to join such and such preschool, but you want to home school? Im a teacher at developmental preschool and my classroom is actually the one that sensory kiddos go to. But my school offers home therapy sessions or by appointment, or you can bring them into my classroom where we work on their IEPs and they receive services during school,  or they go to a private day care and therapists travel there , and its state funded. 

Wyokrys
by on Jun. 11, 2013 at 2:14 AM

Are you looking for the reasons to put your child into a preschool or ways to teach with the sensory needs at home (which I could give you LOADS of info on)

debramommyof4
by Helping Hands on Jun. 11, 2013 at 12:15 PM
1 mom liked this
I am in southern California also. Til your dd is 6 you do not have to register. Something that I like that is free and has bible is Cullen's ABCs.com. I am mobile so I can not make it clicky. But they give you lesson plans and there are videos. So you can do a mixture. We also do play baskets with lacing cards. I know you can make your own but we bought ours from lakeshore learning.
maggie13
by Testing the waters on Jun. 12, 2013 at 2:41 AM



Quoting Wyokrys:

I guess I'm a little comfused. To get her services they are saying you need to join such and such preschool, but you want to home school? Im a teacher at developmental preschool and my classroom is actually the one that sensory kiddos go to. But my school offers home therapy sessions or by appointment, or you can bring them into my classroom where we work on their IEPs and they receive services during school,  or they go to a private day care and therapists travel there , and its state funded. 


They want us to use a preschool that is only connected with the school district. She has early intervention now but at 3 will need to do something with preschool and the school district. We have therapists who come out once a week for physical, occupational, and speech. 


maggie13
by Testing the waters on Jun. 12, 2013 at 2:55 AM



Quoting Wyokrys:

Are you looking for the reasons to put your child into a preschool or ways to teach with the sensory needs at home (which I could give you LOADS of info on)


We want to help fill the gap in during the years between now and grade K. Her sensory issues are all over the board. She has trouble with touch, especially with her anything touching her fingers. This problem has made eating difficult. She also is very clumpsy and runs into things head on. Sitting still is really a challenge...we have been allowed to use a pressure vest from the therapists when they visit. So we are looking into homeschooling her and learning more about what we will need to do for her to help her with learning and concentrating. I do hope that made sense.

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