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Withdrawing Mid-Year...how to do in the least awkward way possible

Posted by on Mar. 16, 2014 at 9:50 PM
  • 6 Replies
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Hello everyone,

     I will be withdrawing my son from his school mid-year and I just now realize it might not be as easy as I thought. I'm hoping I could recieve some advice to make that transition flow easily (without burning bridges basically).

     So his school is great, and his teacher is awesome. I just love her...my son is very active and transferred to his current school from another school where he would kick and scream to not go every morning. His old teacher was very rude to me, and I shutter to think how she was with him when noone was watching. He's in kindergarten. Anyway, the experience has made me just appreciate his current teacher even more. She's patient, happy and just great with my son...so bottom line is, I don't want her to take it personal that I'm choosing to homeschool him. 

What is the best way for me to withdraw him without his teacher, or his school's staff, to take it personal and think I found something wrong with them? I'm a bit shy, so if I don't plan on what to say/do when withdrawing him, I more likely will just stay silent around them, and it may result in them just thinking that exact thing. 

I'm from Texas, so the laws of homeschooling are as lenient as they come; i.e. no necessary curriculum checks, or yearly tests to see progress, etc.

Tomorrow is the first day back from spring break, and I originally planned on the last day before his spring break to be his last day, but then I found out that I need to give his school at least 1 day notice for them to gather withdrawpapers. I actually do want his cumulative papers too; like his past test scores, etc. 

Any advice to withdraw him on good terms? I appreciate his school, and want to let them know that, but I also want them to respect mydecision? 

Thanks in advance :)

by on Mar. 16, 2014 at 9:50 PM
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Replies (1-6):
wendythewriter
by Helping Hands on Mar. 17, 2014 at 8:44 AM
1 mom liked this

"I'm doing this because I feel it's what's best for my son and our family. It has nothing to do with the school, or you as a teacher, or anything that has happened here. It is a purely personal decision made based on what our family and our son needs right now."

There's only so much you can do to prevent them taking it personally. No matter how you put it, if someone wants to take it personally, they will. People who want to be offended will find a way to be offended because you state that the sky is blue or that it's raining today. So you just tell them that you're doing this, and why you're doing it, and let their feelings be their own. If they feel the need to be offended, then maybe they need to look at what they're doing or not doing that makes them feel so inadequate.

MommyFairy1
by Testing the waters on Mar. 17, 2014 at 11:10 AM


Quoting MommyFairy1:

Hello everyone,

     I will be withdrawing my son from his school mid-year and I just now realize it might not be as easy as I thought. I'm hoping I could recieve some advice to make that transition flow easily (without burning bridges basically).

     So his school is great, and his teacher is awesome. I just love her...my son is very active and transferred to his current school from another school where he would kick and scream to not go every morning. His old teacher was very rude to me, and I shutter to think how she was with him when noone was watching. He's in kindergarten. Anyway, the experience has made me just appreciate his current teacher even more. She's patient, happy and just great with my son...so bottom line is, I don't want her to take it personal that I'm choosing to homeschool him. 

What is the best way for me to withdraw him without his teacher, or his school's staff, to take it personal and think I found something wrong with them? I'm a bit shy, so if I don't plan on what to say/do when withdrawing him, I more likely will just stay silent around them, and it may result in them just thinking that exact thing. 

I'm from Texas, so the laws of homeschooling are as lenient as they come; i.e. no necessary curriculum checks, or yearly tests to see progress, etc.

Tomorrow is the first day back from spring break, and I originally planned on the last day before his spring break to be his last day, but then I found out that I need to give his school at least 1 day notice for them to gather withdrawpapers. I actually do want his cumulative papers too; like his past test scores, etc. 

Any advice to withdraw him on good terms? I appreciate his school, and want to let them know that, but I also want them to respect mydecision? 

Thanks in advance :)

Thanks so much. I agree :)

I've decided to write the principal a "letter of intent" but also including that my son loved the school and his teacher as well. 

And also, I'll send a thank you card to his teacher for all her work. But since his last day of school was before spring break, and he had a family picnic/party at his school, I want to just mail the cards and have that day as being son's last at the school. 

THanks again for the advice!

Poosaloosa
by Welcome Squad on Mar. 17, 2014 at 10:51 PM

I just took my son out of kindergarten.  He had a wonderful teacher, and went to a great school.  But he was having some issues with full day kindergarten and the fact that he had a sub 1-2 days a week.  I decided home school was a better option for us.  I just wrote a very nice letter and said that he I had no problems with the school or his teacher, in fact I thought he was getting an excellent education.  No questions were asked at all. 

MomFantastic
by on Mar. 23, 2014 at 4:29 PM

you are so smart not to burn bridges. You can homeschool K and the early years then maybe you will decide to go back.  
My child was a top student and I stupidly agreed to go into the office with the principal and counselor while they tried to pressure me. I told them "I so appreciate your caring. If it doesn't work out, we'll be back."

you do not have to discuss it. 

KrissyKC
by Welcome Squad on Mar. 23, 2014 at 6:22 PM
I have heard great things about the resources available to homeschoolers these days and really want to give us an opportunity to see if that is what suits our family the best.

You are an amazing *teacher, principal, school* and we will miss you.
letstalk747
by on Mar. 23, 2014 at 8:04 PM

 i dont think they will feel any way at all , kids come and go your kid wont be the 1st or last to be withdrawn from a school , dont worry about it.

States can have different things you have to do to withdrawl check yours , but most likely  you can just call the school and tell them you are withdrawing your kid and you would like what ever papers you want mailed to you ,  then send a letter to ESD OF INTENT TO wd and thats it, and this is for kids 7 and older

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