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Can Easter and Christmas be celebrated without religion?

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My husband is catholic....not practicing.  I've seen him go to church maybe 3 times since we have been together. Yes, he does believe in God but has never done anything else.

I'm an atheist but still celebrate holidays.  It's not for the religion but for the tradition and family that I know and have created. 

Well, DH suddenly wants the girls to pray before bed and stuff.  I told him (BEFORE we got togethere and got married) that if he is going to teach him his religion and his life with God, then I'm also going to teach them my life without a God along with other religions and spiritualities. 

I have been talking very openly to my girls about why I don't believe in God and how I think differently than others.  He hasn't said much or done much until now (we are having problems in our marriage).

So, he thinks that it's stupid of me to celebrate Christmas and Easter if I don't believe in God.  This morning, I told the girls that the Easter bunny is coming and he said, "I thought you didn't celebrate that."  Ummm....I CELEBRATE it...I just don't celebrate the religion.


So....this could be controversial......do you think Easter and Christmas can be celebrated without religion?

by on Apr. 3, 2012 at 3:11 PM
Replies (611-620):
jessi2girls
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:36 PM
1 mom liked this

The dates of these holidays were choosen by the Church for the very purpose of trying to convert Pagans, as well as to try to discredit pervious Pagan traditions. To say they didn't "steal them, they changed their meaning.. is like saying the government came in, and said the 20 dollar bill is now worth a penny. It's a polite way to put it, sure, but in the end, it's still stealing, as it's discrediting what the meaning once was. Taking away it's value.. stealing.

The original Christians didn't celebrate with a Christmas tree, you are right, they used a Yuletide log first, (pagan), the tree started in Germany, based on traditions of the Donar Oak (or Thor's Tree), in the 16th century. It was there adopted by Christians.

Santa Claus wasn't a named character at the beginning of Christianity. The legend started with Odin, riding his horse, the children leaving out carrots and sweets for his horse, and he would gift them that night in thanks. Christians at first, rightfully, banned this practice of this legend, as it was against their beliefs. It wasn't until later, St. Nicholas went against the bans, was jailed for giving, and later honored that Santa Claus was brought into Christianity.

The easter bunny never was Christian, but obviously was incorporated because people refused to give up traditions.

The meaning behind Easter is still Pagan.. and really should be renamed...

and you are right, you can't take the Christ, out of Christmas, however you could move the holiday.. but that would result in a huge headache. So, the name of that date SHOULD be renamed, globally, as well to accomidate all, to Winter Holiday or some such name. But again, it's a headache, and easier honestly (considering how many others don't know about the history of these holidays, this post is a perfect example of how many dont know the history behind these holidays, the cultures, traditions, etc).

But.. perhaps this is justice returned back, for taking holidays, renaming them to suite your own means.. now the favor is being returned.

Quoting ragitty:

I don't see where I disproved myself. Christians did not steal the traditions then change their meanings. The pagans who converted brought them with them. The original christians did not celebrate with Christmas trees, santa claus, or easter bunnies. They celebrated the true meanings behind the holidays. Alas, the church, more or less, got taken over by the converts when Constantine made Christianity the official religion of the empire, and the pagan traditions grew more and more prominant as a result, but they did not change the meaning behind Christmas or Easter (granted, I do not know of any word for christianity's easter, although I know it was orignally a pagan celebration). My point is that I am very knowledgable about the history of my faith, and I still firmly belive you cannot take the Christ out of Christmas. Otherwise, you are simply celebrating yule tide, not Christmas.

Quoting jessi2girls:

Yes... you just posted about Christians trying to take over non-Christian (aka Pagan) holidays.. Your entire rant was pointless, as it just solidified why Jesus really had nothing to do with these dates and they were choosen by the church to try to get people to convert... so you just disproved your own point..

and you also contradicted a lot of what you first wrote.. so I don't really see your point...

Quoting ragitty:

We celebrate Easter when we do based on the moon's cycle. When christianity spread, it spread very far very fast, and there was no centralized figurehead who could reach everyone and inform them of where things came from, so a lot pagan rituals were christianized. Originally Easter was celebrated after passover, which used to be observed in the christian faith as well, because early christians still considered themselves to be Jewish. To be honest, I wish we did still celebrate Easter after the Jewish passover, but after centuries of celebrating based on the moon, I don't think it is going to be changed any time soon. The distancing from Judaism occured when pagans wanted to convert to christianity, and the leaders of the church debated whether or not they should first be required to convert to judaism, and then decided against it (I think the main issue was circumsision as far as this issue is concerned). Because of this, many converts did not take the time to learn about the faith's Jewish roots, and when they became the ones spreading the Word, the link was not really recognized. Many of the symbols of the pagan rituals were christianized because people did not want to give up their traditions,  so they adapted them.

Also, we have no idea when the wise men actually came to Jesus. We know it wasn't right when he was born--it was sometime between him being 41 days old and 2 years old. Also, we have no idea what year he was born or even whether or not he was actually born in Bethlehem. That is the belief, but it was because the Gospel writer (I believe it is in Mark's gospel, but it could be one of the others) knew there was a consensus the year he was born, which meant Joseph had to travel to Bethlehem. In reality, the chances of Joseph making his heavily pregnant wife cross the desert on a donkey are probably fairly slim. What we do know is when the magi arrived, the told Harod of their mission. He asked them when they first saw the star, and afterwords ordered the deaths of all boys 2 and under. They could have first seen the star 2 years before Jesus was born and then made it there when he was a baby, or they could have gotten there 2 years after he was born. Joseph then moved his wife and child to Egypt for safety.

We celebrate Christmas Dec 25th because the date was arbitrary, as we have no clue when his birthday really was, and when pagans were converting, it was easier to adapt their winter solstice/yule tide celebrations than eliminating them because that was one of their biggest celebrations and they wanted to take their traditions with them.

The reason Jews don't accept Jesus as the messiah is they do not believe he is the son of God. For the most part, they think he was a great man and prophet, but not the promised son of God. For centuries they had been told how God was sending them a savior to free them from sin and suffering, so they were most likely expecting someone more like a warrior. Jews had been persecuted for so many years so you cannot blame them for expecting a warrior to free them from, at the time, Roman rule. I do not entirely blame them, to be honest. After centuries of hearing about the second coming, I wonder if I would be able to accept it when it does happen, or if I will just disregard it as another crazy person claiming to be Jesus. 

Most likely Jews do not believe Jesus is the son of a virgin, but that is okay. It is a miracle, and they still believe in miracles, just not that one. Most faiths believe in some form of miracles, so I do not think it is fair to ridicule one faith's miracle unless you are ridiculing every faith's miracles.

Quoting jessi2girls:


Quoting annburger:

No, absolutely  not .  Because  that  is  what  these two  special  holidays  are  all  about.  Jesus  was  born  Christmas  and  He  died  on  the  cross  on  Good  Friday,  for  us--  all  of  us  to  forgive  our  sins.  On  Easter  Jesus  rose  again  from  the  dead  and  went  into  Heaven.  Jesus  is  God's  son.  Without  God, we  have  nothing.  I  realize  it  is  difficult  to  understand  all  this.  That's  where  Faith  comes  in.  We  just  have  to  trust  God  that  he  is  always  looking  out  for  us.  And  we  need  to  believe  in  God.  Our  reward  is  being  with  Him  someday  in  Heaven, a  perfect, beautiful  place  with  no  sickness  or  pain.  Trusting  in  God  makes  our  life  a  little  easier,  having  Him  to  lean  on.

UGH!! I swear I've responded to the same post I don't know how many times in this post..

You christians seriously need to educate yourselves on not only your own religious histories, but the histories of these holidays!!

1-No, that's NOT what these holidays are all about. Easter, has NOTHING to do with Christ.. Easter was around long before Christ was even born.  It was started to celebrate the Germanic Goddess Ostara (where the term Easter came from, there are also additional spellings to her name), who was the Goddess of fertility. The bunny, the eggs, etc, are all symbols used to represent fertility during this holiday. Christ wasn't resurrected until after passover.. grab your calendar.. you'll see passover starts the 7th of this month.. easter is the 8th.. so why are you celebrating his resurrection before he was even crucified this year? Why hunt for eggs? Celebrate the easter bunny? It's because you know nothing about the very holiday you are celebrating. NOW.. if you want to celebrate his resurrection, go to church, after passover (as that is when this occurred), and have a feast after.. and call it.. Resurrection Day.. or whatever..

2-Jesus was not born on Christmas.. my gosh.. you think the wise men walked through the snow? no. He was likely born in September, but could have been born from spring to fall. It wasn't winter.. that much we know. The tree.. Santa flying with reindeer delivering gifts, the decorations.. all from a multiple number of Pagan traditions.. Oh.. but there are many son's of Gods born on Dec. 25th (born of a virgin, blah blah blah), long before Christ.. but not Christ. He wasn't born the 25th (I wonder if this is why the Jews won't accept him as the Messiah.. I may have to research that myself after this). So..

I realize. it's difficult for you to understand that you are infact celebrating Pagan traditions and holidays.. but, if you truly believe in God, the least you can do is educate yourself about the very holidays you celebrate, and not just believe everything you hear just because your priest and family said it was so.. that's how crazy cults get started..





jessi2girls
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:39 PM

one: Your only tells you to celebrate 3 holidays.. none of which you celebrate I bet. (most christians don't, only the Jewish seem to follow this).

Two: your bible DOES tell you not to participate in pagan rituals, or to adopt their traditions.. yet you do both while celebrating these two holidays as they are both Pagan in origin.

Three: this leads me to believe you haven't learned much from church, and that you really don't read the bible, or if you do, you don't understand it.

If you would like clarification, I can show you, both biblically, and through christian religious sites so as not to be biased, why your assumptions are incorrect.

Quoting littlepinkrose:

I just state things and celebrate how my church and the Bible tells me which I believe to be true.  No one can change my mind just like we cannot change yours.

Quoting jessi2girls:


Quoting Redwall:

I'm not sure how you an celebrate Easter or Christmas without religion as they're religious holidays....

they are also holidays filled with traditions and cultures and history, which is how most celebrate them.



jessi2girls
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:46 PM


Quoting praisinghim2day:


Quoting jessi2girls:


Quoting praisinghim2day:

Quoting FindersKeepers:




I am actually very educated. I own my own business. I am also educated on the Bible. Taught Sunday school for 10+ years. Just because I choose not to learn about things that you do does not make me uneducated. I am not being judgmental. I stated my opinion as op asked for. Calling names and making assumptions is judgemental. Just FYI.

in what a children's bible?

If you choose not to learn something, you are ignorant about it. if it's relevant to your faith, it makes you ignorant of your own faith. It is not relevant to my faith as it is now.If your faith teaches something is a sin, yet you choose to continue to do something and plead ignorance, it is VERY relevant to your faith.

so yes, in regards to your religion, and this topic you are VERY uneducated. I am uneducated in YOUR religion (or lack thereof), and choose to remain so. Which will teach you even less about your own faith. To fully know ones faith you must know those that are around it, and contributed to it. Basically, it's like going to McDonald's everyday for lunch, and saying you are fat because you are fat, not because you CHOOSE not to understand the obvious, and you CHOOSE to remain uneducated about the nutritional facts.. even though your bible teaches gluttony is a sin..

BTW, making assumptions on your own beliefs, when you have no idea about the culture and history behind it.. and judging others based on that.. kinda makes you a hypocrite too.  I know what is important to MY faith.  Obviously you don't, for you forsake your own Lord by participating in these celebrations.. when he pleads with you against it.

Believers know that the name 'Easter,' used in our translation of Acts 12:4, refers not to any Christian festival, and not to the Jewish Passover. This is one of the few places in our version where the translators show an undue bias. The best explanation is that this refers to the pagan festival of Astarte, also known as 'Ishtar' and pronounced 'Easter' by us. This festival was held in late April around the time of the Passover. In its original form, it was a celebration of the earth's regenerating itself after the winter season. The festival involved the celebration of fertility and reproduction. The common symbols of Easter were the rabbit and (for obvious reasons) the egg. Pagan symbols which have crept into denominational usage.

Astarte or Ishtar was the main female deity, and is known in the Bible as the 'Queen of Heaven'. In Jeremiah 7:16-18, God told His prophet, 'Pray no more for these people... My anger is great! Watch the children gather wood and the fathers build fires, and the women knead dough and make cakes to offer to the "Queen of Heaven" and to their other gods'. She is the mother of Tammuz, who was also her husband, and false messiah of the pagan trinity, who was slain and supposedly resurrects at Easter. Jeremiah (44:17-25) records the Jew's worship of these gods, brought the fierce wrath of God, in the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. These perverted rituals take place at sunrise on Easter morning (Ezekiel 8:13-16).

Here, the bible clearly speaks out against celebrating easter.



jessi2girls
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:55 PM

I see what you are trying to say, that they are more commercialized (the candy we now have in the baskets). Thus takes away from some of the older religious traditions in a sense. I dont' disagree with that at all.

Yes Catholicism and Paganism are very closely linked and tied. I'm glad you note this, and in all honesty, if the bible wasn't hostile toward Pagans, or even athiests (or any other non-believer) and thus making some of it's followers so, the problems in this entire thread, and probably world wide, could probably be reduced to near nothing regarding religious disputes.

I would like to share this:

Believers know that the name 'Easter,' used in our translation of Acts 12:4, refers not to any Christian festival, and not to the Jewish Passover. This is one of the few places in our version where the translators show an undue bias. The best explanation is that this refers to the pagan festival of Astarte, also known as 'Ishtar' and pronounced 'Easter' by us. This festival was held in late April around the time of the Passover. In its original form, it was a celebration of the earth's regenerating itself after the winter season. The festival involved the celebration of fertility and reproduction. The common symbols of Easter were the rabbit and (for obvious reasons) the egg. Pagan symbols which have crept into denominational usage.

Astarte or Ishtar was the main female deity, and is known in the Bible as the 'Queen of Heaven'. In Jeremiah 7:16-18, God told His prophet, 'Pray no more for these people... My anger is great! Watch the children gather wood and the fathers build fires, and the women knead dough and make cakes to offer to the "Queen of Heaven" and to their other gods'. She is the mother of Tammuz, who was also her husband, and false messiah of the pagan trinity, who was slain and supposedly resurrects at Easter. Jeremiah (44:17-25) records the Jew's worship of these gods, brought the fierce wrath of God, in the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. These perverted rituals take place at sunrise on Easter morning (Ezekiel 8:13-16).

The word 'Easter' appears only once in the Bible. Acts 12:1-4: 'About that time Herod the king moved against some of the church. And he killed James the brother of John with the sword. And when he saw how greatly this pleased the Jewish leaders, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (It was during the days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.) And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to sixteen soldiers; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people for execution'.

The key to understanding Acts 12:4 is in the previous verse. This was in 'the days of Unleavened Bread'. The Passover was the feast before the days of Unleavened Bread, so this word does not refer to the Passover, but to some event after the Passover. Herod was not a Jew, and could care less about the Passover. However, he probably kept Easter, in honor of his false goddess, 'the Queen of Heaven', and wanted to slay James, to add a little interest to his PAGAN feast day.

Much has been written that goes far to prove the identity of the Babylonian system of worship within Christendom; but at every step the evidence becomes still more overwhelming. Particularly when we compare the different festivals.

As I found it, researched some of it, and would like to share, perhaps this may show more of where we are coming from as non-believers, not really pertaining to your posts, but especially to those calling non-believers hypocrites, but, as you've politely shared your beliefs, I'd like to just show you, where the bible does speak out against it, and perhaps you can clarify the Catholic perspective here.

Quoting sllytnkrbl:

 I should clarify that although technically I am catagorized as a Christian, I am Roman Catholic - European Roman Catholic.   The traditions I stick to are those of old world Europe so I understand what you are saying even if it seems I don't -- giving hard boiled eggs, sugared almonds, special breads in a basket along with a lamb or rabbit is a very old tradition in the family because of our European roots, this isn't a typical American thing -- in America the basket and bunnies and eggs aren't held in the same traditional sense because of how they are marketed, that is why I say they aren't religious, not because they aren't rooted in religion -- when I say this I refer to chocolate bunnies, candy filled plastic eggs - while the concept is rooted in the past, chocolate bunnies and plastic eggs are a relatively modern addition and not really old world tradition in any religion - they are a play on tradition.  I hope that explains it better.   To address participation in these rituals as pagan, I will go to my european catholic roots, in the early years of christianity the religions were slowly mixed and aspects of pagan and christian faiths were melded together because christians were coming in and recruiting people to their faith - I think
Catholics have a greater link to pagan rituals and traditions then most Christians, it is so engrained into our doctrine at this point that it is just as much Catholic as pagan.   The reason I say those who are atheist aren't celebrating easter is that as a Catholic the words celebration or rejoicing are linked to the reason for the holiday - which is a religious one - if you aren't religious you aren't celebrating the holiday you are celebrating the day but not Easter itself based on the widely accepted meaning of easter.   As far as embracing many belief systems - think about all the rituals in the Christian faith that have pagan roots - while many Christians may go on and on about what Chrisitianity is the fact of the matter is based on history that at one point in time Christianity and Paganism were most definatly closely connected and jointly celebrated, while they may have moved apart I think that Chritians should acknowledge that all religious beliefs are connected and pagan ways (I use that term just to simplify) should be embraced for what they are a part of our roots.

Just to clarify -- in my posts I am trying to stick to the fact that the op is refering to herself being an Atheist and her dh as being Christian so my references to these religions are simply to illude to the op's particular situation.  

Quoting jessi2girls:

Not necessarily, as these go beyond religion to a part of what was our cultures and traditions. But i did misunderstand you with what you were saying yes to, that was my fault. The eggs however do also have roots in tradition, as often times they would hardboil them to make them last longer, then decorated them to give to peasants when they had an over abundance.

I think it's me who wasn't stating my point correctly, hence leading to this misunderstanding.   I was saying that yes, the easter eggs, bunny, etc, do have ties to religion and tradition.. you stated in your first response that they didn't. I was merely pointing out that they actually do.

But yes, you can celebrate anything as an athiest. There are many misconceptions here I think.. See.. from a religious standpoint, if a Christian were to participate in these rituals, it goes against their religion (the egg hunt, etc), as these were at one point Pagan rituals. In that I was saying you really, as a Christian, shouldn't participate in these type of activities associated with Easter. Going to church, celebrating his resurrection sure, that's another story.. but the rest that's related to Easter itself.. no. Okay, lets look at it this way.. for me to participate in Lent, and Good Friday, even ash wednesday, and to attend church, as an athiest, it would be wrong of me to participate in them for my own personal self unless I was wishing to perhaps convert. You obviously, as a Christian can participate in them.  Easter however, is based on traditions and Pagan religions.. the resurrection of Christ in itself is separate from what we associate with Easter.  You can go to church, have a feast, to participate in "Easter" as you celebrate the resurrection of Christ.  Pagans, obviously can celebrate based on their own religious beliefs.  Atheists, can based on traditions and culture, as there were many traditions that are also part of easter that weren't necessarily only religious, they were practical traditions and part of the culture as well.

As for the term "celebrate" vs. "participate".. I'm not sure I understand why you are saying atheists only participate and not celebrate.  Celebrate is to party, or rejoice over something. On MLK jr day, many people celebrate in not only his honor, but what historically took place, pride in their cultures, and traditions that lead up to this. . Yes, Christians celebrate his ressurection, but that doesn't mean there isn't anything else to celebrate. We obviously don't worship the bunny, but that doesn't mean we don't celebrate his place in our culture now, same with the eggs. We celebrate our past, our family, our cultures. Now participating would be for me to attend church.. if I were to participate in the christians (religious) celebrations. As for Paganism.. well.. here let me simplify.. technically, anyone that isn't a Christian, or part of the Abrahamic Religions (Muslim, Judaism, etc), is a Pagan..   pagans embrace many different belief systems.. it's only the Abrahamic religions that preach otherwise.. so all are welcome.

Quoting sllytnkrbl:

 


jessi2girls
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:56 PM


Quoting WilsonGirls3:

Easter is the about the resurrection of Jesus' death. Christmas is about the birth of Jesus. If you celebrate these holidays then you are saying you believe in what these holidays stand for. I believe in Jesus and know that there is a life more
Glorious than I have now. If you do
think there is a God then why celebrate?

Believers know that the name 'Easter,' used in our translation of Acts 12:4, refers not to any Christian festival, and not to the Jewish Passover. This is one of the few places in our version where the translators show an undue bias. The best explanation is that this refers to the pagan festival of Astarte, also known as 'Ishtar' and pronounced 'Easter' by us. This festival was held in late April around the time of the Passover. In its original form, it was a celebration of the earth's regenerating itself after the winter season. The festival involved the celebration of fertility and reproduction. The common symbols of Easter were the rabbit and (for obvious reasons) the egg. Pagan symbols which have crept into denominational usage.

Astarte or Ishtar was the main female deity, and is known in the Bible as the 'Queen of Heaven'. In Jeremiah 7:16-18, God told His prophet, 'Pray no more for these people... My anger is great! Watch the children gather wood and the fathers build fires, and the women knead dough and make cakes to offer to the "Queen of Heaven" and to their other gods'. She is the mother of Tammuz, who was also her husband, and false messiah of the pagan trinity, who was slain and supposedly resurrects at Easter. Jeremiah (44:17-25) records the Jew's worship of these gods, brought the fierce wrath of God, in the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. These perverted rituals take place at sunrise on Easter morning (Ezekiel 8:13-16).

The word 'Easter' appears only once in the Bible. Acts 12:1-4: 'About that time Herod the king moved against some of the church. And he killed James the brother of John with the sword. And when he saw how greatly this pleased the Jewish leaders, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (It was during the days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.) And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to sixteen soldiers; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people for execution'.

The key to understanding Acts 12:4 is in the previous verse. This was in 'the days of Unleavened Bread'. The Passover was the feast before the days of Unleavened Bread, so this word does not refer to the Passover, but to some event after the Passover. Herod was not a Jew, and could care less about the Passover. However, he probably kept Easter, in honor of his false goddess, 'the Queen of Heaven', and wanted to slay James, to add a little interest to his PAGAN feast day.


jessi2girls
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:57 PM


Quoting Iamgr8teful:

I can understand why people have their own way of celebrating Christmas, even without the religious part, but I guess I don't see why anyone would want to celebrate Easter without the religious part.  Bunnies and candy?  Not as impressive as the lights, music, and gifts.  I can understand why your difference in beliefs would be a point of tension in your marriage.  If you want your kids to decide for themselves, as so many atheists claim, I hope you are not trying to make them feel stupid if they do believe in God.  It sounds like they've had more exposure to lack of belief over the years than belief in God, so you probably don't have to try too hard to expose them to your views.  JMHO.

Believers know that the name 'Easter,' used in our translation of Acts 12:4, refers not to any Christian festival, and not to the Jewish Passover. This is one of the few places in our version where the translators show an undue bias. The best explanation is that this refers to the pagan festival of Astarte, also known as 'Ishtar' and pronounced 'Easter' by us. This festival was held in late April around the time of the Passover. In its original form, it was a celebration of the earth's regenerating itself after the winter season. The festival involved the celebration of fertility and reproduction. The common symbols of Easter were the rabbit and (for obvious reasons) the egg. Pagan symbols which have crept into denominational usage.

Astarte or Ishtar was the main female deity, and is known in the Bible as the 'Queen of Heaven'. In Jeremiah 7:16-18, God told His prophet, 'Pray no more for these people... My anger is great! Watch the children gather wood and the fathers build fires, and the women knead dough and make cakes to offer to the "Queen of Heaven" and to their other gods'. She is the mother of Tammuz, who was also her husband, and false messiah of the pagan trinity, who was slain and supposedly resurrects at Easter. Jeremiah (44:17-25) records the Jew's worship of these gods, brought the fierce wrath of God, in the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. These perverted rituals take place at sunrise on Easter morning (Ezekiel 8:13-16).

The word 'Easter' appears only once in the Bible. Acts 12:1-4: 'About that time Herod the king moved against some of the church. And he killed James the brother of John with the sword. And when he saw how greatly this pleased the Jewish leaders, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (It was during the days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.) And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to sixteen soldiers; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people for execution'.

The key to understanding Acts 12:4 is in the previous verse. This was in 'the days of Unleavened Bread'. The Passover was the feast before the days of Unleavened Bread, so this word does not refer to the Passover, but to some event after the Passover. Herod was not a Jew, and could care less about the Passover. However, he probably kept Easter, in honor of his false goddess, 'the Queen of Heaven', and wanted to slay James, to add a little interest to his PAGAN feast day.

Much has been written that goes far to prove the identity of the Babylonian system of worship within Christendom; but at every step the evidence becomes still more overwhelming. Particularly when we compare the different festivals.

jessi2girls
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:58 PM


Quoting katiepolk:

Yes & No I think you can celebrate the commercial part of the holidays if you want but no you can not celebrate the real reason we have Easter of the holidays if you do not include religion. Christmas has become more about Santa Clause then about the birth of Jesus and Easter is more about the Easter Bunny then about the death and resurrection of Jesus. They have both became more of a commercial holiday then they have to do anything with the religion aspect of why we first had the holiday. Honestly you celebrating those holidays is no different than him celebrating Halloween with the kids as a Christian as it is for you to celebrate Christmas and Easter without the real reason for the holidays as an atheist. 

Believers know that the name 'Easter,' used in our translation of Acts 12:4, refers not to any Christian festival, and not to the Jewish Passover. This is one of the few places in our version where the translators show an undue bias. The best explanation is that this refers to the pagan festival of Astarte, also known as 'Ishtar' and pronounced 'Easter' by us. This festival was held in late April around the time of the Passover. In its original form, it was a celebration of the earth's regenerating itself after the winter season. The festival involved the celebration of fertility and reproduction. The common symbols of Easter were the rabbit and (for obvious reasons) the egg. Pagan symbols which have crept into denominational usage.

Astarte or Ishtar was the main female deity, and is known in the Bible as the 'Queen of Heaven'. In Jeremiah 7:16-18, God told His prophet, 'Pray no more for these people... My anger is great! Watch the children gather wood and the fathers build fires, and the women knead dough and make cakes to offer to the "Queen of Heaven" and to their other gods'. She is the mother of Tammuz, who was also her husband, and false messiah of the pagan trinity, who was slain and supposedly resurrects at Easter. Jeremiah (44:17-25) records the Jew's worship of these gods, brought the fierce wrath of God, in the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. These perverted rituals take place at sunrise on Easter morning (Ezekiel 8:13-16).

The word 'Easter' appears only once in the Bible. Acts 12:1-4: 'About that time Herod the king moved against some of the church. And he killed James the brother of John with the sword. And when he saw how greatly this pleased the Jewish leaders, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (It was during the days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.) And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to sixteen soldiers; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people for execution'.

The key to understanding Acts 12:4 is in the previous verse. This was in 'the days of Unleavened Bread'. The Passover was the feast before the days of Unleavened Bread, so this word does not refer to the Passover, but to some event after the Passover. Herod was not a Jew, and could care less about the Passover. However, he probably kept Easter, in honor of his false goddess, 'the Queen of Heaven', and wanted to slay James, to add a little interest to his PAGAN feast day.

Much has been written that goes far to prove the identity of the Babylonian system of worship within Christendom; but at every step the evidence becomes still more overwhelming. Particularly when we compare the different festivals.

littlepinkrose
by on Apr. 5, 2012 at 11:58 PM

I celebrate Christ dying on Friday and being resurrected on Sunday and The birth of Christ everything else is fluff.  And my husband and I do not get into symantics about this stuff.  We are accountable to God no one else I never claimed to be a scholar.

Quoting jessi2girls:

one: Your only tells you to celebrate 3 holidays.. none of which you celebrate I bet. (most christians don't, only the Jewish seem to follow this).

Two: your bible DOES tell you not to participate in pagan rituals, or to adopt their traditions.. yet you do both while celebrating these two holidays as they are both Pagan in origin.

Three: this leads me to believe you haven't learned much from church, and that you really don't read the bible, or if you do, you don't understand it.

If you would like clarification, I can show you, both biblically, and through christian religious sites so as not to be biased, why your assumptions are incorrect.

Quoting littlepinkrose:

I just state things and celebrate how my church and the Bible tells me which I believe to be true.  No one can change my mind just like we cannot change yours.

Quoting jessi2girls:


Quoting Redwall:

I'm not sure how you an celebrate Easter or Christmas without religion as they're religious holidays....

they are also holidays filled with traditions and cultures and history, which is how most celebrate them.




jessi2girls
by on Apr. 6, 2012 at 12:03 AM

okay, I'm on page 31 (301 replies).. I can't keep responding to them all! Oh my gosh..

I've learned 2 things here:

1- a lot of christians honeslty have NO CLUE what they are celebrating, they think they do, but WOW. I've responded to probably 3-4 posts per page trying to correct their understanding of their own beliefs.. but I can't take it anymore..

Christians, if you are reading this still.. read this:

Believers know that the name 'Easter,' used in our translation of Acts 12:4, refers not to any Christian festival, and not to the Jewish Passover. This is one of the few places in our version where the translators show an undue bias. The best explanation is that this refers to the pagan festival of Astarte, also known as 'Ishtar' and pronounced 'Easter' by us. This festival was held in late April around the time of the Passover. In its original form, it was a celebration of the earth's regenerating itself after the winter season. The festival involved the celebration of fertility and reproduction. The common symbols of Easter were the rabbit and (for obvious reasons) the egg. Pagan symbols which have crept into denominational usage.

Astarte or Ishtar was the main female deity, and is known in the Bible as the 'Queen of Heaven'. In Jeremiah 7:16-18, God told His prophet, 'Pray no more for these people... My anger is great! Watch the children gather wood and the fathers build fires, and the women knead dough and make cakes to offer to the "Queen of Heaven" and to their other gods'. She is the mother of Tammuz, who was also her husband, and false messiah of the pagan trinity, who was slain and supposedly resurrects at Easter. Jeremiah (44:17-25) records the Jew's worship of these gods, brought the fierce wrath of God, in the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. These perverted rituals take place at sunrise on Easter morning (Ezekiel 8:13-16).

The word 'Easter' appears only once in the Bible. Acts 12:1-4: 'About that time Herod the king moved against some of the church. And he killed James the brother of John with the sword. And when he saw how greatly this pleased the Jewish leaders, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (It was during the days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.) And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to sixteen soldiers; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people for execution'.

The key to understanding Acts 12:4 is in the previous verse. This was in 'the days of Unleavened Bread'. The Passover was the feast before the days of Unleavened Bread, so this word does not refer to the Passover, but to some event after the Passover. Herod was not a Jew, and could care less about the Passover. However, he probably kept Easter, in honor of his false goddess, 'the Queen of Heaven', and wanted to slay James, to add a little interest to his PAGAN feast day.

Much has been written that goes far to prove the identity of the Babylonian system of worship within Christendom; but at every step the evidence becomes still more overwhelming. Particularly when we compare the different festivals.

and 2: Christians that ARE educated on it.. although few, were the only polite christians in this thread. So thank you, and I apologize to you few if I came off as hostile, however I get offended when people claim I can't celebrate a holiday THEY don't even know or understand. It's a bit presumptuous and rude and hypocritical.. so thank you for putting up with those of us who aren't of your faith and being polite and us getting a bit ruffled and biting back a few of your fellow CHristians. You are not whom we are angry at, and if more were like you, we'd probably all get along  a lot better.

jessi2girls
by on Apr. 6, 2012 at 12:04 AM

Well, please read the following, it's quotes form the bible pertaining to this day in discussion:

Believers know that the name 'Easter,' used in our translation of Acts 12:4, refers not to any Christian festival, and not to the Jewish Passover. This is one of the few places in our version where the translators show an undue bias. The best explanation is that this refers to the pagan festival of Astarte, also known as 'Ishtar' and pronounced 'Easter' by us. This festival was held in late April around the time of the Passover. In its original form, it was a celebration of the earth's regenerating itself after the winter season. The festival involved the celebration of fertility and reproduction. The common symbols of Easter were the rabbit and (for obvious reasons) the egg. Pagan symbols which have crept into denominational usage.

Astarte or Ishtar was the main female deity, and is known in the Bible as the 'Queen of Heaven'. In Jeremiah 7:16-18, God told His prophet, 'Pray no more for these people... My anger is great! Watch the children gather wood and the fathers build fires, and the women knead dough and make cakes to offer to the "Queen of Heaven" and to their other gods'. She is the mother of Tammuz, who was also her husband, and false messiah of the pagan trinity, who was slain and supposedly resurrects at Easter. Jeremiah (44:17-25) records the Jew's worship of these gods, brought the fierce wrath of God, in the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. These perverted rituals take place at sunrise on Easter morning (Ezekiel 8:13-16).

The word 'Easter' appears only once in the Bible. Acts 12:1-4: 'About that time Herod the king moved against some of the church. And he killed James the brother of John with the sword. And when he saw how greatly this pleased the Jewish leaders, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (It was during the days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.) And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to sixteen soldiers; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people for execution'.

The key to understanding Acts 12:4 is in the previous verse. This was in 'the days of Unleavened Bread'. The Passover was the feast before the days of Unleavened Bread, so this word does not refer to the Passover, but to some event after the Passover. Herod was not a Jew, and could care less about the Passover. However, he probably kept Easter, in honor of his false goddess, 'the Queen of Heaven', and wanted to slay James, to add a little interest to his PAGAN feast day.

Much has been written that goes far to prove the identity of the Babylonian system of worship within Christendom; but at every step the evidence becomes still more overwhelming. Particularly when we compare the different festivals.

Quoting littlepinkrose:

I celebrate Christ dying on Friday and being resurrected on Sunday and The birth of Christ everything else is fluff.  And my husband and I do not get into symantics about this stuff.  We are accountable to God no one else I never claimed to be a scholar.

Quoting jessi2girls:

one: Your only tells you to celebrate 3 holidays.. none of which you celebrate I bet. (most christians don't, only the Jewish seem to follow this).

Two: your bible DOES tell you not to participate in pagan rituals, or to adopt their traditions.. yet you do both while celebrating these two holidays as they are both Pagan in origin.

Three: this leads me to believe you haven't learned much from church, and that you really don't read the bible, or if you do, you don't understand it.

If you would like clarification, I can show you, both biblically, and through christian religious sites so as not to be biased, why your assumptions are incorrect.

Quoting littlepinkrose:

I just state things and celebrate how my church and the Bible tells me which I believe to be true.  No one can change my mind just like we cannot change yours.

Quoting jessi2girls:


Quoting Redwall:

I'm not sure how you an celebrate Easter or Christmas without religion as they're religious holidays....

they are also holidays filled with traditions and cultures and history, which is how most celebrate them.





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