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Mental illnesses

Posted by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 2:48 PM
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In light of the events that just happened, the OTHER conversation/debate that really needs to be addressed is mental illnesses.

YES, absolutely, we need more assistance but I'm curious as to what one behavior or more could have stood out as a warning sign to prevent this from happening?

What I'm trying to say is that from what I've read so far, I don't see anything that should have been a warning sign.  It does sound like he had some anxieties and behaviors that were different but many, many, many people are walking around with the same ones but are not deemed a threat.  I will continue to not be afraid of anyone that shows behaviors of depression or anti-social behaviors but people, in general, will automatically assume a crazy man is going to kill everyone.......just like many people believed that anyone that looked like a muslim was going to bomb everything after 9/11.

The challenges of treating them is so big........for example, most of them really don't even experience mental illness until after 18.  What kind of care can you give them if they don't even want to admit they have a problem?  Then if they do, what type of services will they receive?  Who helps them?  Who helps the people that help them?

So many unanswered questions that are not easy to answer.  My point in posting this is that even if he was being treated, we still don't know why he did what he did and we will probably never know. 


by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 2:48 PM
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psych_mom
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 4:23 PM
Mental illness care has gotten really lax in the past 75 years. We don't need labotomies and cruel experiments that they used to do, but most professionals also don't believe in most therapies other than medication anymore either. Most people that suffer from depression need therapy and not just medication, but their primary physician writes them a prescription and they're good to go. Most people with major mental illness such as DID or schizophrenia need more help but aren't seen very often after put on medication. These people can have major problems even after medicated and just snap. Bipolar sufferers can have the disorder to varying degrees and need minimal help or be a major threat to themselves or others. These people need desperate help but due to laws and ethics, providers hands are tied. We can do so little.
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M4LG5
by Valeri on Dec. 18, 2012 at 5:09 PM


Quoting psych_mom:

Mental illness care has gotten really lax in the past 75 years. We don't need labotomies and cruel experiments that they used to do, but most professionals also don't believe in most therapies other than medication anymore either. Most people that suffer from depression need therapy and not just medication, but their primary physician writes them a prescription and they're good to go. Most people with major mental illness such as DID or schizophrenia need more help but aren't seen very often after put on medication. These people can have major problems even after medicated and just snap. Bipolar sufferers can have the disorder to varying degrees and need minimal help or be a major threat to themselves or others. These people need desperate help but due to laws and ethics, providers hands are tied. We can do so little.

When I first went back to therapy, the first thing my therapist tried to do was recommend medication.  It wasn't once but at least the first 3-4 visits.  It finally took me a few times of saying that "I'm not interestested right now" for her to stop asking. 

psych_mom
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 5:18 PM

That is one thing that I am glad about being a counselor or psychologist- I can't write prescriptions. My goal is to try to help my patients heal without medication (I know certain things require it such as bipolar, schizophrenia, DID), but depression and anxiety don't. If I feel that after a certain number of sessions that my patient does need some help with medication, I will have her/him see a psychiatrist for evaluation. I do not want an MD deciding the mental health of a patient, they are not trained for it. A psychologist should not be trying to decide medication for a patient- they are not trained for it. The only person trained for mental health and medication is a psychiatrist but hardly any are utilized these days. Good for you for sticking to your guns.

Quoting M4LG5:


Quoting psych_mom:

Mental illness care has gotten really lax in the past 75 years. We don't need labotomies and cruel experiments that they used to do, but most professionals also don't believe in most therapies other than medication anymore either. Most people that suffer from depression need therapy and not just medication, but their primary physician writes them a prescription and they're good to go. Most people with major mental illness such as DID or schizophrenia need more help but aren't seen very often after put on medication. These people can have major problems even after medicated and just snap. Bipolar sufferers can have the disorder to varying degrees and need minimal help or be a major threat to themselves or others. These people need desperate help but due to laws and ethics, providers hands are tied. We can do so little.

When I first went back to therapy, the first thing my therapist tried to do was recommend medication.  It wasn't once but at least the first 3-4 visits.  It finally took me a few times of saying that "I'm not interestested right now" for her to stop asking. 


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