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Daily Trivia - 1/16/13

Posted by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 9:37 AM
  • 14 Replies

When this 31-year old died in New York of a perforated ulcer in 1926, women rioted in the streets, and some committed suicide. Who was the person who inspired such a strong emotional reaction?

by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 9:37 AM
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Replies (1-10):
wenchmommy381
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 10:49 AM

I can't remember his name!! Grr...

steelcrazy
by Silver Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM

confused

M4LG5
by Valeri on Jan. 16, 2013 at 11:49 AM

Wow!  I have no idea but I'm really interested in hearing about who it is.

Barabell
by Barbara on Jan. 16, 2013 at 1:40 PM

No guesses yet?

steelcrazy
by Silver Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:15 PM

I am dying to google this, but I won't.  

I am going to assume that it would have to be an actor or musician/singer for it to cause that big of a stir.  I've tossed a few names around in my  head and tossed out Clark Gable because he didn't die in 1926.  I know that Houdini died in the 20's but can't imagine women being suicidal over his death.

See, I'm really thinking about it.  I just haven't made much progress.  Maybe typing up my thought process will help someone else.

Barabell
by Barbara on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:00 PM

Your line in thinking is sound. It is an actor, in silent films.

Quoting steelcrazy:

I am dying to google this, but I won't.  

I am going to assume that it would have to be an actor or musician/singer for it to cause that big of a stir.  I've tossed a few names around in my  head and tossed out Clark Gable because he didn't die in 1926.  I know that Houdini died in the 20's but can't imagine women being suicidal over his death.

See, I'm really thinking about it.  I just haven't made much progress.  Maybe typing up my thought process will help someone else.


psych_mom
by Stacy on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:31 PM
1 mom liked this

Rudolph Valentino, he was an actor from Italy. I gave ample time for others to answer today :)

Barabell
by Barbara on Jan. 16, 2013 at 4:15 PM


Quoting psych_mom:

Rudolph Valentino, he was an actor from Italy. I gave ample time for others to answer today :)

Yup, correct!!

congratulations

Barabell
by Barbara on Jan. 16, 2013 at 4:17 PM

I found this section from his Wikipedia page pretty interesting:

Image

Dating back to the de Saulle trial in New York, during which his masculinity had been questioned in print, Valentino had been very sensitive with his public perception. Women loved him and thought him the epitome of romance. However, American men were less impressed, walking out of his movies in disgust. With the Fairbanks type being the epitome of manhood, Valentino was seen as a threat to the "All American" man. One man asked in a street interview what he thought of Valentino in 1922 replied, "Many men desire to be another Douglas Fairbanks. But Valentino? I wonder..."[25] Women in the same interview found Valentino, "triumphantly seductive. Puts the love-making of the average husband or sweetheart into discard as tame, flat, and unimpassioned."[25] Men may have wanted to act like Fairbanks, but they copied Valentino's look. A man with perfectly greased-back hair was called a "Vaselino".[25]

Some journalists were still calling his masculinity into question, going on at length about his pomaded hair, his dandyish clothing, his treatment of women, his views on women, and whether he was effeminate or not. Valentino hated these stories and was known to carry the clippings of the newspaper articles around with him and criticize them.[6]

In July 1926, The Chicago Tribune reported that a vending machine dispensing pink talcum powder had appeared in an upscale hotel washroom. An editorial that followed used the story to protest the feminization of American men, and blamed the talcum powder on Valentino and his films. The piece infuriated Valentino and he challenged the writer to a boxing match since dueling was illegal.[43] Neither challenge was answered.[44] Shortly afterward, Valentino met with journalist H.L. Mencken for advice on how best to deal with the incident. Mencken advised Valentino to "let the dreadful farce roll along to exhaustion",[45] but Valentino insisted the editorial was "infamous."[45] Mencken found Valentino to be likable and gentlemanly and wrote sympathetically of him in an article published in the Baltimore Sun a week after Valentino's death:[46]

It was not that trifling Chicago episode that was riding him; it was the whole grotesque futility of his life. Had he achieved, out of nothing, a vast and dizzy success? Then that success was hollow as well as vast—a colossal and preposterous nothing. Was he acclaimed by yelling multitudes? Then every time the multitudes yelled he felt himself blushing inside... The thing, at the start, must have only bewildered him, but in those last days, unless I am a worse psychologist than even the professors of psychology, it was revolting him. Worse, it was making him afraid... Here was a young man who was living daily the dream of millions of other men. Here was one who was catnip to women. Here was one who had wealth and fame. And here was one who was very unhappy.[47]

After Valentino challenged the Tribune's anonymous writer to a boxing match, the New York Evening Journal boxing writer, Frank O'Neill, volunteered to fight in his place. Valentino won the bout which took place on the roof of New York's Ambassador Hotel.[48]

Boxing heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey, who trained Valentino and other Hollywood notables of the era in boxing, said of him "He was the most virile and masculine of men. The women were like flies to a honeypot. He could never shake them off, anywhere he went. What a lovely, lucky guy."[49]

Valentino's sex symbol status and his untimely death was a biographical part in Dos Passos' The Big Money in the U.S.A Trilogy. His title was the Adagio Dancer.[50]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolph_Valentino

wenchmommy381
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 5:59 PM

GAH!! I could see his face and everything...

This is your week, Stacy!

Quoting psych_mom:

Rudolph Valentino, he was an actor from Italy. I gave ample time for others to answer today :)


Wenchmommy381, International Wenches Guild

"I know that something very strange Is happening to my brain.
I'm either feeling very good Or else I am insane.
The seeds of doubt you planted Have started to grow wild
And I feel that I must yield before The wisdom of a child.
And it's love you bring,
No, that I can't deny
With your wings,
I can learn to fly,
Sweet young thing."
--M Nesmith
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