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Apparently they sold it

Posted by on Jan. 15, 2018 at 10:59 AM
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We filled out a home loan application last week and then received a call from a bank that launched into our preapproval spiel. They called Owen's phone and thankfully he was at work and couldn't talk. When I called the number back it appeared to be local but it was Congressional Bank on the east coast. I knew immediately it wasn't the mortgage company I applied to and was told they got our information from Experien, a credit bureau.

Owen is not high tech at all and was very easily confused thinking this was the mortgage company we are using so it could have been disastrous. We are not using his credit union because they sell off loans and the place I selected does not. My dd highly recommended them because she got her home loan through them without any problems.

I immediately alerted our lender who assured me the site was secure but they use 3 credit bureaus to run your credit. With a credit bureau selling off your information who needs a data breach? Now we are receivng loan information in the mail from unsolicited places which is very concerning. Apparently this is legal, but feels very shady.



Here’s How Much Your Personal Information Is Selling for on the Dark Web
December 6, 2017by Brian Stack
Not everything on the dark web is illegal, but it is a huge marketplace for stolen data and personal information. After a data breach or hacking incident, personal information is often bought and sold on the dark web by identity thieves looking to make money off your good name—and any numbers or information associated with you. (See also: What is the Dark Web?)

What information is most common and how much is it worth?
But just how much is your information worth to criminals? The answer may surprise you. The fact is various pieces of information may be more valuable to criminals and it depends on a variety of factors.

Here are the 10 most common pieces of information sold on the dark web and the general range of what they’re worth—or rather can sell for:



Social Security number: $1
Credit or debit card (credit cards are more popular): $5-$110
With CVV number: $5
With bank info: $15
Fullz info: $30
Note: Fullz info is a bundle of information that includes a “full” package for fraudsters: name, SSN, birth date, account numbers and other data that make them desirable since they can often do a lot of immediate damage.
Online payment services login info (e.g. Paypal): $20-$200
Loyalty accounts: $20
Subscription services: $1-$10
Diplomas: $100-$400
Driver’s license: $20
Passports (US): $1000-$2000
Medical records: $1-$1000*
*Depends on how complete they are as well as if its a single record or an entire database

General non-Financial Institution logins: $1
Note: Prices can vary over time and prices listed below are an estimation and aggregation based on reference articles and hands on experience of Experian cyber analyst the last two years.

How is this information purchased by identity thieves on the dark web?
There are three main ways that personal information is commonly bought and sold on the dark web:

Purchase data as a one-off, such as a Social Security number
Purchase bulk data, batches of the same types of information
Purchase bundled data, this is the “premium” package for identity thieves as it includes various types of information that are bundled together
Myth Buster:

I was the data breach victim many years ago, do I still need to be concerned about my data be sold?

Yes. According to a 2017 Javelin strategy and research presentation the amount of fraud committed based on data breach data that is 2-6 years old has increased by nearly 400% over the last 4 years to $3.7B in 2016.
What drives the cost of personal information on the dark web?
There are four main factors that drive the cost of information that’s bought and sold on the dark web:

Type of data and the demand for that data: as mentioned above, different types of information can bring different monetary values.
Supply of the data: the economic principle of supply and demand applies to criminals buying and selling stolen information. If there’s a lower supply of particular information available for purchase, then that information is more valuable to thieves.
The balance of the accounts: whether dollar values or points in an account, the higher the amount that can be taken, the higher the cost of that stolen information.
Limits or the ability to reuse: if something has a higher limit or can be reused multiple times, it’s more valuable to fraudsters. Alternatively, information that has low limits to use or steal and can only be leveraged once is less valuable.
So what can you do to protect yourself?
This may seem frightening or overwhelming, but it’s important to be aware of what is going on so you can protect yourself. While data breaches are on the rise and outside of your control, you can practice good habits for your own personal information like maintaining healthy password practices, and not sharing your personal information unless it’s necessary.

It’s also a good idea to make sure that you keep your antivirus software and software updates on all devices (computer, laptop, tablet, phone) current as those updates may include security patches that are important to protecting your information.

You can also check out identity protection products for yourself and your family. Products such as Experian IdentityWorks provide dark web monitoring, alerts and a view into your credit report and FICO® Score so you can keep an eye on things and get a heads up on potential red flags for identity theft. You can also run a free dark web scan on your email address.

About the author: Brian Stack is Vice President of the Experian® Engineering group at Experian Consumer Services, leading a team who’s responsible for scouring the dark web for compromised consumer data and incorporating non-credit based data sources such as court records, payday loans, and social network data to produce best of breed identity protection products for Experian consumers and business partners.
Sources: Liv Rowley on Flashpoint, Richard on Dark Web News, and The Hidden Data Economy by Charles McFarland, François Paget, and Raj Samani. Prices can vary over time and prices listed below are an estimation and aggregation based on reference articles and hands-on experience of Experian cyber analyst the last two years.
by on Jan. 15, 2018 at 10:59 AM
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Replies (1-10):
ninamsi
by Philly Mom/Nina on Jan. 15, 2018 at 11:35 AM
1 mom liked this

I went on healthcare.gov and received a ton of calls from supplemental insurance brokers.  It is just crazy.

peggytoo
by Silver sister on Jan. 15, 2018 at 12:03 PM
1 mom liked this

bang head on keyboardfrustratedangry

letstalk747
by Joyful on Jan. 15, 2018 at 12:09 PM
3 moms liked this

Very very scarry , and really pisses me off.

Ziva65
by Silver sister on Jan. 15, 2018 at 12:11 PM
1 mom liked this
It’s happened to us too, particularly identity theft from a stolen purse. Also to my husband, data breach. We received a call once that someone was trying to charge a flight to Haiti, just last month I received a call from an investigator in some city I’ve never been to (from out of state) telling me someone was trying to write a check on my bank account using a fake ID.

Years ago (in the 90’s) someone stole my wallet and charged up each card and wrote checks out all over San Francisco. The police dept told me they bought a car. My mistake too much open credit, too many cards. We cancelled all cards and checks. Then there was a warrant out for my arrest then for writing bad checks, it took years to fix. Even with a police report, and DA involved. The perpetrator seems to have more rights than the victim.

Now I carry only one card with a low limit, easy to track and cancel. It’s hapoened so many times I can’t count.

Even in the 1980’s at my first job, I had to be given a temporary social to get health insurance because someone else was using it. We were both working and paying into my account, but because of privacy laws I couldn’t find out who it was, it stopped years later. It took a long time to fight and the other person was protected. Really?

For several years now we’ve used-one of those card/ Bank monitoring services. It doesn’t prevent it, but at least we get notified. People are unbelievably bold.
RaeMarie
by RaeMarie on Jan. 15, 2018 at 12:14 PM
1 mom liked this

It is insane. My dad nor my husband are internet savvy at all. Right now I am trying to straighten out a magazine scam my husband accidentally got involved in. Ugh. 

looneymom467
by Regina on Jan. 15, 2018 at 12:22 PM
1 mom liked this

I recently got an insurance quote with my info about my car not the vin but the exact car definitely didnt ask for a quote.  I got a loan for that car in Sept.  I hate that they can get your info so easy.

AndrewsMomPDX
by Christine on Jan. 15, 2018 at 3:11 PM
2 moms liked this
It's so annoying

Quoting ninamsi:

I went on healthcare.gov and received a ton of calls from supplemental insurance brokers.  It is just crazy.

AndrewsMomPDX
by Christine on Jan. 15, 2018 at 3:13 PM
3 moms liked this
It feels like such a violation of trust. I assumed a secure site would be okay and didn't realize a credit bureau would sell information.

Quoting looneymom467:

I recently got an insurance quote with my info about my car not the vin but the exact car definitely didnt ask for a quote.  I got a loan for that car in Sept.  I hate that they can get your info so easy.

AndrewsMomPDX
by Christine on Jan. 15, 2018 at 3:17 PM
2 moms liked this
It's amazing how technology can trick people. The bank that called us used a local number but when you call them back they don't identify who they are. It's just awful

Quoting RaeMarie:

It is insane. My dad nor my husband are internet savvy at all. Right now I am trying to straighten out a magazine scam my husband accidentally got involved in. Ugh. 

AndrewsMomPDX
by Christine on Jan. 15, 2018 at 3:22 PM
2 moms liked this
It is amazing how bold and crooked some people are and you've been through a lot. Owen sold a car that was used in an armed robbery but they never changed the car to the buyers name through DMV so he had to get an attorney. I am just shocked that the credit bureau gives out your information.

Quoting Ziva65: It’s happened to us too, particularly identity theft from a stolen purse. Also to my husband, data breach. We received a call once that someone was trying to charge a flight to Haiti, just last month I received a call from an investigator in some city I’ve never been to (from out of state) telling me someone was trying to write a check on my bank account using a fake ID.

Years ago (in the 90’s) someone stole my wallet and charged up each card and wrote checks out all over San Francisco. The police dept told me they bought a car. My mistake too much open credit, too many cards. We cancelled all cards and checks. Then there was a warrant out for my arrest then for writing bad checks, it took years to fix. Even with a police report, and DA involved. The perpetrator seems to have more rights than the victim.

Now I carry only one card with a low limit, easy to track and cancel. It’s hapoened so many times I can’t count.

Even in the 1980’s at my first job, I had to be given a temporary social to get health insurance because someone else was using it. We were both working and paying into my account, but because of privacy laws I couldn’t find out who it was, it stopped years later. It took a long time to fight and the other person was protected. Really?

For several years now we’ve used-one of those card/ Bank monitoring services. It doesn’t prevent it, but at least we get notified. People are unbelievably bold.
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