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Kindergarden teachers, question please (PIOG)

Posted by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:29 AM
  • 8 Replies

I hope you guys feel comfortable answering me with as much honesty as possible. 

I have a question for Kindergarden teachers.  What do you do with children who arrive meeting most of the standards set for that grade level?

Do you worry more about the children who are below the standards?  Maybe thinking that the more advanced students have already meet the standard?

Do you ever refer a child for a rapid learner/gate program?


Thanks for you answers!

by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:29 AM
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Replies (1-8):
jaimesue
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 2:05 PM

I have the same questions...my son will begin kindergarten in the fall and they sent a folder home with things to work on.  He already knows everything on the lost...I wonder if he'll be bored in kindergarten or that it will be really easy and him love that then struggle in 1st grade.

emarin77
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 2:23 PM

I know from past experience children go into classes that are based on their learning levels; especially for reading and math or speech therapy. 

M4LG5
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 2:33 PM

Most GATE programs don't start until 2nd grade....at least that is what it is here.  I'm not a teacher but from my experience with my daugther's kindergarten teacher, she would work with the students depending on their capabilities. 

For example, after a field trip they were suppose to write things about the experience and what they saw.  I was there to see how she encouraged some students to write at least 3 sentences and for some students, like my daughter, to fill up the page. 

Talk to the teacher as you go and stay in touch to see if there is anything you can do at home.

singlemomof2nok
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 2:54 PM

 Both of mine were above grade level in Kindergarten and they put them in higher grade levels for reading and such.  I think it really depends on the school.  I am not a Kindergarten teacher, this is just from what my kiddos went through.

Jennasmom08
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 3:21 PM

I used to teach Kindergarten before I had kids. I had all the kids all day, but I broke them into groups (named after animals and the kids in each group voted on what their group would be called). But we had reading and math groups. Some groups were much more advanced, but the kids didn't know that. While in groups the other children would be at they desks doing worksheets, coloring or doing an art project. Don't worry about it, Kindergarten is FUN and no matter the ability level the teacher will keep them busy, learning and happy :)

MarigoldsMama
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 3:54 PM

I taught Kindergarten and 1st grade before I had kids too.

I agree with the previous posters. As a teacher, I differentiated instruction for all of my students. I had some that could read and write. I had others who didn't even know their letters and sounds. To be honest though, in the district that I taught in, almost all of the kids arrived already meeting the standards. BUT... just because a kindergartner is reading, it doesn't necessarily mean that the comprehension piece is there, KWIM?  It is pretty common for teachers to have reading / math groups based on ability level grouping.

From what I've observed, students are rarely "put ahead." In our district, GATE didn't start until 2nd grade.

I'm actually concerned about my own daughter with this... she is going to be an older, almost-6 year old Kindergartner (November birthday) and she is already 'reading' CVC (consonant, vowel consonant) words and some sight words at 3. I know what a "GOOD"  teacher would do... but you never know who you are going to get! I'll probably try her out at the local public school for Kindergarten but move her to a private or charter school if there is a problem. If worse comes to worse, I'll supplement with homeschooling.

BTW, from a teacher's perspective, it is interesting how almost every parent considers their child to be 'advanced.' :)

thebailiffs
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 5:20 PM

Thanks everyone for your responses.  It is helpful to hear from everyone. 

I am not sure that every parent considers their child to be advanced.

I work with children in Special education and none of my parents or my close friends consider their children advanced.

I think every child has their strengths and weakness, but when a child has meet the standards then I was curious as to what the teacher can do.

Thanks again!

MarigoldsMama
by on Jun. 28, 2010 at 5:41 PM

 

Quoting thebailiffs:

Thanks everyone for your responses.  It is helpful to hear from everyone. 

I am not sure that every parent considers their child to be advanced.

I work with children in Special education and none of my parents or my close friends consider their children advanced.

Sorry about that... I guess I was exaggerating. :0)  Of course, there is a big range in abilities. I didn't mean any offense... that was just my own experience in the school where I taught. (I commuted to an affluent area... a big, fancy, new state-of-the-art school)

 My point was that it isn't terribly uncommon (in my experience)  for kids to enter the school system already meeting the basic standards for Kindergarten.

Of course, you are right --  every classroom is going to have a mix... special needs kids, English language learners, kids who have been read to every day of their lives and kids who have never even picked up a book.

It is the teacher's job to make sure everyone's educational needs are met.

 

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