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I know my kid is "labeled" but I would NEVER do this to him!

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To me this just takes labeling too far...

Yeah because everybody who sees my kid needs to know his label?  Well, at least one of them.  And he needs that constant reminder that he is different?  No thank you!   He doesn't even like me to do his joint compressions in public because he's afraid someone will see.  But I'm really good at doing them in a way nobody notices a thing now.

Then there's these...

they are cards to hand out to strangers when your kid is having a meltdown.  I'm sorry but when mine is having a meltdown explaining to strangers is the last thing on my mind!  And they don't need to know WHY he's melting down.  What they think is their issue.

I guess to me THIS is labeling your child.  Putting it on their shirt and on cards for the whole world to see that they have sensory processing disorder.  Most who know my son know about his but I'm not throwing it out there for say a stranger in wal-mart to know about just because they might think I'm a bad parent.

What do you think about this?


Being a full-time mother is one of the highest salaried jobs in my field, since the payment is pure love.  ~Mildred B. Vermont
by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 1:18 PM
Replies (11-20):
countrymomma81
by Platinum Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 5:02 PM

I guess I don't see it as that big of a deal. But I don't have a child with issues so maybe that's why..I don't know. 

But what are joint compressions and how do they help?

JasonsMom2007
by Lisa on Apr. 24, 2013 at 5:38 PM

They are just what the sound like, applying pressure to his joints to help fill his body with "good" feelings so it's not so easy to get overhwelmed by the bad.

Maybe I'm just being extra sensitive about it because MIL was over here the other day and she's the "oh but they can't do this because I diagnosed them with ____ (every problem in the world)" type.  I'm more of the "well, then I guess we'll have to work to overcome that problem won't we?" type and her attitude really gets to me especially since it's all self diagnosed.  Then she was trying to diagnose my son with more stuff too while she was here!


Quoting countrymomma81:

I guess I don't see it as that big of a deal. But I don't have a child with issues so maybe that's why..I don't know. 

But what are joint compressions and how do they help?




Being a full-time mother is one of the highest salaried jobs in my field, since the payment is pure love.  ~Mildred B. Vermont
KylesMom409
by Linnette on Apr. 24, 2013 at 6:11 PM
Yeah, that's overkill for sure. I would never put my child in one of those shirts.
countrymomma81
by Platinum Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 6:16 PM

Oh, that's interesting!

I see. It sounds like she's more of an enabler than one who pushes them outside of their comfort zone. 

Quoting JasonsMom2007:

They are just what the sound like, applying pressure to his joints to help fill his body with "good" feelings so it's not so easy to get overhwelmed by the bad.

Maybe I'm just being extra sensitive about it because MIL was over here the other day and she's the "oh but they can't do this because I diagnosed them with ____ (every problem in the world)" type.  I'm more of the "well, then I guess we'll have to work to overcome that problem won't we?" type and her attitude really gets to me especially since it's all self diagnosed.  Then she was trying to diagnose my son with more stuff too while she was here!


Quoting countrymomma81:

I guess I don't see it as that big of a deal. But I don't have a child with issues so maybe that's why..I don't know. 

But what are joint compressions and how do they help?




JasonsMom2007
by Lisa on Apr. 24, 2013 at 6:22 PM
Yes she is! She used to tell my bils they couldn't do their homework because (insert random diagnosis) and would send it back to school undone. And she "diagnosed" all of it. She says all of her kids have autism. Trust me my hubby does not have autism in any way, shape, or form!
Quoting countrymomma81:

Oh, that's interesting!

I see. It sounds like she's more of an enabler than one who pushes them outside of their comfort zone. 

Quoting JasonsMom2007:

They are just what the sound like, applying pressure to his joints to help fill his body with "good" feelings so it's not so easy to get overhwelmed by the bad.

Maybe I'm just being extra sensitive about it because MIL was over here the other day and she's the "oh but they can't do this because I diagnosed them with ____ (every problem in the world)" type.  I'm more of the "well, then I guess we'll have to work to overcome that problem won't we?" type and her attitude really gets to me especially since it's all self diagnosed.  Then she was trying to diagnose my son with more stuff too while she was here!


Quoting countrymomma81:

I guess I don't see it as that big of a deal. But I don't have a child with issues so maybe that's why..I don't know. 

But what are joint compressions and how do they help?






Being a full-time mother is one of the highest salaried jobs in my field, since the payment is pure love.  ~Mildred B. Vermont
snowangel1979
by Bronze Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 6:24 PM
I've heard of these shirts and also ones for allergies and autism.

I can see them being good for say a class feild trip, where if a small child is with an adult who isn't familiar with the child or the child gets separated from the group.
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Knightquester
by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 6:43 PM
1 mom liked this

I grew up around a lot of people with disabilities, and the last thing in my family anybody appreciated were labels.

Maybe times are changing, but had my brothers would have been mortified walking around with a t-shirt pointing out their disabilities.  They have far better qualities I'm sure they'd rather have pointed out.

I think my eldest brother would have hated my mother had she handed a card to strangers explaining why he was not acting within the social norm.  It would, I'm sure, seem like he were such an embarrassment to her that she felt the need to explain to strangers.  A parents love really does know no bounds, and part of that is that we have to cope and accept the good moments our children create for us, along with the bad ones without making our children feel inadequate.

The disabilities a person has isn't who they are, it's only a part of who they are just like all those other wonderful qualities they have.  Nobody should have to explain who they are to the world in order to feel loved, appreciated, or accepted.

e-doolittle
by Kelly on Apr. 24, 2013 at 7:37 PM
1 mom liked this

My DS has SPD and I would Never have him wear that or hand out cards.  I realize my DS is different.  If he's having a bad day, ppl are going to know that.  Those are ridiculous IMO.

blcsmommie
by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 8:22 PM

My 8 year old DD has asperger's, adhd and SPD and yes we do have the T-shirt which we wear at autism events and have also on field trips as god forbid she walks off on her chaperone it has my cell number on it yes the cards can be a god sent when you are having a major meltdown in a store and have people who tell you if you would just spank her butt she would not act this way....the cards shut people up quickly and hopefully teach them a lesson on opening their mouths to other parents. We live in a small town where everyone likes to butt in and tell you how to parent and I understand it takes a village to raise a child but sometimes the comments bother me more than the diagnosis it's self.

EvaTheDiva29
by on Apr. 24, 2013 at 9:17 PM

these are great! though ds doesn't have spd, i do feel like i should put a warning label on him when we're out in public.

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