boyYou know how sometimes you hear something that makes you shake your head so hard you wind up all dizzy? Yeah, that's how I felt after hearing about a mom who spends thousands on her 8-year-old son's wardrobe -- and is actually proud of it.

Vicky Antonia is so dead set on her son Zak being dressed to the nines that she admits shelling out over £20,000 on designer name clothes for him. (That's $35,000 a year. OMG.)

Want to know why? Because she apparently likes "dressing him like a doll."

(For reals.)

And when I say designer -- I mean designer. Some of the labels in Zak's closet include Armani, Prada, Gucci, Burberry, and the list goes on.

Of her decision to outfit her son in the best attire money can buy, Vicky says, "I know it must sound like I am spoiling him, but I just want him to look his best, what is wrong with making your son look good? I just didn't know that there was any other way. I didn't think to get him clothes from anywhere else."

Ok, so it's obvious this mom has more disposable income than any of us can hope to have over the course of a lifetime -- but is she nuts?!?

Does she not a.) realize how fast little boys grow out of their clothes, and/or b.) understand that boys are basically magnets for things like grass stains and food spills?

Ever since my son was a baby, I've stuck to stores like Target and Old Navy to purchase all of his clothes, unless he needs some sort of fancier outfit for a special occasion. Sure, some of the pricier brand names offer really cute pieces in their lines -- but I just can't justify spending over $20 or so on something that will likely only be worn a few times before it becomes too small or gets ruined in one way or another.

And don't even bother trying to tell me I'd feel differently if I were a gazillionaire or something like that. Even if I'd been the lucky woman who won the $600 million Powerball jackpot Saturday night -- I still wouldn't shop at high-end stores for my son. Any way you look at it, spending that much on a kid is basically like taking money and flushing it directly into the toilet. And even if you have a lot of it -- who wants to waste it like that?

You never know when your circumstances can change and it can all be taken away in an instant, so isn't it a good rule of thumb to hold off on throwing it away on children's clothes -- at least until they're teenagers and stop growing? (Or until they turn 18 and get a job and can buy their own clothes. That's an even better plan.)

Do you spend a lot of money on your kids' clothes?

 

Image via Stewart Black/Flickr