nurse with clipboardA mom from Michigan is at the center of a sex ed brouhaha. Christy Duffy recently brought her 17-year-old daughter to a doctor's office for a foot injury. In a now viral blog post titled, "I Am the Mom," she recalls how she was met with a sign that read, “A nurse will need to have a short five-minute private conversation with your child.”

Duffy was then told by the office manager that the conversation could cover topics like birth control options, HIV, and STDs and be given to kids as young as 12. She was also told that the new policy allows a child to access his or her medical records online, and the minor has the power to block parents from reviewing the health care documents.

In turn, Duffy did everything she could to opt out of this new policy and has written extensively about her experience.

As it turns out, though, while minors do have the power to block parents from looking at their records, this supposed "chat" is NOT mandatory, as Duffy thought.

According to a woman from the medical facility’s privacy department who got in touch with Duffy, the medical facility "jumped the gun" when posting the sign, because the process for implementing Michigan's law is still under review.

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Still, if her blog post had you riled up, maybe you need to step back and moment and re-consider.

The fact remains that 25 states allow minors to consent to contraceptive services without a parent. That's something parents should be a-okay with. After all, the onus is on them to talk about sex well before a kid even makes it into a doctor's office for those services.

Duffy's complaint sounds like another example of parents denying that their children are going to reach adolescence, wonder about sex, and have sexual urges that, yes, they may very well act on. And isn't it better that a kid learn about sex from a medical source -- a registered nurse -- than friends or the Internet?

Furthermore, who's to say that after a nurse spoke with a teen, a mother couldn't have a follow-up conversation with her daughter or son? If the lines of communication on that subject matter are totally closed off for parents, or they think their kid is just going to adhere to some hopeful vows of abstinence, well, good luck! There are probably MUCH bigger fish to fry than worrying about a five-minute convo with a nurse!

How would you feel about a nurse taking your kid into another room for a talk about birth control options, HIV, and STDs?

 

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