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Posted by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 10:00 PM
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Hi name is Mindi, I have a 7 1/2 year old son who was diagnosed with Aspergers, a mild case of ADHD and dyslexia about a month ago. I'm looking for others experience with how to deal with the meltdowns/tantrums, the anxiety, medication pros and cons, separation anxiety and what to feel when you are newly diagnosed.

by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 10:00 PM
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aprilmaydawn
by on Dec. 21, 2012 at 8:46 AM
1 mom liked this

 HI!

I have found that when my boy is having a meltdown I tell him to go into his room & find a cuddle toy, i have soft lighting in there which I have found tends to help soothe him. When the meltdown is over he will clean up his mess-sometimes its a tornado mess in there-& be done..If we are out in public I calmly leave with him screaming in full meltdown mode, just hike him over my shoulder & go to car. I have found this works for both of us as I'm not feeding into the meltdown by becoming upset myself & sometimes just the change helps him to calm.

Medications were a different story,luckily we had a great patient caring Dr. that helped us find the right med/dose. Here recently I tried melatonin to help him sleep at night but found that wasn't a right fit for him.  The med he is on now & has been for the past year has worked great for him. The only drawback is his daytime appetite is little to none so he eats all night long.

Also having a good support team in place is great also. I have found not to be worried about speaking my mind or standing up for my child & his rights to be empowering not only for me but for him as well.

 

Hope this helps

aprilmaydawn

DDDaysh
by Member on Dec. 26, 2012 at 10:20 PM

Hi.  I have an almost nine-year-old with sort of the opposite diagnosis, severe ADHD with borderline Aspergers plus anxiety. 

It's tough, my best advice is to read what you can and try out different ideas.  What works for one kid won't always work for another, but every time you learn something. 

For instance, while routine and knowing what to expect is important for my son, we have to frequently change motivational tools and because he'll become indifferent to them super fast.

Hang in there! 

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