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I don't know where to start (homeschooling)

Posted by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 7:51 PM
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My husband is in the Army, and currently in Iraq. He is almost done with his tour of duty there (yay!) and will be headed straight to Germany very soon. We will be moving to Germany to live with him very quickly after he gets back. We will be living on base, if all goes right. 

It is seeming that I'll be homeschooling Olivia because she is not vaccinated (on base schooling isn't like state run schools). It was something that we talked about anyways, but she does really need the classroom integration and social building skills, so I enrolled her in developmental preschool this year. She has done AMAZING, after a few problem weeks she just comes home all smiles and filled with new words daily. I do NOT know what will be available to us in Germany. I am trying to get more information, but everyone is busy with the soldiers coming back really soon, and I'm not getting very far (frustrating!). So I'm trying to be prepared to just "homeschool" Olivia at home. But I don't know where to start.

Developmentally Olivia is about 14-16 months old. There are some areas where she is closer to her actual age, but most she is very behind. She cannot have a conversation with you, but she does have some language and it is increasing all the time. She can name some colors, some shapes, count to 10, sing part of her ABCs, and she recites movie scripts. She does not sit still very well, she is a mover. I often have to put her in her highchair (she still sits in one to eat most meals) to get her to focus. We are using flashcards right now, and I had some hope to have a PECs of our own before we leave, but I don't know if that will happen (doubtful). I have not created our own set of flashcards yet, as I always have good intentions, but never get them done and now I just don't have the time to invest in it. I bought a set of counting bears & sorting trays, a shapes workbook (she doesn't get it, but we try), some lacing animals (fine motor skills need help), and we have a TON of puzzles, lacing beads, and blocks.

I'm trying to make sure that we have what I will need or want before we move. I want it all in the same place, and then I have to decide if I want it packed with our stuff (maybe in the early shipment?) or if I want to mail it out to Daniel (hubby) before we leave so it is there when we get there. Ack! So many choices. Any ideas? I would like to do new things with her that might spark her interest. I can't sit and explain things to her really, as she doesn't comprend what I'm saying to her, but to some degree I can...and want to. We need things to DO. Things to help her catch up to her age group.

We will also have a lapse in services when we move. I don't know how long it will take to get us back in speech, OT and PT. Can you tell I'm kinda freaking?!

by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 7:51 PM
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Replies (1-3):
ajmama16
by New Member on Oct. 13, 2009 at 9:04 AM

On Cafe Mom, there is a "homeschooling special children" group that is fantastic.  Check that out.  I homeschool my little aspie (he's 9).  There's tons of material online as well.  What we do, is get stuff online, and also, buy curriculum at Lake Shore Learning.  They have an online presence as well. 

You know your daughter better than anyone.  Go with what she likes, and make it fun.  My son is SOOO much happier being home schooled that he asks for extra projects.  It's perfect for us.

Feel free to e-mail me if you want.  I don't want to overshare or innundate you with more than you wanted.

Good luck in Germany!

Cindy

Redpumkin
by Member on Oct. 13, 2009 at 8:03 PM

It can feel very overwhelming to take this on.  Try to relax and not put too much pressure on yourself or her.  I would suggest maybe playing with her a lot, at first.  Using things she likes, you can work things in at her level.  Like if she likes babies, you can eventually count babies, observe colors the babies wear, and self help this with the baby.  Something like, "look, the baby needs to blow her nose!"  And have the baby blow her nose, and add "so do I" and blow your nose, saying " wow, that feels so much better!  I can breathe better now, and so can baby!".  I bet she'll soon want to blow her nose if she doesn't already know how.  Or the baby needs to wipe her mouth, or brush her teeth (My teeth or babies teeth feel dirty and icky, we're going to brush them.  Oh, my teeth feel so good after I brush them!), or using the potty.  Stuff like that, made fun and interesting. 

The biggest thing, I think though is to really build your connection with her.  I'm not saying you aren't connected now, at all.  I don't know how much time you spend playing with her every day.  Maybe you spend all day playing with her.  But I have seen time and time again with myself and so many other families that the more connected you are, the more she will want to do what you ask of her.  She will blossom just from the connection.  Forced compliance often backfires.  I have seen it many times from others and learned also from making that mistake myself.  Oh yeah, I made that mistake more times than I care to admit.  The getting better results with honey than vinegar thing is even more true with our kids.   

For my son, I need to pay close attention to his cues.  If he is tired, overstimulated, hungry, or whatever, I need to stop, give him a break, feed him, hug him, give him a bath.  The bathtub is a great place for ABC's and counting and other stuff.  There is no rush.  I always felt like I needed to teach my son everything he was missing, somehow magically get him "caught up."  If I could do that, that I wouldn't be here on an autism list.   I have been stressing myself out for 13 years trying to that. 

I don't know if this fits into your values or parenting style.  I know my own parenting style changed a lot over the years, when trying the same thing over and over didn't work.  We recently stumbled upon a teaching technique and program that has been really wonderful.  My son has never been more compliant, happier or more ready to learn things on his own.  I wish I had found it when he was younger!

Here's a link to a video about it.  Maybe it's something that interests you, maybe not.  I just know that after 13 years of trying so many things, ABA, VB, Floortime, RDI, you name it, nothing worked as well, or gave me the tools I need to be effective like this program. 

 http://www.autismtreatmentcenter.org/media:video,20,0 

Anyway, I wish you luck!!!  What an adventure you guys are on. 

{{{{{{Hugs}}}}}}

Teresa

 

MommyJanice44
by Head Admin on Oct. 14, 2009 at 11:33 AM


Quoting Redpumkin:

It can feel very overwhelming to take this on.  Try to relax and not put too much pressure on yourself or her.  I would suggest maybe playing with her a lot, at first.  Using things she likes, you can work things in at her level.  Like if she likes babies, you can eventually count babies, observe colors the babies wear, and self help this with the baby.  Something like, "look, the baby needs to blow her nose!"  And have the baby blow her nose, and add "so do I" and blow your nose, saying " wow, that feels so much better!  I can breathe better now, and so can baby!".  I bet she'll soon want to blow her nose if she doesn't already know how.  Or the baby needs to wipe her mouth, or brush her teeth (My teeth or babies teeth feel dirty and icky, we're going to brush them.  Oh, my teeth feel so good after I brush them!), or using the potty.  Stuff like that, made fun and interesting. 

The biggest thing, I think though is to really build your connection with her.  I'm not saying you aren't connected now, at all.  I don't know how much time you spend playing with her every day.  Maybe you spend all day playing with her.  But I have seen time and time again with myself and so many other families that the more connected you are, the more she will want to do what you ask of her.  She will blossom just from the connection.  Forced compliance often backfires.  I have seen it many times from others and learned also from making that mistake myself.  Oh yeah, I made that mistake more times than I care to admit.  The getting better results with honey than vinegar thing is even more true with our kids.   

For my son, I need to pay close attention to his cues.  If he is tired, overstimulated, hungry, or whatever, I need to stop, give him a break, feed him, hug him, give him a bath.  The bathtub is a great place for ABC's and counting and other stuff.  There is no rush.  I always felt like I needed to teach my son everything he was missing, somehow magically get him "caught up."  If I could do that, that I wouldn't be here on an autism list.   I have been stressing myself out for 13 years trying to that. 

I don't know if this fits into your values or parenting style.  I know my own parenting style changed a lot over the years, when trying the same thing over and over didn't work.  We recently stumbled upon a teaching technique and program that has been really wonderful.  My son has never been more compliant, happier or more ready to learn things on his own.  I wish I had found it when he was younger!

Here's a link to a video about it.  Maybe it's something that interests you, maybe not.  I just know that after 13 years of trying so many things, ABA, VB, Floortime, RDI, you name it, nothing worked as well, or gave me the tools I need to be effective like this program. 

 http://www.autismtreatmentcenter.org/media:video,20,0 

Anyway, I wish you luck!!!  What an adventure you guys are on. 

{{{{{{Hugs}}}}}}

Teresa

 

I totally loved what you had to say .............. GOOD JOB MOMMA ..  high fiveThat video rocked , loved Raun , Love the way he feel's I too always feel we need to folllow there lead , do what they are doing , Just be happy if not pretend .......  YAHHHHHHHHHHHH LOVED IT MUST WATCH ,

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