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Panicky Moments

Posted by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 3:12 PM
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I  have an 11 year old girl with Aspergers. My son who is 17 months has a different Dad so I  know there should be little to no risk of genetic autism popping up again. Her Dad is borderline ASD himself.

Yet I  sit here worrying that since he is not talking yet he might be on the spectrum. Deep down I know he is way too affectionate to be on the spectrum but that does not stop me from worrying. I  think it is the hormones from this pregnancy getting me riled up. Fear that I  will end up with 4 special needs kids.

Most of my sons delays are gross motor mainly and easily explained by the torticullis issues. His sister was extremely verbal and by 13 months was saying sentences. They are two completely different children.

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by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 3:12 PM
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mamatware
by Bronze Member on Jan. 25, 2009 at 4:32 PM

I would suggest getting an early intervention eval done at around 18 months, they are FREE.  And that evaluation will show if their is anything to be concerned about, that needs therapy now (and if it does the therapy would be little to no cost-depends on the state), and anything that needs followed up on.

Now for my off topic response about your son with the gross motor delays-that has (or had) torticolis.  My son has cerebral palsy, mild mental retardation and autistic tendencies.  As an infant Robby had tort, then global delays emerged, so I encourage you to have him see a developmental pediatrician and an eye doc.  Because what if the tort isn't the explanation-but a clue to something bigger?  That was the case with us, the tort was a clue to the cp, and well....turned out that the cp made him more prone to get tort, but the cause of the tort was his vision-and the tort improved 50% after he got glasses, and then was totally resolved after his eye surgery.  Sometimes tort is tort, sometimes....it's more....but with other gross motor delays....I would definately have it checked into.

typres052608
by Member on Jan. 25, 2009 at 4:54 PM

I agree with the above poster get an early intervention eval done it won't hurt,

my son is 2 with asd and he is very lovable and affectionate-he loves kissing and hugging but mostly me and sometimes his teacher

nycte
by on Jan. 25, 2009 at 9:39 PM

He does have some physical therapy and speech therapy access right now so hopefully those two ladies can help us find where to go for the eval.He has had his eyes checked and they are watching his development there. Nothing major so far. Just one looked a little off to the naked eye. Dr says they are fine.

He is such a funny baby. Hubby put him in bed with us the other night after I had been at my Dads for a few days and he stood over me giving me all kinds of baby kisses and hugs. I felt so loved. My daughter was never into kissing us and only hugs the family pets. It totally amuses me when he is so affectionate. This is a whole new experience with him.

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my2boyz117
by on Jan. 26, 2009 at 8:15 AM

Hi, you mentioned they have 2 different Dad's but the Genetic part could be from you, (even if you don't have Autism) I believe....that's how it can work, so I would keep a close eye out as you know what to look for.

mamatware
by Bronze Member on Jan. 26, 2009 at 9:32 AM


Quoting my2boyz117:

Hi, you mentioned they have 2 different Dad's but the Genetic part could be from you, (even if you don't have Autism) I believe....that's how it can work, so I would keep a close eye out as you know what to look for.


She is correct-it could be X linked.  Meaning that when you make a baby, mommy gives an X chromosome, the only thing she can give-but dad can give an X or a Y.  If dad gives an X you get a girl, and he throws a Y it's a boy.  Which could be part of why autism is more prominent in boys than girls.  Because many times in girls if their is an issue with one of the X chromosomes the other one can make up for it an be dominant and the girl may never know she has an issue.  But with boys you have XY and one can't cover for the other the same way it can in girls. 

nycte
by on Jan. 26, 2009 at 11:29 AM

Yes I am aware of xlinked disorders. I  do not think this is the case with my daughter because her father is borderline aspie himself. I know that I carry some of the components but not all. Like I said I have SID and most of my father's line has SID on one side. That seems to pop up regardless of sex and has carried through the male side of the line.

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