Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Baking 101 Baking 101

* ~ Kitchen Basics ~*

Posted by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 6:35 PM
  • 28 Replies

     

     A place to put all our tips, tricks and baking secretes.  Can't wait to hear yours.  

by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 6:35 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
dntbgmeb4cofe
by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 6:35 PM

Light Versus Dark Brown Sugar

 

What is the difference between light brown and dark brown sugar? Can they be used interchangeably?  

Both types of brown sugar are a mixture of sugar and molasses, with dark brown sugar containing more molasses than light brown sugar. Light brown sugar has a delicate flavor while dark brown sugar has a stronger more intense molasses flavor. They can be used interchangeably depending on your personal preference.

dntbgmeb4cofe
by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 6:36 PM

Flour Facts

 

I have a lot of bread flour that I use in my bread machine. Can I use this flour when a recipe calls for all-purpose flour? If not, how long will bread flour last if I store it in the original bag and then inside a plastic bag?  

Bread flour is made from high-gluten hard wheat flour that gives strength and elasticity to yeast doughs. Bread flour can also be used for other yeast-raised doughs, strudel, puff pastry, popovers and pasta where strength and elasticity are desired. All-purpose flour is a blend of both high-gluten hard wheat and low-gluten soft wheat flours. It, too, can be used for yeast breads, but the loaves will not rise quite as high. All-purpose flour is ideally suited for baked goods where tenderness is desired. Unfortunately, bread flour is not suitable for making cakes, quick breads, muffins, pie crusts and pancakes. Bread flour should be stored in an airtight container in a cool dry place and has a shelf life of 10–15 months. For longer storage, freeze in an airtight container. Before using refrigerated flour in yeast doughs, warm it to room temperature so it does not slow the rising of the dough.

dntbgmeb4cofe
by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 6:38 PM

Big Batch Baked Goods

 

We enjoy homemade baked goods for breakfast, but I don’t have time to bake each morning before school. So I devote 1 day a month to making large batches of cinnamon rolls, doughnuts, cream cheese rolls and muffins. I place them in heavy-duty resealable plastic bags labeled with the date. (They freeze for about 2 months.) On busy mornings, it’s a snap to pop a few in the microwave to warm. The kids love the fresh-baked flavor. 

dntbgmeb4cofe
by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 6:39 PM

Testing Baking Powder and Soda

 

If you don't seem to have much success with making baked goods, there may be a simple answer—your baking powder and/or baking soda may not be fresh. The shelf life for these products is about 6 months, but here's how to test for freshness to be sure:

For baking powder, place 1 teaspoon baking powder in a cup and add 1/3 cup hot tap water.

For baking soda, place 1/4 teaspoon baking soda in a cup and add 2 teaspoons vinegar.

If active bubbling occurs, the products are fine to use. If not, they should be replaced. When buying a new can, check for an expiration date.

4kidz916
by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 6:59 PM

If you have a recipe that calls for buttermilk and you don't have any, you can make your own:

Add 1 T white vinegar to one cup of milk and let it stand for 5 min.  Voila--a substitute that works just as well as the real thing.

daiseymae2
by on Apr. 12, 2011 at 10:51 PM
Keep on hand a chart of measurement equivalents. It really comes in handy.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
fineyouguyswin
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 12:38 PM

Very interesting ladies

AllThatBabyJazz
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 12:45 PM

Save your butter wrappers in a baggie in the freezer. It's a fast and frugal way to grease a pan. 

goorob
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:48 PM


Quoting dntbgmeb4cofe:

Testing Baking Powder and Soda


If you don't seem to have much success with making baked goods, there may be a simple answer—your baking powder and/or baking soda may not be fresh. The shelf life for these products is about 6 months, but here's how to test for freshness to be sure:

For baking powder, place 1 teaspoon baking powder in a cup and add 1/3 cup hot tap water.

For baking soda, place 1/4 teaspoon baking soda in a cup and add 2 teaspoons vinegar.

If active bubbling occurs, the products are fine to use. If not, they should be replaced. When buying a new can, check for an expiration date.

huh, I've had mine for years...oops :)  I've never noticed a difference in my baked goods though so that's good :)

clockKelly

4kidz916
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 8:50 PM

I like this one.  Thanks for sharing.


Quoting AllThatBabyJazz:

Save your butter wrappers in a baggie in the freezer. It's a fast and frugal way to grease a pan. 


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN