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Baking 101 Baking 101

Yorkshire pudding help!

Posted by on Jan. 14, 2013 at 10:03 PM
  • 1 Replies

I'm going to try to make Yorkshire pudding for a meal idea. I have never made it before. I have a limited variety of baking dishes to choose from so I'm not sure which one to use. Could I just use a square glass casserole dish? Or does it have to be a circle? I do have a few different size springform pans, but I'm assuming that the batter or grease would be runny enough to where it would leak out.

by on Jan. 14, 2013 at 10:03 PM
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Replies (1-1):
MixedCooke
by on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:47 AM

In this recipe, they used simple cupcake/muffin pans:

A classic Yorkshire Pudding is quick, easy to make and with this, my best Yorkshire Pudding recipe, guarantees success every time. A traditional Yorkshire Pudding fresh from the oven should be well-risen, golden brown with a crisp exterior and soft middle.

Yorkshire Puddings are a classic British recipe and one of the major components of England's national dish, Roast Beef and Yorkshire Puddings, a regional dish with national (and international) appeal.

Watch My Video of How to Make Perfect Yorkshire Puddings

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: Depends on size of tin used.

Ingredients:

  • 4 large, fresh eggs, measured in a jug
  • Equal quantity of milk to eggs
  • Equal quantity of all purpose/plain flour to eggs
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tbsp lard, beef dripping or vegetable oil

Preparation:

Serves 6
  • Heat the oven to the highest temperature possible, however, do not exceed 450F/230C or the fat may burn.
  • Pour the eggs and milk into a large mixing bowl and add the pinch of salt. Whisk thoroughly with an electric hand beater or hand whisk. Leave to stand for 10 minutes.
  • Gradually sieve the same volume of flour (as the eggs) into the milk and egg mixture, again using an electric hand beater or hand-whisk to create a lump free batter resembling thick cream, if there are any lumps pass the batter through a fine sieve.
  • Leave the batter to rest in the kitchen for a minimum of 30 minutes, longer if possible - up to several hours.
  • Place a pea-sized piece of lard, dripping or ½ tsp vegetable oil into your chosen Yorkshire pudding tin, or a 4 x 2"/5cm hole tin or 12-hole muffin tin and heat in the oven until the fat is smoking. Give the batter another good whisk adding 2 tbsps of cold water and fill a third of each section of the tin with batter and return quickly to the oven.
  • Leave to cook until golden brown approx 20 minutes. Repeat the last step again until all the batter is used up.

    Serving Yorkshire Pudding
    • In Yorkshire serving the pudding is traditionally with gravy as a starter dish followed by the meat and vegetables. More often smaller puddings cooked in muffin tins are served alongside meat and vegetables.
    • Yorkshire pudding isn't reserved only for Sunday lunch. A large pudding filled with a meaty stew or chili is a dish in its own right.
    • Cold left-over Yorkshire Puddings make a lovely snack with a little jam or honey.
    • Yorkshire Puddings do not reheat well, becoming brittle and dry.
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