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Sisters I have a question

Posted by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 12:12 PM
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I was wondering is there certain decorations that we can put up on our livingroom?  And end tables, coffee table too?  Is there any certain decorations we shouldn't have in our homes?

by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 12:12 PM
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-Cassandra-
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 2:36 PM
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Scholars vary somewhat but generally they say no human representations.  Some say even pitcures of family are not to be displayed while others say as long as they are not above eye level and others say pictures of family are okay but no paintings or statuettes of humans.  Decorations that related to the beliefs and worship of non-believers is generally not okay either so no crosses or buddahs or anything like that.

Hafsa1
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 2:40 PM
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vases, decorative plates, plants, books, lamps, etc would be ok I think. We don't do photos just because it's so iffy.

Oh, I also like to paint, so we put up things I have done like signs that say Allah (swt), but no images of people, animals, etc.
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Anagalia022
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 3:14 PM



Quoting -Cassandra-:

Scholars vary somewhat but generally they say no human representations.  Some say even pitcures of family are not to be displayed while others say as long as they are not above eye level and others say pictures of family are okay but no paintings or statuettes of humans.  Decorations that related to the beliefs and worship of non-believers is generally not okay either so no crosses or buddahs or anything like that.

I have American Native Indian decorations in my home.  Do I need to take those down?  Does that mean I need to take down the photo's of my family that are not Muslim.  I have pictures of my late father on the wall.  Does that need to come down too?


MENAMAMA
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 8:51 PM
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Many scholors disagree on wall decor with Qur'anic verses and such to be used as wall decor. Shaykh Mohammed Salih Al-Munajjid was asked this same question and these is the response he gave.

Praise be to Allaah.

Hanging plaques and cloths containing aayaat of the Qur’aan in homes, schools, social clubs and places of business, involves a number of reservations and prohibitions according to Islaam, such as the following:

(1) In most cases, hanging such things on the wall is done for purposes of decoration and adornment, as the aayaat etc. are written in calligraphy and colourful brocade. This is an inappropriate use of the Qur’aan, as it was revealed to guide people and to be read regularly. The Qur’aan was not revealed to decorate walls, but to guide mankind.

(2) Some people hang up such things for “blessing” - which is a form of bid‘ah. The blessing as described in Islaam comes from reading or reciting the Qur’aan, not from hanging it up or placing it on shelves or turning it into artwork and three-dimensional images.

(3) This is contrary to the practice of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and the Rightly-Guided Khaleefahs (al-Khulafaa’ al-Raashidoon), may Allaah be pleased with them, who never did such a thing. The best way is to follow them, not to introduce bid‘ah. History tells us that in places such as Andalusia, Turkey, etc., the adornment of houses and mosques with ornate carvings of aayaat only happened at times when the Muslims were weak and humiliated.

(4) Hanging up such pictures or plaques could lead to shirk, because some people think that these things are amulets that will protect the house and its people from evil and disease. This is shirk and is haraam, because the One Who really offers protection is Allaah, may He be glorified, and one of the means of gaining His protection is sincere recitation of the Qur’an and du‘aa’s taught in the Qur’aan and Sunnah.

(5) There is the risk that the Qur’aan may be used, in such cases, as a means of promoting one’s business or increasing one’s earnings. The Qur’aan should be protected from being used for such purposes. It is well-known that the production and sale of these pictures and plaques involves a great deal of extravagance and wasting money.

(6) Many of these plaques are painted with real gold, which makes using them and hanging them up even more haraam.

(7) Many of these plaques involve a kind of carelessness, because the letters are twisted into complex designs that are of no benefit to anyone because they are barely legible. Sometimes words are fashioned into the shape of a bird or a man prostrating, and similarly forbidden pictures of animate beings.

(8) Ayaat and soorahs of the Qur’aan are exposed to misuse and abuse by this practice. For example, when moving house, they are piled up with the rest of the furniture and belongings, and other objects may be placed on top of them. This also happens when they are taken down so that the wall may be painted or cleaned.

(9) Some Muslims whose observance of Islaam is lacking put these plaques and pictures up so that they can feel that they are doing something religious, in order to reduce their feelings of guilt – in spite of the fact that this practice does not help them in any way.

All in all, we must close the doors of evil and follow the leaders of guidance of the early centuries of Islam, whose people the Prophet (peace be upon him) testified were the best of the Muslims in faith and practice. If someone were to say, “We are not going to abuse it or make it a decoration or exaggerate about it, we only want to remind people (about their religion) in our gatherings”, our response would be: if we look at real life, will we find that this is what actually happens? Do people really remember Allaah? Do they even read these aayaat when they raise their heads?

What really happens is the opposite: people go against the words hanging over their heads, they still tell lies, engage in gossip, make fun of others and do and say evil things. Even if we assume that there are some who do benefit from these plaques etc., the fact is that they are very few, and this does not change the hukm (Islamic ruling) on the matter.

The Muslims must turn to the Book of Allaah, read it and recite it, and act in accordance with it. We ask Allaah to make the Qur’aan a light of guidance for us, and a means of removing our grief and anxiety. May Allaah bless our Prophet Muhammad.




In our home we use Arabic decor. However there is nothing on our walls perse. We do have one gift on our wall. It's like a tablecloth hand woven with no words or discription of anything and it's extended longer than our table, so we hung it up. Also, we have a wall covering of the kaba'a but that is to show us the direction for the salat (prayer). Everything else is from Saudi Arabia such as 


We don't have these exact ones, but we have things similar. There are many things you can decor your home with without photos or Qur'anic/Hadiths. Also, there is an hadith from our dear beloved Prophet Mohammed(sws) saying: "The Malaaikah (angels of mercy) do not enter a house wherein there are pictures (of animate objects) (Muslim, Hadith: 5485, Darul Ma'rifah) 

Also, it is narrated that the Prophet Mohammed(sws) says: "Those who make pictures will be punished on the day of judgment. It will be said to them, "Bring to life what you have created!" (Muslim, Hadith 5501, Darul Ma'rifah)

 It is narrated on the authority of Ibn Abbaas (Radiallahu Anhu) that the Prophet Mohammed (sws) said, "Every person who creates pictures of animate objects will be in the fire of Hell. Every picture that he created will be given a life and will punish him in Jahannum. (Muslim, Hadith: 5506, Darul Ma'rifah)

 It is also narrated on the authority of Ibn Abbaas (Radiallahu Anhu) that the Prophet (sws) said, "Whoever produces a picture (of an animate object) in this world will be forced to bring it to life on the Day of Judgment but he will be unable to do so. (Muslim, Hadith: 5507, Darul Ma'rifah)

Again narrated on the authority of Ibn Mas'ood (Radiallahu Anhu) that the Prophet (sws) said, "The people who will be most severely punished on the Day of Judgment are those who make pictures. (of animate objects) (Muslim, Hadith: 5505, Darul Ma'rifah)


I understand you have things that are Native American. My mother is Cherokee, and she give us a lot of stuff and so does my friend who is not a religious muslim who is also Cherokee. Anything that would be consider an invocation or could be seen as an invocation such a dream catcher, is not anywhere inside our home. 

At first it was hard getting rid of these things, but pleasing Allaah became a priority for myself as well as our household. So, most things had to go.

May Allaah guide you into what is the right direction for you and your family insha'Allaah. Ameen!

MENAMAMA

Anagalia022
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 9:53 PM



Quoting MENAMAMA:

Many scholors disagree on wall decor with Qur'anic verses and such to be used as wall decor. Shaykh Mohammed Salih Al-Munajjid was asked this same question and these is the response he gave.

Praise be to Allaah.

Hanging plaques and cloths containing aayaat of the Qur’aan in homes, schools, social clubs and places of business, involves a number of reservations and prohibitions according to Islaam, such as the following:

(1) In most cases, hanging such things on the wall is done for purposes of decoration and adornment, as the aayaat etc. are written in calligraphy and colourful brocade. This is an inappropriate use of the Qur’aan, as it was revealed to guide people and to be read regularly. The Qur’aan was not revealed to decorate walls, but to guide mankind.

(2) Some people hang up such things for “blessing” - which is a form of bid‘ah. The blessing as described in Islaam comes from reading or reciting the Qur’aan, not from hanging it up or placing it on shelves or turning it into artwork and three-dimensional images.

(3) This is contrary to the practice of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and the Rightly-Guided Khaleefahs (al-Khulafaa’ al-Raashidoon), may Allaah be pleased with them, who never did such a thing. The best way is to follow them, not to introduce bid‘ah. History tells us that in places such as Andalusia, Turkey, etc., the adornment of houses and mosques with ornate carvings of aayaat only happened at times when the Muslims were weak and humiliated.

(4) Hanging up such pictures or plaques could lead to shirk, because some people think that these things are amulets that will protect the house and its people from evil and disease. This is shirk and is haraam, because the One Who really offers protection is Allaah, may He be glorified, and one of the means of gaining His protection is sincere recitation of the Qur’an and du‘aa’s taught in the Qur’aan and Sunnah.

(5) There is the risk that the Qur’aan may be used, in such cases, as a means of promoting one’s business or increasing one’s earnings. The Qur’aan should be protected from being used for such purposes. It is well-known that the production and sale of these pictures and plaques involves a great deal of extravagance and wasting money.

(6) Many of these plaques are painted with real gold, which makes using them and hanging them up even more haraam.

(7) Many of these plaques involve a kind of carelessness, because the letters are twisted into complex designs that are of no benefit to anyone because they are barely legible. Sometimes words are fashioned into the shape of a bird or a man prostrating, and similarly forbidden pictures of animate beings.

(8) Ayaat and soorahs of the Qur’aan are exposed to misuse and abuse by this practice. For example, when moving house, they are piled up with the rest of the furniture and belongings, and other objects may be placed on top of them. This also happens when they are taken down so that the wall may be painted or cleaned.

(9) Some Muslims whose observance of Islaam is lacking put these plaques and pictures up so that they can feel that they are doing something religious, in order to reduce their feelings of guilt – in spite of the fact that this practice does not help them in any way.

All in all, we must close the doors of evil and follow the leaders of guidance of the early centuries of Islam, whose people the Prophet (peace be upon him) testified were the best of the Muslims in faith and practice. If someone were to say, “We are not going to abuse it or make it a decoration or exaggerate about it, we only want to remind people (about their religion) in our gatherings”, our response would be: if we look at real life, will we find that this is what actually happens? Do people really remember Allaah? Do they even read these aayaat when they raise their heads?

What really happens is the opposite: people go against the words hanging over their heads, they still tell lies, engage in gossip, make fun of others and do and say evil things. Even if we assume that there are some who do benefit from these plaques etc., the fact is that they are very few, and this does not change the hukm (Islamic ruling) on the matter.

The Muslims must turn to the Book of Allaah, read it and recite it, and act in accordance with it. We ask Allaah to make the Qur’aan a light of guidance for us, and a means of removing our grief and anxiety. May Allaah bless our Prophet Muhammad.




In our home we use Arabic decor. However there is nothing on our walls perse. We do have one gift on our wall. It's like a tablecloth hand woven with no words or discription of anything and it's extended longer than our table, so we hung it up. Also, we have a wall covering of the kaba'a but that is to show us the direction for the salat (prayer). Everything else is from Saudi Arabia such as 


We don't have these exact ones, but we have things similar. There are many things you can decor your home with without photos or Qur'anic/Hadiths. Also, there is an hadith from our dear beloved Prophet Mohammed(sws) saying: "The Malaaikah (angels of mercy) do not enter a house wherein there are pictures (of animate objects) (Muslim, Hadith: 5485, Darul Ma'rifah) 

Also, it is narrated that the Prophet Mohammed(sws) says: "Those who make pictures will be punished on the day of judgment. It will be said to them, "Bring to life what you have created!" (Muslim, Hadith 5501, Darul Ma'rifah)

 It is narrated on the authority of Ibn Abbaas (Radiallahu Anhu) that the Prophet Mohammed (sws) said, "Every person who creates pictures of animate objects will be in the fire of Hell. Every picture that he created will be given a life and will punish him in Jahannum. (Muslim, Hadith: 5506, Darul Ma'rifah)

 It is also narrated on the authority of Ibn Abbaas (Radiallahu Anhu) that the Prophet (sws) said, "Whoever produces a picture (of an animate object) in this world will be forced to bring it to life on the Day of Judgment but he will be unable to do so. (Muslim, Hadith: 5507, Darul Ma'rifah)

Again narrated on the authority of Ibn Mas'ood (Radiallahu Anhu) that the Prophet (sws) said, "The people who will be most severely punished on the Day of Judgment are those who make pictures. (of animate objects) (Muslim, Hadith: 5505, Darul Ma'rifah)


I understand you have things that are Native American. My mother is Cherokee, and she give us a lot of stuff and so does my friend who is not a religious muslim who is also Cherokee. Anything that would be consider an invocation or could be seen as an invocation such a dream catcher, is not anywhere inside our home. 

At first it was hard getting rid of these things, but pleasing Allaah became a priority for myself as well as our household. So, most things had to go.

May Allaah guide you into what is the right direction for you and your family insha'Allaah. Ameen!

MENAMAMA

Sister, thank you for all the information very helpful.  I am Cherokee/Shawnee/German Jew/Irish.  You are right it is going to be hard to take down my Native American decorations.  I do have 5 dream catchers in my home.  I have so much to remove now.  I have accepted Islam.  I will go by the Islamic ways.  Islam is also a changing one's life.  I understand that now.  I don't know what I am going to do with all my Native American things I have so many Yikes!


MENAMAMA
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 10:46 PM
1 mom liked this

Nice to meet another Cherokee sister. :) Assalaamu'Alaykum. At first it was so hard, so emotional. However, i'm sure you can find something that will link you to your heritage without invocation. For us, I kept the clothes, those that are covering properly. My son kept his mocassians.Those moccassians are very warm in the winter. We are in the hills/plateau of TN. so they come in handy during the winter. I don't know about your family, but we have quilting time with my cousins during the summer. I still can't sew anything, but I do bring the materials for the quilting and we still have our tribal colors and designs. However, nothing that would be considered invocation(bidd'aah). So, you can hang quilts or something like that if your walls are bares. 

insha'Allaah, May Allaah be with you during this transistion.

feeimanAllaah.

MENAMAMA

-Cassandra-
by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 12:17 AM
1 mom liked this

Interesting, I am also part Cherokee.  It was something my native American Great grandmother hid.  So we did not have any exposure to Cherokee beliefs or have many native american things.  The only things we have are things we bought on vacations to South Dakota where it's more plains indian stuff.  I do have a few dream catchers and native items.  I didn't get rid of them but they are also not on display.  In our craft room we have theme drawers for the kids to look thouh and learn about different things so I have a native american drawer that those things are in along with books like the legend of the blue bonnet, buffalo girl, the island of the blue dolphin, remember my name, also there's a beading loom and stuff like that.  This way when they are learning about these other cultures and hisories they can see and touch items from these cultures.  It's a way to connect with our native american past too but without giving it more importance than Islam.  Maybe you could choose some of the more interesting and meaningful things (like things that were gifts or have sentimental value) and then do something similar.

Anagalia022
by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 4:40 AM



Quoting -Cassandra-:

Interesting, I am also part Cherokee.  It was something my native American Great grandmother hid.  So we did not have any exposure to Cherokee beliefs or have many native american things.  The only things we have are things we bought on vacations to South Dakota where it's more plains indian stuff.  I do have a few dream catchers and native items.  I didn't get rid of them but they are also not on display.  In our craft room we have theme drawers for the kids to look thouh and learn about different things so I have a native american drawer that those things are in along with books like the legend of the blue bonnet, buffalo girl, the island of the blue dolphin, remember my name, also there's a beading loom and stuff like that.  This way when they are learning about these other cultures and hisories they can see and touch items from these cultures.  It's a way to connect with our native american past too but without giving it more importance than Islam.  Maybe you could choose some of the more interesting and meaningful things (like things that were gifts or have sentimental value) and then do something similar.

Sister, thank you for the suggestion.  My problem is all of my American Native items are sentimental.  I have thinking where I can put them away.  My problem is I have so much.  My dream catchers are so big don't know where to put them away.  I am still thinking what to do with them.


umsarah
by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 7:18 AM
1 mom liked this
Oh, excuse, but I am curious, what are "dream-catchers"?
Quoting Anagalia022:



Quoting -Cassandra-:

Interesting, I am also part Cherokee.  It was something my native American Great grandmother hid.  So we did not have any exposure to Cherokee beliefs or have many native american things.  The only things we have are things we bought on vacations to South Dakota where it's more plains indian stuff.  I do have a few dream catchers and native items.  I didn't get rid of them but they are also not on display.  In our craft room we have theme drawers for the kids to look thouh and learn about different things so I have a native american drawer that those things are in along with books like the legend of the blue bonnet, buffalo girl, the island of the blue dolphin, remember my name, also there's a beading loom and stuff like that.  This way when they are learning about these other cultures and hisories they can see and touch items from these cultures.  It's a way to connect with our native american past too but without giving it more importance than Islam.  Maybe you could choose some of the more interesting and meaningful things (like things that were gifts or have sentimental value) and then do something similar.

Sister, thank you for the suggestion.  My problem is all of my American Native items are sentimental.  I have thinking where I can put them away.  My problem is I have so much.  My dream catchers are so big don't know where to put them away.  I am still thinking what to do with them.



Anonopotamus
by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 7:33 AM
I'm still learning about Islam but if I can say something...

I am native American. I am enrolled with and involved with my tribe as are one entire side of my family. These NA decorations, what exactly are they? I am bothered by some of this because some may not know the history and may be unintentionally committing cultural appropriation. For instance I am from the people that the concept of a dream catcher came. You would know them as Chippewa, we call ourselves Ojibway or more broadly Anishinabeg. During the PanIndian movements and new ageism these became popular and tribes and people who never used them started making them and selling them for profit. When they originated from my people they were small, maybe the size of the palm of your hand, originally hung from cradle boards of babies and later after more assimilation with Europeans lifestyle above their cribs. It bothers me too see tattoos of them, ones hanging from rear view mirrors and what not. These are in my language called "spider" or a "dream snare". They were, before other religion came, to be used to protect babies from bad dreams that would get caught in the webbing. They sometimes had particular feathers and other ceremonial objects hung from them.

So please, not only for your religion but for respect of others heritage, bee thoughtful of what you display.
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