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Speech Delays in a child with developmental delays.

Posted by on Mar. 16, 2009 at 2:44 PM
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Has anyone ever had experience with this? My son is 11, and diagnosed multiply impaired. I am not sure how far we can go with speech with him, but he does not qualify for any speech therapy outside of what he receives in school. He goes to special ed, but because he was diagnosed with the diagnosis at birth, and the issue was not caused by trauma or disease, he does not qualify for anything for speech. The main issue we are haing with him now is that he tends to bite himself when he gets frustrated due to no way of expressing what he wants or needs. I appreciate any and all input on this matter.



Theresa, mom to Zach and Kyleightoddler girlboy on a swing

by on Mar. 16, 2009 at 2:44 PM
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AngieKaye1
by Group Owner on Mar. 18, 2009 at 11:57 PM

Please give us a little more information:

Can he communicate through speech at all?

Can he say single words?

Can he pronounce some sound or all sounds?

Have you tried sign language?  (This can work to reduce frustration when he wants to ask for something and doesn't know how to verbalize). 

Have you seen improvement with his speech through the years?

Does he sit still to read books?

How does he react to music?

Let me address a little about music.  It has been proven that some children who struggle with speech can express themselves through music and song.  Speaking words and singing words use different parts of the brain.  That means, sometimes learning sounds and words through music can allow children to express themselves verbally in ways they couldn't through normal speech.  It has also been known to jumpstart speech in children.  I would suggest simple children's songs, but sung very slowly. 

Angela



TLJC68
by on Mar. 19, 2009 at 2:41 PM


Quoting AngieKaye1:

Please give us a little more information:

Can he communicate through speech at all?

Can he say single words?

Can he pronounce some sound or all sounds?

Have you tried sign language?  (This can work to reduce frustration when he wants to ask for something and doesn't know how to verbalize). 

Have you seen improvement with his speech through the years?

Does he sit still to read books?

How does he react to music?

Let me address a little about music.  It has been proven that some children who struggle with speech can express themselves through music and song.  Speaking words and singing words use different parts of the brain.  That means, sometimes learning sounds and words through music can allow children to express themselves verbally in ways they couldn't through normal speech.  It has also been known to jumpstart speech in children.  I would suggest simple children's songs, but sung very slowly. 

Angela



To answer some of your questions.....

My son is not verbal except for babbling. He has been able to say "mama, dada, and more" in the past. He has been using sign language since he was an infant. The use of sign is difficult for him as not everyone around him can use sign.  He doesn't actually read books. He is at the mentality of a 3-5 year old. He likes music really well.  The only improvement in his speech over the years has been an increase in babbling.



Theresa, mom to Zach and Kyleightoddler girlboy on a swing

jjamom
by New Member on Mar. 19, 2009 at 3:44 PM

Have they tried the use of assistive technology with him at school?  Or maybe a PECS system?  My son has Down Syndrome and is only 3 1/2 years old, but many of the people in my local Down syndrome support group have started using assistive technology with their non-verbal children.

down-syndrome-awareness-graphic.png 

AngieKaye1
by Group Owner on Mar. 23, 2009 at 1:34 PM

My first thought is to try one sound or word and repetitively use it over a week or two and see if your child starts attempting to use it.  For example, a lot of children pick "Sssss-uper" from Sammy Learns To Talk.  If you read this book to your child at least once or twice a day, and repeat this particular word throughout the day, will he pick it up?  If your child is receptive to such sounds, I would say there's a lot of hope in speech improvement.  You just need to be very diligent in choosing the sounds and words...and then sitting down with him to read, sing, or play while using that word over and over.  Speech Therapists do this, but it isn't as progressive since they only meet with a child a few times a week.  With your child, it sounds like you need daily, if not hourly reminders of the sound and words you are trying to teach him.  

If I were you, I would do an experiment for 2-3 weeks. Choose a book with a simple sound or word that repeats itself at least 7 times.  (7 is a magical number.  It usually takes someone 7 times in order to fully absorb information.)  You can choose 'Sammy Learns To Talk'...which focuses on the S sound.  However, if this is a sound he already uses.   Or, he can already say the word "Sss-uper", then you would need to choose another book. 


Angela Holzer, MA (www.speakwithmebooks.com)

foreverthankful
by on Mar. 31, 2009 at 9:42 PM

I read your post earlier today and my heart went out to you and your child.  It is so very hard sometimes....

In thinking more about your request I was wondering if you could have a meeting with the teacher, psychologist and speech therapist to discuss your concerns. If possible you may need to request a CSE review so as everyone can come together and come up with a plan of action.  Communication is a priority....without this everything else is just too difficult to do. 

Perhaps you can develop some type of book with pictures of things your child may want to do or have in the course of the day.  There can even be picturesof specific feelings (simple facial  pictures with various emotions).  He could pick out what he wants and this would hopefully be clear to everyone.  These picture books can be easily made and can be as simple or as complicated as you would like using photos or other pictures to represent specific needs. These pictures could be covered in clear contact and put on a small key chain or even in a small photo book whatever is most easy and something your child will be able to use.  You can go over the pictures together and help him articulate in whatever way he feels able. 

Adaptive communication devices are also wonderful but to my knowledge generally very expensive.  Perhaps this is something your child could be evaluated for and if needed I believe the Board os Special Ed. will supply the funds for this device.  I don't know where this will all lead you but you are your child's voice and don't worry the school staff will help or at least point you in the right direction and from there you will do what is necessary to find the answers.  Please let me know how things work out...if I could help in anyway, don't hesitate to ask. 

My prayers are with you and your child.

P. S. There is another group within Cafe mom entitled Parenting special needs kids  perhaps you can look into this group.  They seem to have a lot to offer in terms of experience and knowledge.

GOOD LUCK!!!!

TLJC68
by on Apr. 19, 2009 at 2:13 PM


Quoting foreverthankful:

I read your post earlier today and my heart went out to you and your child.  It is so very hard sometimes....

In thinking more about your request I was wondering if you could have a meeting with the teacher, psychologist and speech therapist to discuss your concerns. If possible you may need to request a CSE review so as everyone can come together and come up with a plan of action.  Communication is a priority....without this everything else is just too difficult to do. 

Perhaps you can develop some type of book with pictures of things your child may want to do or have in the course of the day.  There can even be picturesof specific feelings (simple facial  pictures with various emotions).  He could pick out what he wants and this would hopefully be clear to everyone.  These picture books can be easily made and can be as simple or as complicated as you would like using photos or other pictures to represent specific needs. These pictures could be covered in clear contact and put on a small key chain or even in a small photo book whatever is most easy and something your child will be able to use.  You can go over the pictures together and help him articulate in whatever way he feels able. 

Adaptive communication devices are also wonderful but to my knowledge generally very expensive.  Perhaps this is something your child could be evaluated for and if needed I believe the Board os Special Ed. will supply the funds for this device.  I don't know where this will all lead you but you are your child's voice and don't worry the school staff will help or at least point you in the right direction and from there you will do what is necessary to find the answers.  Please let me know how things work out...if I could help in anyway, don't hesitate to ask. 

My prayers are with you and your child.

P. S. There is another group within Cafe mom entitled Parenting special needs kids  perhaps you can look into this group.  They seem to have a lot to offer in terms of experience and knowledge.

GOOD LUCK!!!!

Thank you for your reply. I will try to keep you all posted.

 

Theresa

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