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Beginning to feel like womens health issues pushed to the back burner?

Posted by on Nov. 20, 2009 at 12:08 PM
  • 3 Replies

Anyone else feel like the testing  that we all need to prevent cancer, have been put on the back burner? This is ridiculous!

New guidelines: Pap tests should start at age 21

By Ray Hainer, Health.com
November 20, 2009 9:56 a.m. EST
Health
Earlier screening for cervical cancer may lead to unnecessary  treatments for an increasingly rare cancer.
Earlier screening for cervical cancer may lead to unnecessary treatments for an increasingly rare cancer.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends first Pap tests at 21
  • After age 21, women should have a Pap test every two years, instead of every year
  • Rates of cervical cancer have declined by 50 percent since the 1970s

(Health.com) -- Young women should have their first Pap test no sooner than age 21, regardless of when they become sexually active, say new guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Earlier screening for cervical cancer may lead to unnecessary and possibly harmful treatments for an increasingly rare cancer, according to ACOG, the leading U.S. professional organization for obstetricians and gynecologists.

After age 21, women should have a Pap test every two years, instead of every year. At age 30, if a woman has no history of cervical cancer and has had three normal Pap tests in a row, she can be screened every three years, rather than every two to three years. (Women with certain risk factors, such as those who are HIV positive or who have a suppressed immune system, may need to be screened more often.)

However, annual pelvic exams -- which are necessary for performing a Pap test -- won't necessarily be going away. ACOG says it may still be appropriate for women to visit their doctor annually for a pelvic exam, even if a Pap test isn't performed. And sexually active adolescents shouldn't wait until age 21 to see a gynecologist for the first time. (Such visits don't necessarily have to include a pelvic exam.)

The guidelines were published this week in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Read More Here



by on Nov. 20, 2009 at 12:08 PM
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Replies (1-3):
stormcris
by Christy on Nov. 20, 2009 at 12:11 PM

That is complete and utter nonsense. If I had followed this, I would be dead. I had cervical cancer twice by 21. A few other people I know had it at least once by then.

Talee
by Gold Member on Nov. 20, 2009 at 12:26 PM

 My grandma died of cervical cancer...

This is total BS...and if this is just the beginning of rationing healthcare I am very worried what will be next..

It feels like a major slap in the face to be female and living here right now...

What can we do to stop this crap????

LancesMom
by Platinum Member on Nov. 20, 2009 at 12:36 PM


Quoting Talee:

 My grandma died of cervical cancer...

This is total BS...and if this is just the beginning of rationing healthcare I am very worried what will be next..

It feels like a major slap in the face to be female and living here right now...

What can we do to stop this crap????

I am not sure how to stop this crap! But maybe if we could find out who is behind it.... IE Insurance companies, or Washington maybe. We could shed light on our concerns.   I am sick of someone else deciding what is good for my health. And what preventive Medical precedures I receive are ok or not!

 


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