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Civil Rights

Posted by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 1:31 PM
  • 16 Replies

I was listening to a story about Bayard Rustin this morning on NPR (I can't find the link, but it was fantastic!) and I was curious, so I looked him up. There really isn't a plethora of information (he is relatively unknown as far as history and civil rights) and I found it very interesting.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayard_Rustin

Bayard Rustin

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Bayard Rustin
BayardRustinAug1963-LibraryOfCongress.jpg
Bayard Rustin at news briefing on the Civil Rights March on Washington, August 27, 1963
Date of birth: March 17, 1912(1912-03-17)
Place of birth: West Chester, Pennsylvania
Date of death: August 24, 1987 (aged 75)
Movement: African-American Civil Rights Movement, Peace Movement, Gay Rights Movement
Major organizations: Fellowship of Reconciliation, Congress of Racial Equality, Southern Christian Leadership Conference
Religion: Quaker
Influences W. E. B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, A. J. Muste, A. Philip Randolph, James L. Farmer, Jr., Mahatma Gandhi
Influenced Martin Luther King, Jr.

Bayard Rustin (March 17, 1912 - August 24, 1987) was an American civil rights activist, important largely behind the scenes in the civil rights movement of the 1960s and earlier, and the main organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.[1] He counseled Martin Luther King, Jr. on the techniques of nonviolent resistance. He became an advocate on behalf of gay and lesbian causes in the latter part of his career; however, his homosexuality was the reason for attacks from many governmental as well as interest groups.

continued here

Do you think the civil rights movement is over?

Do you think that the LGBT movement is similar to the civil rights movement of the 40's and 50's?

by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 1:31 PM
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Replies (1-10):
survivorinohio
by René on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:03 PM

I do see similarities.  I would never interfere with a persons rights and that what the far right is doing in this case.  I say this from the middle not from the left ;)

               

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


aidans_mama
by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:10 PM

No, I don't think it is over.  We have come a long way though.

No, I don't think that the LGBT movement is the same.  Two different struggles.  I hate it when people compare the two. 

Joqui
by Joqui on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:12 PM

I have to agree with aidans_mama...

 

 

Mandipants
by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:25 PM


Quoting aidans_mama:

No, I don't think it is over.  We have come a long way though.

No, I don't think that the LGBT movement is the same.  Two different struggles.  I hate it when people compare the two. 

I'm not intimating it is the same. I WAS comparing. But, in my mind that in no way diminishes the importance nor the sacrifice of the Civil Rights movement.

Huge strides were made in the Civil Rights movement (legally if not always socially) and it seems that there is now a group of people who are marginalized by laws and strictures that are fighting for their inalienable rights. Similar in scope maybe if not scale?

I find the life of Bayard Rustin fascinating, he was doubly stigmatized for being a black activist and gay in the 40's and 50's. And, the fact that he espoused Ghandian principles and was influential that way speaks to his later life and influence in the gay rights community. He himself said that 'blacks were no longer the litmus paper or barometer for social change' but gays are.

Although it is not the same, do you think perhaps it is useful to use the comparison to foster discussion? Or should we just frame it as a complete separate discussion?


mamadixon
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:28 PM

same here.

Quoting Joqui:

I have to agree with aidans_mama...




Della529
by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:28 PM

I don't see it as over.

I don't see the two movements in the same light.

I saw a documentary on Bayard Rustin on PBS over the weekend.  As as aside, James Wheldon Johnson was born in my HT and A. Phillip Randolph grew up here.

1bluediamond
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:40 PM

The civil rights movement is far from over. There continues to be blatant and unexamined racism and discrimination. It is important to continue the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders and activist to inform society that the color of your skin doesn't determine who you are and doesn't dictate your worth to society.

Similarly the gay community needs to tell society that their sexual orientation doesn't dictate their worth to society.

Bayard Rustin wanted to bring awareness for those that have been severely mistreated, oppressed and viewed as second class citizens because they don't conform to society's expectations of what is normal and moral behavior, and often unrealistic expectations of what determines our self worth. Our history is filled with racism, sexism, gender and class bias and homophobia.

 

Mandipants
by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:40 PM


Quoting Della529:

I don't see it as over.

I don't see the two movements in the same light.

I saw a documentary on Bayard Rustin on PBS over the weekend.  As as aside, James Wheldon Johnson was born in my HT and A. Phillip Randolph grew up here.

Where are we fighting the Civil Rights battle nowadays?

What kind of light do you see each movement in?

I came across that documentary while I was searching him up. Haven't had a chance to watch it yet. I'm really just surprised I hadn't heard of him much before and I'm very interested. What a life.

You live in a place that is rife with this history. I live in a place where they tend to fight over whether or not to even have an MLK Holiday.

aidans_mama
by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:41 PM


Quoting Mandipants:


Quoting aidans_mama:

No, I don't think it is over.  We have come a long way though.

No, I don't think that the LGBT movement is the same.  Two different struggles.  I hate it when people compare the two. 


Quote:

I'm not intimating it is the same. I WAS comparing.

I know mama.  You know I wub you.
 

But, in my mind that in no way diminishes the importance nor the sacrifice of the Civil Rights movement.

Huge strides were made in the Civil Rights movement (legally if not always socially) and it seems that there is now a group of people who are marginalized by laws and strictures that are fighting for their inalienable rights. Similar in scope maybe if not scale?


Quote:

I find the life of Bayard Rustin fascinating, he was doubly stigmatized for being a black activist and gay in the 40's and 50's. And, the fact that he espoused Ghandian principles and was influential that way speaks to his later life and influence in the gay rights community. He himself said that 'blacks were no longer the litmus paper or barometer for social change' but gays are.


I have learned about him in college.  He is indeed fascinating.  Although it is not the same, do you think perhaps it is useful to use the comparison to foster discussion? No.  People get so caught up in whose struggle was worst, or how they are similiar or dissimiliar that they don't focus on each movements goals.  Or should we just frame it as a complete separate discussion?  Completely separate works for me.  I can see actual discussing going on if we focused on each movement individually rather than trying to link them together.



Mandipants
by on Jan. 18, 2010 at 2:50 PM


Quoting aidans_mama:


Quoting Mandipants:


Quoting aidans_mama:

No, I don't think it is over.  We have come a long way though.

No, I don't think that the LGBT movement is the same.  Two different struggles.  I hate it when people compare the two. 


Quote:

I'm not intimating it is the same. I WAS comparing.

I know mama.  You know I wub you. And I wub you :)

But, in my mind that in no way diminishes the importance nor the sacrifice of the Civil Rights movement.

Huge strides were made in the Civil Rights movement (legally if not always socially) and it seems that there is now a group of people who are marginalized by laws and strictures that are fighting for their inalienable rights. Similar in scope maybe if not scale?


Quote:

I find the life of Bayard Rustin fascinating, he was doubly stigmatized for being a black activist and gay in the 40's and 50's. And, the fact that he espoused Ghandian principles and was influential that way speaks to his later life and influence in the gay rights community. He himself said that 'blacks were no longer the litmus paper or barometer for social change' but gays are.


I have learned about him in college.  He is indeed fascinating.  I'm stilll a little floored that I don't remember learning about him in college. Although it is not the same, do you think perhaps it is useful to use the comparison to foster discussion? No.  People get so caught up in whose struggle was worst that's a good point and one that I was trying to qualify. You CAN'T compare struggle. One persons pain is another persons glory (just look at that idiot Limbaugh), or how they are similiar or dissimiliar that they don't focus on each movements goals Another good point, but it begs the question--do you think the goals of each movement are similar?Or should we just frame it as a complete separate discussion?  Completely separate works for me.  I can see actual discussing going on if we focused on each movement individually rather than trying to link them together. Okay, then consider my OP a jumping off point. Why do you think that Rustin has largely been ignored by history? I mean the man seems like a true hero.


 



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