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Frustrated Man Bulldozes home ahead of foreclosure

Posted by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 7:20 PM
  • 6 Replies
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 7:20 PM
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tericared
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 7:27 PM

 I saw this on the news...Well at least he took out his anger on his home instead of flying a plane into a building...

othermom
by Bronze Member on Feb. 20, 2010 at 7:59 PM

Thankfully he only took out his home instead of doing something even crazy.

katy_kay
by on Feb. 21, 2010 at 9:37 AM

 I heard in another piece that he mentioned having a business he was considering also bulldozing to the ground. 

rotPferd
by Silver Member on Feb. 21, 2010 at 9:46 AM

I'm not getting any sound. Why did he do it? To me that's just stupid. He is still going to have to pay the mortgage on a pile of rubble since he admittedly destroyed it and insurance won't cover it, or will they? I can understand being frustrated but he didn't do anyone any favors. 

"Oh come on! Am I talking to myself here? I say they're vegetarian. You say GRR. I say can we talk about this? You say GRR. I don't call that communication." GRRR! "See, that's your answer to everything." --- Sid

LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Feb. 21, 2010 at 10:49 AM


Quoting rotPferd:

I'm not getting any sound. Why did he do it? To me that's just stupid. He is still going to have to pay the mortgage on a pile of rubble since he admittedly destroyed it and insurance won't cover it, or will they? I can understand being frustrated but he didn't do anyone any favors. 

I agree.  Add to it he probably just earned himself some serious jail time.  This was the opposite of "peaceful protest".

katy_kay
by on Feb. 21, 2010 at 10:57 AM

Here's the story:

MOSCOW, Ohio -- Like many people, Terry Hoskins has had troubles with his bank. But his solution to foreclosure might be unique.

Hoskins said he's been in a struggle with RiverHills Bank over his Clermont County home for nearly a decade, a struggle that was coming to an end as the bank began foreclosure proceedings on his $350,000 home.

"When I see I owe $160,000 on a home valued at $350,000, and someone decides they want to take it – no, I wasn't going to stand for that, so I took it down," Hoskins said.

View Slideshow

Hoskins said the Internal Revenue Service placed liens on his carpet store and commercial property on state Route 125 after his brother, a one-time business partner, sued him.

The bank claimed his home as collateral, Hoskins said, and went after both his residential and commercial properties.

 "The average homeowner that can't afford an attorney or can fight as long as we have, they don't stand a chance," he said.

 Hoskins said he'd gotten a $170,000 offer from someone to pay off the house, but the bank refused, saying they could get more from selling it in foreclosure.

 Hoskins told News 5's Courtis Fuller that he issued the bank an ultimatum.

 "I'll tear it down before I let you take it," Hoskins told them.

 And that's exactly what Hoskins did.

 Man Says Actions Intended To Send Message To Banks

 The Moscow man used a bulldozer two weeks ago to level the home he'd built, and the sprawling country home is now rubble, buried under a coating of snow.

 "As far as what the bank is going to get, I plan on giving them back what was on this hill exactly (as) it was," Hoskins said. "I brought it out of the ground and I plan on putting it back in the ground."

 Hoskins' business in Amelia is scheduled to go up for auction on March 2, and he told Fuller he's considering leveling that building, too.

 RiverHills Bank declined to comment on the situation, but Hoskins said his actions were intended to send a message.

 "Well, to probably make banks think twice before they try to take someone's home, and if they are going to take it wrongly, the end result will be them tearing their house down like I did mine," Hoskins said.

 Man Has No Regrets Over Bulldozing House

 Hoskins said he's heard from people all over the country since his story first aired Thursday, and he said most have been supportive.

 He said he sought legal counsel before tearing down his home and understands the possible consequences, but he has never doubted his decision once he made it.

 "When I knew I was going to lose it, I decided to take it down," Hoskins said.

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