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James O'Keefe, Accomplices Plead Guilty In Landrieu Break-In, Get Probation, Community Service, Light Fines

Posted by on May. 26, 2010 at 1:36 PM
  • 28 Replies


James O'Keefe, Accomplices Plead Guilty In Landrieu Break-In, Get Probation, Community Service, Light Fines


James Okeefe Sentenced

NEW ORLEANS — Four conservative activists accused of trying to tamper with the phones in Sen. Mary Landrieu's office pleaded guilty Wednesday to misdemeanor charges of entering federal property under false pretenses.

James O'Keefe, 25, famous for wearing a pimp costume in a video that embarrassed the ACORN, was sentenced to three years probation, 100 hours of community service and a $1,500 fine.

The FBI has said O'Keefe used his cell phone to try to capture video of two others who posed as telephone repairmen and asked to see the phones at Landrieu's office. The fourth allegedly waited outside in a car with a listening device.

O'Keefe has said the group was trying to investigate complaints that constituents calling Landrieu's office couldn't get through to criticize the Democrat's support of a health care reform bill.

Magistrate Daniel Knowles III sentenced the three other suspects to two years probation, 75 hours of community service and $1,500 fines.

O'Keefe, Stan Dai, Joseph Basel and Robert Flanagan were arrested Jan. 25 on felony charges, but federal prosecutors later reduced the charges.

Protesters marched in front of Landrieu's office in Baton Rouge last December to criticize her support for Senate health care legislation and complain they couldn't get through on her office phones. Landrieu said at the time that her office was receiving a high volume of calls and apologized.

After sentencing Wednesday, O'Keefe and the others were taken to a probation office for processing. O'Keefe said he might release a statement later in the day.

 BabyFruit Ticker

by on May. 26, 2010 at 1:36 PM
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Replies (1-10):
norwegianwood
by Platinum Member on May. 26, 2010 at 1:38 PM

 "break in???" PULEEZE. They WALKED IN to the office DURING business hours. That's not a 'break in'....hyperbolic media strikes again.

P

SxyMartini
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:05 PM

Euh they were pretending to be repairing the phone lines dressed in outfits....

When someone comes to your door pretending to be police/ repair man etc...and you let them in is it a break in??????????

LauraKW
by "Dude!" on May. 26, 2010 at 2:27 PM


Quoting norwegianwood:

 "break in???" PULEEZE. They WALKED IN to the office DURING business hours. That's not a 'break in'....hyperbolic media strikes again.

P

They were attempting to unlawfully enter a federal office under false pretenses - what charges would you suggest?


SxyMartini
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:28 PM

It doesn't matter! They are guilty!!! 

Lock the faux news heroes up!

norwegianwood
by Platinum Member on May. 26, 2010 at 2:30 PM

 Uh..no. Breaking in is a specific and it doesn't include walking in during business hours. LOL

P

Quoting SxyMartini:

Euh they were pretending to be repairing the phone lines dressed in outfits....

When someone comes to your door pretending to be police/ repair man etc...and you let them in is it a break in??????????

 

SxyMartini
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:31 PM

Burglary (also called breaking and entering[1] and sometimes housebreaking)[2] is a crime, the essence of which is entry into a building for the purposes of committing an offence. Usually that offence will be theft, but most jurisdictions specify others which fall within the ambit of burglary. To commit a burglary is to burgle(in British English) or burglarize (in American English).[3]

norwegianwood
by Platinum Member on May. 26, 2010 at 2:33 PM

 OKeefe and another were in the senator's OFFICE..they weren't attempting anything...and, the others were trying to get to the phone line centers...it's not breaking in.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/break-in

They were trying to get the consent, perhaps fraudulently, but nonetheless, they did not use force to break the locks down or enter without permission. They were trying to obtain the permission...so, again, break in?

P

Quoting LauraKW:

 

Quoting norwegianwood:

 "break in???" PULEEZE. They WALKED IN to the office DURING business hours. That's not a 'break in'....hyperbolic media strikes again.

P

They were attempting to unlawfully enter a federal office under false pretenses - what charges would you suggest?

 

 

SxyMartini
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:34 PM

 Guilty Plea From James O’Keefe

May 26, 2010 - 2:00 PM | by: Eric Shawn

The conservative activist filmmaker stood in federal court in New Orleans and pled guilty to a misdemeanor charge of entering federal property under false pretenses. The 25 year old who made national headlines with his ACORN undercover video expose, was sentenced to serve 3 years probation, 100 hours of community service, and pay a $1,500 fine.

The case came after he was arrested at the New Orleans offices of Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu. O'Keefe, along with three co-defendants, said their goal was to show that the Senator's office phones were working, claiming there were complaints that people could not get through to register their opinions about the then pending Obama administration health care plan.

Two of the suspects were dressed as telephone repairmen, while O'Keefe taped them handling the phones in the reception area. In court, it was revealed that they also had a hidden camera in a construction helmet, and asked for the telephone junction box.

Prosecutors at first charged O'Keefe and the others with entering the offices "for the purpose of committing a felony," and that they tried to "manipulate" and "maliciously interfere" with the phone system.  But in court, U.S. Attorney Jordan Ginsburg said that prosecutors "did not uncover evidence they attempted to commit a felony."

When the story broke, some media reports claimed O'Keefe and the others were attempting to "wiretap" the Senator's phones, but the defense always denied that. In a Fox News interview, O'Keefe branded the media wiretapping reports as "outrageous. .all we were there to do was ask questions, make statements and film their reactions. A politician or a representative is probably not willing to be honest about wrong doing with a self identified journalist.  So what I do is I go undercover. I  propose scenarios in order to get people to be honest with me, to  have a frank discussion, nothing more than that. That's what I do in all my videos, it's what I did in the ACORN video. I  make statements, I ask questions, and film reactions, that's it."

In court, O'Keefe said that he took full responsibility for the operation, and admitted that he "never considered the security concerns of a federal building." He also said he did not "intend to misrepresent myself to any law enforcement officials."

Federal Magistrate Daniel Knowles II told the defendants that they could be a "tremendous asset to our society," but that he and the others had to learn that they had gone too far.

At one point Knowles asked co-defendant Robert Flanagan, "How could you have done something so stupid?"  Flanagan replied: "Poor judgment, sir."

U.S. District Judge Stanwood Duval, in papers filed with a motion, expressed concern about the implications on the security of federal buildings, calling what O'Keefe and the others did,"extremely serious," nothing that the "deception" they used was "unconscionable."

Having gone through the legal process, O’Keefe says he has a new video project in the works that he told Fox News he is releasing Thursday morning.

SxyMartini
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:36 PM

Why plea guilty then?

Quoting norwegianwood:

 OKeefe and another were in the senator's OFFICE..they weren't attempting anything...and, the others were trying to get to the phone line centers...it's not breaking in.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/break-in

They were trying to get the consent, perhaps fraudulently, but nonetheless, they did not use force to break the locks down or enter without permission. They were trying to obtain the permission...so, again, break in?

P

Quoting LauraKW:


Quoting norwegianwood:

 "break in???" PULEEZE. They WALKED IN to the office DURING business hours. That's not a 'break in'....hyperbolic media strikes again.

P

They were attempting to unlawfully enter a federal office under false pretenses - what charges would you suggest?


 


norwegianwood
by Platinum Member on May. 26, 2010 at 2:36 PM

 UH..that's burglary...that's not 'breaking in'  ...

P

Quoting SxyMartini:

Burglary (also called breaking and entering[1] and sometimes housebreaking)[2] is a crime, the essence of which is entry into a building for the purposes of committing an offence. Usually that offence will be theft, but most jurisdictions specify others which fall within the ambit of burglary. To commit a burglary is to burgle(in British English) or burglarize (in American English).[3]

 

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