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Saudi Arabia's betrayal to Islamic world

Posted by on Jul. 12, 2010 at 7:46 PM
  • 5 Replies

 

"Even less is known about the state religion, which is not an everyday version of Sunni or Shia Islam, but a peculiarly virulent, ultra-puritanical strain known as Wahhabism. This is the religion of the Saudi royals, the state bureaucracy, the army and air-force and, of course, Osama Bin Laden, the best-known Saudi citizen in the world, currently resident in Afghanistan" he adds.
 
Tariq Ali accurately pinpointed the root of Saudi extremism: Wahhabism, an artificially manufactured denomination of Islam which authorizes the killing of Shiite Muslims as a means of entering the heaven. The very fact that Shiite Muslims are subject to the most vicious and cruel mistreatments of fanatic Wahabis in Saudi Arabia is almost known to everyone.
 
Although the Shiites constitute a 15% minority of the Saudi Arabia's 20-million population, they're simply deprived of the most basic rudiments of a normal life and an equal right to practice their particular rites and rituals. The social situation is also the same for Shiite Saudis. According to Amir Taheri's National Review article, of the top 400 government officials in Saudi Arabia, only 1 person is Shiite. More regrettably, of the 120 members of the all-appointed Saudi parliament only two are Shiites.
 
While the international human rights organizations are accustomed to turning a blind eye to the inhuman discriminations imposed on the Saudi Shiites by the radical Wahabis, the pains and grieves of this subjugated minority are building up progressively.
 
In March 2009, a group of Shiite leaders threatened the Saudi government that they might pull out of the kingdom should the discriminatory measures against the Shiite minority remain in effect. Sheikh Nimr Baqer Al-Nimr had lashed out at the Saudi regime, calling on Shiites to "be ready to defend themselves" and brandishing the threat of secession from the oil-rich province of Qatif. The Saudi Interior Minister denied the Shiite leaders' statements while he was in New York.
 
Of the sporadic protests to the unjustifiable mistreatment of Shiites in Saudi Arabia, the most prominent one was the Human Rights Watch's warning to the Riyadh government to refrain from the further suppression of Shiites. In September 2009, the Human Rights Watch released a 32-page report in which the Saudi government was accused of "systemic state discrimination" against the Shiites in the areas of religion, education, justice and employment.
 
According to the report, "the Saudi government has long regarded its Shiite citizens through the prism of Wahhabi dogma or state stability, and brands them as unbelievers or suspects even their national loyalties"
 
"In employment, there are no Shi'a government ministers, senior diplomats or high-ranking military officers. And Shi'a students generally can't even get admission to military academies," the report says.
 
The corruption of Saudi government, however, is not limited to the extrajudicial and atrocious suppression of its Shiite citizens.
 
by on Jul. 12, 2010 at 7:46 PM
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muslimah
by on Jul. 12, 2010 at 9:19 PM

QUOTE: Although the Shiites constitute a 15% minority of the Saudi Arabia's 20-million population, they're simply deprived of the most basic rudiments of a normal life and an equal right to practice their particular rites and rituals.

Kaelansmom
by on Jul. 12, 2010 at 9:21 PM

 So... Saudi screws Muslims who do not worship as the Royals dictate??? Wow... I have no words.. it is weird.. that a group can persecute their own ....

muslimah
by on Jul. 12, 2010 at 9:27 PM


Quoting Kaelansmom:

 So... Saudi screws Muslims who do not worship as the Royals dictate??? Wow... I have no words.. it is weird.. that a group can persecute their own ....


Shiah are not considered to be real Muslims by many of the majority original mainstream Sunni. I am Sunni but I don't think like that about them. I have prayed with them, gone to their mosque, dated one recently, worked with them and some of them are like family to me but there is allot of political strife that goes back almost 1500 years as if it was just yesterday.

You also have to consider the branch of Sunni Islam in Saudi called wahhabism or Salafi is very extreme.

Kaelansmom
by on Jul. 12, 2010 at 9:42 PM

 Ok... thank you for explaining that...

tericared
by on Jul. 12, 2010 at 10:36 PM

 Thank You for posting this...I had no idea...

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