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Christopher Hitchens~

Posted by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:19 PM
  • 72 Replies

God loves you and He believes in you Mr. Hitchens smile mini

 


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by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:19 PM
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2hotTaco
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:28 PM

I understand that some think they can be saved by embracing god the last minute. Don't you think god knows our intentions? Just seems a bit insincere IMO.

butlerro1013
by Bronze Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:33 PM

That was a really great interview.  I admire him a lot, that even in the face of death he still sticks by his principles and beliefs.

I like the last question too, where he says after his death if stories circulating about how he became a believer at the end not to listen to them...

SlightlyPerfect
by Babushka Blockparty on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:33 PM

Wow.

Takes all kinds (on CafeMom), I guess...

blondekosmic15
by Ruby Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:33 PM

 

Quoting 2hotTaco:

I understand that some think they can be saved by embracing god the last minute. Don't you think god knows our intentions? Just seems a bit insincere IMO.

God discerns the heart completely. Can't hide anything from Him. He reads the mind 24/7~


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2hotTaco
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:41 PM

So if it's Armageddon and I am about to die. If I pray and embrace god wholeheartedly at that moment I will be saved? 


SlightlyPerfect
by Babushka Blockparty on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:42 PM

I can only talk about my personal experience, not Hitchens', but I will add that it's not necessarily about sticking with principles as much as it is navigating through the existential anxiety upon recognizing our own mortality and coming out on the other end.

Those who deny death even happens (e.g., people who think there is an afterlife) can change their "principles" since they don't really have any stable or constant ones (they're totally fluid since they're faith-based). People with empiricism-based "principles," like Hitchens, accept facts. Death isn't about beliefs or principles--It's about accepting facts. 

I wish I had a better term for "principles."

Quoting butlerro1013:

That was a really great interview.  I admire him a lot, that even in the face of death he still sticks by his principles and beliefs.

I like the last question too, where he says after his death if stories circulating about how he became a believer at the end not to listen to them...


butlerro1013
by Bronze Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:57 PM


Quoting SlightlyPerfect:

I can only talk about my personal experience, not Hitchens', but I will add that it's not necessarily about sticking with principles as much as it is navigating through the existential anxiety upon recognizing our own mortality and coming out on the other end.

Those who deny death even happens (e.g., people who think there is an afterlife) can change their "principles" since they don't really have any stable or constant ones (they're totally fluid since they're faith-based). People with empiricism-based "principles," like Hitchens, accept facts. Death isn't about beliefs or principles--It's about accepting facts. 

I wish I had a better term for "principles."

Quoting butlerro1013:

That was a really great interview.  I admire him a lot, that even in the face of death he still sticks by his principles and beliefs.

I like the last question too, where he says after his death if stories circulating about how he became a believer at the end not to listen to them...


Great point.  But in my eyes, his principles are logic and reason.  And when presented with death some people may waiver and try to accept something like a supernatural deity or a supernatural purpose in order to make sense of what is happening to them.  He's refusing to do that.  He's sticking to his guns I guess would be a better way to say what I mean, and I do admire that.

imamomzilla
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 3:37 PM

BUMP!

tericared
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 3:39 PM


Quoting 2hotTaco:

So if it's Armageddon and I am about to die. If I pray and embrace god wholeheartedly at that moment I will be saved? 


yep



PurdueMom
by Sherri on Mar. 28, 2011 at 3:40 PM


Spare Christopher Hitchens from prayers

The cancer-stricken author shows a grace those who insist on 'troubling deaf heaven' on his behalf can't muster

Christopher Hitchens
Christopher Hitchens. Photograph: theatlantic.com

So Christopher Hitchens isn't turning up for "Everybody pray for Christopher Hitchens Day". Ever since he announced in June that he was suffering from oesophogeal cancer, the writer has been inundated with offers of prayers for his health and salvation, offers which he has rejected with good-natured pleas for believers "not to trouble deaf heaven with your bootless cries".

Speaking to the Associated Press, he confirmed today that he would "not be participating", before making a division of the faithful who will into those who are gleeful at his predicament, those who hope for a convert and those who are asking their god to heal him. He dismisses the first two camps with the kind of vigour those familiar with his reputation might expect: "To hell with you," is his response to the first, "Thanks but no thanks" to the second. But it's his thoughtful reaction to the third which sets me thinking. Hitchens says that, if they want to pray for him, it's fine by him. "I think of it as a nice gesture," he said. "And it may well make them feel better, which is a good thing in itself."

But is it really a "nice gesture" at all? There's clearly something suspect about the motivations of those in Hitchens's first two squadrons, but the blunt disregard for the wishes of the person at the heart of this human tragedy leaves a bitter taste in the mouth, all too familiar from the pope's demands that Christianity must maintain a central place in modern life.

When asked about his health, Hitchens replied with a grace and humour which seems to evade his unwanted supporters: "Well, I'm dying, since you asked, but so are you," he said. "I'm only doing it more rapidly." Sometimes it's all too easy to forget that the man on the other side of the debating table is made from flesh and blood, rather than straw.

Sherri

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